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Full text of "History of Montgomery county, Indiana; with personal sketches of representative citizens .."

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3 1833 00094 6860 

Gc 977.201 M76H1 v. 



History of Montgomery 
COUNTY, Indiana 



HISTORY OF 



Montgomery County 



INDIANA 



WITH PERSONAL SKETCHES OF 
REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



VOLUME 1 1 



ILLUSTRATED 

^ yf^. W. BOWEN & COMPANY 
'^' INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



DEDICATION. 



This work is respectfully dedicated to 



THE PIONEERS 



long departed. May the memory of those who laid down their burdens by 

the wayside ever be fragrant as the breath of summer flowers, for 

their toils and sacrifices have made Montgomery county 

a garden of sunshine and delights. 



PREFACE ^"^""^ 



All life and achievement is evolution; present wisdom comes from past 
experience, and present commercial prosperity has come only from past exer- 
tion and suffering. The deeds and motives of the men that have gone before 
have been mstruniental in shaping the destines of later communities and 
states. The development of a new country was at once a task and a privi- 
lege. It required great courage, sacrifice and privation. Compare the pres- 
ent conditions of the people of Montgomery county, Indiana, with what they 
were one hundred years ago. From a trackless wilderness and virgin prairie, 
it has come to be a center of prosperity and civilization, with millions of 
wealth, systems of railways, grand educational institutions, splendid indus- 
tries and immense agricultural productions. Can any thinking person be 
insensible to the fascination of the study which discloses the incentives, hopes, 
aspirations and eft'orts of the early pioneers who so strongly laid the founda- 
tion upon which has been reared the magnificent prosperity of later days? 
To perpetuate the story of these people and to trace and record the social, 
political and industrial progress of the community from its first inception 
is the function of the local historian. A sincere purpose to preserve facts 
and personal memoirs that are deser\'ing of perpetuation, and which unite 
the present to the past, is the motive for the present publication. The work 
has been in the hands of able writers, who have, after much patient study 
and research, produced here the most complete biographical memoirs of 
Montgomery county, Indiana, ever offered to the public. A specially valuable 
and interesting departinent is that one devoted to the sketches of representa- 
tive citizens of this county whose records deserve preservation because of 
their worth, effort and accomplishment. The publishers desire to extend 
their thanks to the gentlemen who have so faithfully labored to this end. 
Thanks are also due to the citizens of Montgomery county for the uniform 
kindness with which they have regarded this undertaking and for their many 
services rendered in the gaining of necessary information. 

In placing the "History of Montgomery County" before the citizens, the 
publishers can conscientiously claim that they have carried out the plan as 
outlined in the prospectus. Every biographical sketch in the work has been 
submitted to the party interested, for correction, and therefore any error of 
fact, if there be any, is solely due to the person for whom the sketch was pre- 
pared. Confident that our efforts to please will fully meet the approbation 
of the public, we are. Respectfully, 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



CONTENTS 



CHAPTER I— DISCOVERY BY WHITE MEN 25 

National Policies— Colonel George Rogers Clark's Expedition — Government 
of the Northwest — The St. Clair and Wayne ExiJeditions — Organization of 
Indiana Territory— Organization as a State — "The Last of the Red Race" — 
State Internal Improvements- The Definition of Indiana — Pre-hist6ric Race. 

CHAPTER II— GEOLOGY AND TOPOGRAPHY 40 

Altitudes Above Sea-level — An Ancient Lake and Boulders — Xatur.il Scenery 
— Sugar Creek and Its Treasures. 

CHAPTER III— ORGANIZATION AND COUNTY GOVERNMENT 49 

Boundaries — The First Court House — The Second Court House — County Jail 
History — Poor Farm and County Asylum— County Oi-phan's Home — Past and 
Present Financial Affairs — Cost of Running the County in 1831 — Finances of 
1912— Valuation by Townships, in 1912— County Officers in 1913— The Wagon- 
Roads of the County— Township Officers for 1913. 

CHAPTER IV— EARLY SETTLEMENT OF THE COUNTY 63 

Settlers in 1825 — Fish and Game — Liquor Drinking — First Settlement as Seen 
By a Pioneer — The Scenes of Long Ago — As Viewed By a Youthful Immigrant 
— Hospitality Unexcelled. 

CHAPTER v.— COUNTY OFFICERS AND POLITICAL MATTERS 81 

List of Officials — Early Campaigns — Presidential Vote of the County. 

CHAPTER VI— THE MILITARY HISTORY OF THE COUNTY 87 

The Black Hawk War — War With Mexico — Only Survivor of the Mexican 
War — The Civil War — Opening Scenes of the Rebellion— List of Montgomery 
County Soldiers — Roll of Officers — Roster of Men — Died in Prison — Anderson- 
vllle— Great Battles of That War— The Spirit of the Time.s— The Famous 
Walhice Hand-bill — Resisting the Draft in Ripley Township — Crawfordsville 
Soldier's Monument — Indiana's Andersonville Monument — Grand Army Post 
at Crawfordsville — Spanish-American War — Roster. 

CHAPTER VII— EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE COUNTY _" ISO 

The Different Systems of Schools — Recapitulation — Numerous Duties of the 
County Superintendent — "Father" of the State School Fund — Disijlay of United 
States Flags— Pioneer Educational Institutions — In Walnut Township — Coal 
Creek Township — Franklin Township — Sugar Creek Township — Madison Town- 
ship — Brown Township — Clark Township — Haw Creek Academy — The Old Sem- 
inary and Academy — Waveland Collegiate Institute — Pre.sent Condition of 
Schools— List of Schools in 1910— Crawfordsville City Schools— Central High 



School Building— The Lincoln Building— The Mills Buildiug- The Willson 
Bnildiug— The Tuttle Building— Highland Building— Fiskville Building— The 
High School — Past Superintendents— Past Principals of the High School— City 
Schools of 1913— Members of the Board to Date — "Riley Day" — Wabash Col- 
lege — Its History from Founding to Today. 

CHAPTER Yin- CHURCH DENOMIXAL HISTORY 251 

Presbyterian — Baptist — Methodist — Christian and "New Light" — Society of 
Friends — Roman Catholics — United Brethren — Lutheran — Episcopal — Miscel- 
laneous Churches — County Sunday School Statistics. 

CHAPTER IX— SECRET XS.ND BENEYOLENT SOCIETIES 27S 

Masonry— Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias— Ti-ibe of Ben-Hur. 

CHAPTER X— AGRICULTURE AND COUNTY FAIRS— (By Charles E. Butler) __ 293 

CHAPTER XI— TRANSPORTATION, FREIGHTING AND RAILROAD BUILD- 
ING — (By Will L. Clark) 297 

Navigation of Sugar Creek— Outlet to the Sea— The First Railroads— Later 
Railroads — Present Railroads of Jlontgomery County — Interurban Lines — 
Introduction of Automobiles. 

CHAPTER XII— THE BENCH AND BAR OF THE COUNTY— iWith Suggestions 

by Hon. M. D. White) 307 

Early Courts — The Judges for the County^Common Pleas and Circuit Courts 
An Honored List of Attorneys — Present Montgomery County Bar — Court 
Officers. 

CHAPTER XIII— MEDICAL PROFESSION AND SOCIETY— (By Dr. Thomas J. 

Griffith) 312 

List of Most of the Physicians Who Have Practiced in the County, Including 
Those of Today — Short Personal Sketches of Physicians — The County Medical 
Society. 

CHAPTER XIY— NEWSPAPERS IN MONTGOMERY COUNTY 355 

Power of the Press — Character of Early Publications — I. F. Wade's Recol- 
lections of Newspapers— History of Crawfordsville Journal and Review— His- 
tory of All Pulilii-atious in Crawfordsville — History of All Local Newspapers 
in the Country Towns of the County. 

CHAPTER XY— BANKS AND BANKING OF THE COUNTY 354 

The Use and Demand for Banks — The First Banking House — The Elston 
Bank- — Banks of Crawfordsville — Banks Throughout the Coimty — Building and 
Loan and Trust Companies. 

CHAPTER XYI— CI^4RK TOWNSHIP 374 

Early Settlers— Early-Day Incidents and Stories— A Great Squirrel Hunt- 
Town of Ladoga — (By Hon. W. L. Anderson) — The Business Interests of 
1913— Fighting Whisky in Ladoga. 

CHAPTER XVII— MADISON TOWNSHIP 398 

Description — Topography — Wild Animals — The Early Swamps — Towns and 
\'illages. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTEK XVIII — SIGAIt CKEKK TOWNSHIP 402 

Location — Uenenil Feiitures — ludiaus iu the TownsUip — Eiu-l.v .Settlement — 
Markets — First and Otlier Events. 

CH.\I'TEK XIX— KIPI.EY TOWNSHIP 40T 

Extent of Territory — Enrly Timber Lands — Early Settlement — It's Towns and 
Hamlets. 

CHAPTER XX— BKOWN TOWNSHIP 410 

Location — Description — Population 15)10 — Soils, Streams and Topography — Lalve 
Harney — Early Industries — Settlement — First Events — Township Organiza- 
tion — Natural Summer Resorts — A True .Snake Story — Towns and Villages — 
First Happenings — Great Conflagrations — Municipal History — Present Busi- 
ness Interests — Brown's Valley — New Market. 

CHAPTER XXI— SCOTT TOWNSHIP 420 

Boundaries. Description— Settlement — First Events— The Terrible Tornado of 
1S60— Singular Indian Burials— New Market. 

CHAPTER XXII— FR.VXKLIN TOWNSHIP 427 

Topography — Boundaries — Forest Lands — Township Organization — First to 
Enter Lands — First Improvements — Darlington— Business Interests of 1013 
Village of Shannondale — Home of the Late Governor Mount. 

CHAPTER XXIII— WAYNE TOWNSHIP 434 

Extent of Territory — First to Settle — The True Pioneer — Early Reminiscences- 
Towns and Tillages — Waynetown — Wesley. 

CHAPTER XXIV— WALNUT TOWNSHIP 439 

Organization — Condition Ninety-three Years Ago — First Settlement — Towns 
of Walnut Towushiii — New Ross — Origin of the Name "New Ross"— Village 
of Mace. 

CHAPTER XXV— COAL CREEK TOWNSHIP 447 

Boundaries — Natural Features — First Settlers — Meharry's Grove— Corn Shuck- 
ing Bees — Towns and Villages — Wingate — It's Present Business Standing — 
General Village History (From "The Prize Village History of John Blacker.") 

CH-\PTER XXVI— THE CITY OF CRAWFORDSVILLE AND UNION TOWNSHIP. 456 

Extent and Size of Union Township— Population in 1910 — Removal of Land 
Office From Terre Haute to Crawfordsville — Original Town Platting — Founder 
of Crawfordsville. Major Ambrose Whitlock — The Beginnings — Early History 
of City — Interesting Paragraphs — Early-Day Beef and Pork Packing — Great 
Brick Works — The City in 1907— Industiies of the City One Decade Ago — 
Octogenarians of Crawfordsville — Population by becades — Other Items — Post- 
office Histor.v— Municipal History — Mayors of the City — City Officials of To- 
day—City Hall— Fire Department — Watei and Light Company — City Parks — 
Finances— Crawfordsville Gas Light Company — Heating Company — Union 
Hospital— The Humane Society— Cemeteries of the City — General Lew Wal- 
lace's Statue — Public Library — Patriotic Order Sons of America — Various 
Lodges of the City— Young Men's Chri-stian Association— The Ouiatenon Club — 
Montgomery County Historical Society. 



CHAPTER XXVII— MISCELLANEOUS EVENTS OF INTEREST 484 

The County's Population — The Census of 1910— People Over Eighty Tears of 
Agc^Re-Union of Old Men— First Iron Bridge in County— Digging "Sang"— 
Old Settlers' Reunion — Market Quotations — A Skunk Farm— An Old-Time 
Arithmetic— "Brown's Dusf— Nebraska Sufferers— A General Washington 
Autograph— Early Hot-Water Cure — Wealthy Persons of Montgomery County 
—Taking Down the "Stars and Stripes"— Papoose Buried in Tree-top— Tem- 
perance Waves— Days of Sorrow in This Copnty — Death of Lincoln, of Gar- 
field, of McKinley, of Grant — Prohibition Vote by Townships in 1909 — Men 
and Women of Mark— Village Plats— The Famous Old Sperry Bridge— The 
"Ferris Wheel" — "Underground Railroad" at Crawfordsville— Horse Thief's 
Detective Societies — Interesting Incidents Concerning Horse Stealing. 

CHAPTER XXVIII— DARK DEEDS, MURDERS, ETC 512 

Death of a Negro at Ladoga — Another Murder — First Murder In Montgomery 
County — Early Homicide— A Suicide's Odd Will — Failure of Circumstantial 
Evidence — Murdered For Two Dollars — Murder of Meyer Ham — The Camp- 
bell-Little Election Tragedy — Swindled by "Gold Brick" Men— A Hold-Up Man 
at Linden— A Celebrated Criminal Case— Convicts in the Penitentiary — A Later 
Tragedy — Past and Present of Tippecanoe County — The Battle of Tippecanoe. 



HISTORICAL INDEX 



A 

Agricultural and County Fairs 292 

Altitudes Above Sea Level 42 

Ancient Lake fand Boulders, An 43 

Andersonville Indiana Monument 180 

Artesian Wells 48 

As Viewed by Youthful Immigrant 79 

Autograph Letter 492 

Automobiles, Introduction of 305 

Attorneys, Honored List of 311 

B 

Bank of Kirkpatrick 370 

Bank of Linden 370 

Banks and Banking 367 

Baptist Church 253 

Bar of County 318 

Bench and the Bar, The 306 

'Black Hawk War 86 

Botanical Gazette, The 362 

Brick Works 467 

Brown's Dust 491 

Browns Valley 420 

Browns Valley Bank 370 

Brown Township 409 

Brown Twp., Early Industries 413 

Brown Twp., Early Settlement 413 

Brown Twp., Topography and Soil of- 410 
Brown Twp., Towns and Villages of_ 417 

Business Interests of 1913 393 

Business Interests, 1913 432 

C 

Campbell-Little Tragedy, The 518 

Census of 1910 486 

Central High School Building 212 

Christians, New Lights and Disci- 
ples, The 269 

Circuit Court Judges, The 310 



Citizens' Bank of New Ross 371 

Citizens' National Bank 369 

City Officials, 1913 476 

Civil War, The 90 

Clark's Expedition — Colonel George 
Rogers 28 

Clark Township 374 

Coal Creek Township 437 

Coal Creek— First Settlers 448 

Coal Creek, Towns and Villages of 453 

College Buildings 246 

Convicts in Penitentiary 523 

Corn Exchange Bank 371 

Corn Shucking "Bees" 452 

Cost of Running the County in 1831.. 58 

County Jail 53 

County Officers 81 

County Officers in 1913 61 

County Orphan's Home 57 

County Superintendents, Duties of— 191 

County Superintendents, First 189 

Court House, The First 50 

Court House, The Present 50 

Court House, Second 51 

Court Officers, 1913 319 

Crawfordsville Argus-News 358 

Crawfordsville, The Beginning of 458 

Crawfordsville Cemeteries 480 

Crawfordsville City Park 478 

Crawfordsville, Early History of 460 

Crawfordsville Examiner 358 

Crawfordsville Fire Department 477 

Crawfordsville Gas Light Co. 478 

Crawfords^■ille Heating Co. 479 

Crawfordsville Hospital 479 

Crawfordsville, Industries of 468 

Crawfordsville Journal 356 

Crawfordsville Ix)comotive 360 

Crawfordsville, Mayors of 475 

Crawfordsville News-Review 358 

Crawfordsville Public Library 481 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Crawfordsville Record 355 

Crnwfordsville Review 35S 

Crnwfordsville Schools, The 211 

Crawfordsville Star 360 

Crawfordsville State Bank 360 

Criminal Case. Celebrated 521 

D 

Daily News, The 359 

Darlington 431 

Darlington Echo 364 

Darlington State Bank 372 

Days of Sorrow 496 

Declaration of War 184 

Discovered by White Men 25 

Dow, Lorenzo 268 

Diinkard Church, The Burning of the- 258 



E 



Early Beef and Packing 466 

Early Incidents — 1 376 

Early Marketing 385 

Early Settlement of the County 63 

Early Settlers, Clark Township 375 

Early Tuition and Terms 239 

Educational Development 188 

Eighteenth Battery 175 

Eighteenth Battery Light Artillery— 102 
Eighteenth Regiment Infantry, three 

years 127 

Eighth Cavalry 130 

Eighty-seventh Infantry, three months' 

men 104 

Eighty-sixth Regiment 9S 

Eighty-sixth Regiment, three years— 144 

Eleventh Cavalry 156 

Eleventh Cavalry Regiment three 

years , 100 

Eleventh Regiment ; 94 

Eleventh Regiment Infantry three 

years 111 

Eleventh Regiment, for three months' 

service 93 

Elston National Bank 1 367 

Enlisted Men, Roll of 103 

Enrollment, Summarized 243 



F 

Faculty, The 1912 248 

Farmers and Merchants Bank, Dar- 
lington 372 

Farmers and Merchants Bank, La- 
doga 372 

Farmers and Merchants Bank, 

Wayuetown 371 

I'^armers and Merchants Trust Co. — 370 

Farmers Bank, X\^ingate 371 

Ferris Wheel 506 

Fifteenth Regiment 96 

Fifteenth Regiment Infantry 122 

Fifth Cavalry 147 

Fifth Cavalry Regiment 99 

Fifty-eighth Regiment 98 

Fifty-eighth Regiment Infantry, three 

years 136 

Fifty-first Regiment Infantry, three 

years 136 

Fifty-second Regiment 97 

Finances in 1912 59 

Financial Affairs, Past and Present — 57 

Fire of 1838, The 245 

First National Bank 368 

First Regiment Heavy Artillery 127 

First Settlement 71 

Fish and Game 69 

Fiskville School 215 

Flags, Display of 193 

Fortieth Regiment 96 

Fortieth Regiment Infantry, three 

years 1?>0 

Forty-ninth Regiment Infantry, three 

years 136 

Fourth Cavalry 143 

Founder of Crawfordsville, The 457 

Founding and Founders 226 

Franklin Township 427 

Franklin Township, First to Enter 

Land in 429 

Free Masonry 279 

Free Will Baptist Church, The 258 

Freighting and Railroad Building 297 

G 

Garfield Assassination 497 

Geology and Topography 40 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Germaji Baptist Societies 257 

Gold Briclc Swindle 520 

Government of the Northwest 30 

Grand Army Post at Crawfordsville— 181 

Grangers 2flO 

Grant, Death of General 498 

H 

Ham Murdered. Meyer 517 

Harmar, General 32 

Harney, Lake 412 

Haw Creek Academy 200 

Henry Ward Beeeher Chair, The 238 

Highland Building 215 

High School, The 215 

High Schools. Past Principals of 215 

Hold-up at Linden 521 

Horse Stealing 509 

Horse Thief Detective Society 508 

Hospitality Unexcelled 80 

Hot Water Cure 492 

Humane Society. The 480 

I 

Improvements. First 431 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows— 2.84 

Indiana, The Definition of 37 

Indiana Record 356 

Indian Burials 426 

Indians in Sugar Creek Township 402 

Indian Territory. Organization of — 34 
Interurban Lines 303 

K. 
Knights of Pythias 287 

L 

Ladoga Bank 372 

Ladoga Building and Loan Fund 373 

Ladoga, Fighting Whisky in 393 

Ladoga. Industries of 383 

Ladoga Journal ' 365 

Ladoga Rivals 387 

Ladoga State Bank 373 

Ladoga. The Town of 378 

Lincoln School Building 213 



Lincoln's Death 496 

Linden Advocate 365 

Linden. Leader and Reporter, of 365 

Liquor Drinking 70 

Logansport. Crawfordsville & South- 
western 301 

Lutheran Church 276 

M 

McKinloy, Death of President 499 

McMullen Tragedy 519 

Madison Township 398 

Madison Township. Towns and Vil- 
lages 400 

Market Quotations 490 

Medical Profession 320 

Meharry's Grove 452 

Members of the Boards to Date 217 

.Methodism. Jlontgomery County 259 

Mexican War. Only Survivor of 89 

Mexico. War with 87 

Miami Confederacy 527 

Military History of the County 86 

Mills and Factories 388 

Mills Building. The 213 

Minute Men 148-149 

Miscellaneous Churches 277 

Miscellaneous Xotes 243 

Montgomery Historical Society 484 

Montgomery Soldiers. List of 92 

Mount's Home. Governor 433 

Municipal History 474 

Murdered for Two Dollars 516 

Murders of Montgomery County 512 

N 

National Policies 26 

Natural Scenery 44 

Natural Summer Resort 416 

New Market 421 

New Richmond Enterprise 365 

New Richmond News, The 365 

New Richmond Record 363 

Newspaper, The First 35 

Ninth Battery 173 

Ninth Battery Light Artillery 102 

Ninth Regiment Infantry, three years. 105 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



o 

Octogenarians in Crawfordsville 471 

Officers and Faculty ' 239 

Officers. Roll of 92 

Old Settlers' Reunion 489 

Old Time Arithmetic, An 491 

One Hundred and Eightli Regiment — 148 
One Hundred and Eleventh Regiment- 149 
One Hundred and Fiftieth Regiment— 101 
One Hundred and Fiftieth Regiment- 165 
One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Regi- 
ment 102 

One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Regi- 
ment 168 

One Hundred and Fifty-sixth Regi- 
ment 172 

One Hundred and Forty-ninth Regi- 
ment 165 

One Hundred and Forty-ninth Regi- 
ment 101 

One Hundred and Nineteenth Regi- 
ment 150 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Regiment- 150 
One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Regi- 
ment 159 

One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Regi- 
ment 101 

One Hundred and Twentieth Regi- 
ment . 100 

One hundred and Twentieth Regi- 
ment 150 

One hundred and Twenty-fourth Regi- 
ment Infantry 156 

One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regi- 
ment 156 

One hundred and Twenty-third Regi- 
ment 156 

One Hundred and Thirty-third Regi- 
ment Infantry 158 

One Hundred Day Men 158 

Organization and County Government- 49 

Organization as a State 36 

Oulatenon Club 483 

P 

Papoose Buried 494 

Past Superintendents 215 

Patriotic Order Sons of America 482 



Pearl Hunters ' 47 

People's Banking Co., Darlington 372 

People's Press 361 

Physicians of 1913 352 

Physicians Who Registered 351 

Pioneer Educational Institutions 194 

Poor Farm and County Asylum 55 

Population of County 485 

Post Office History 472 

Pre-Historic Race 38 

Presbyterian Church, The 250 

Presidential A'ote 85 

Prison Deaths 176 

Proclamation, A 183 

Prohibition Vote 499 

R 

Ralroading 298 

Railroad Bridge Victims 386 

Railroads, Later 302 

Rebellion, Opening Scenes of the — 91 

Recruits 110 

Red Race, The last of the 36 

Resisting a Draft 178 

Reunion of Eighty Year Old Men ._ 487 
Ripley Tovroshlp, Early Settlement of- 407 
Ripley Township, Towns and HamletS- 408 

Riley Day 217 

Roster of Soldiers 185 

Roman Catholic Church, The 275 

S 

St. Clair and "Wayne Expedition 33 

St. John's Episcopal Church 277 

"Sang," Digging 488 

Scenes of Long Ago, The 75 

Schools of Today, 1913 216 

Schools, Present Condition of 209 

Scott Township 422 

Scott Township, First Events of 423 

Secret Societies 482 

Seminary and Academy, The 201 

Settlers in 1825 68 

Seventeenth Regiment Infantry, three 

years 127 

Seventh Cavalry 150 

Seventy-second Regiment Infantry, 

three years 137 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Sliannondale 433 

Sixteenth Regiment and Infantry, 

three years 126 

Sixty-third Regiment Infantry, three 

years 132 

Sliunl£ Farm 490 

Snake Story, A True 417 

Society of Friends 274 

Soldiers' Monument 179 

Sons of Veterans 182 

Spanish-American War 183 

Sperry Bridge, The Old 505 

Spirit of The Times, The 177 

Squirrel Hunt, A 376 

Stars and Stripes, Taking Down the__ 494 

State Bank of New Market 371 

State Internal Improvement 37 

State School Fund 193 

Storm. An Early 425 

Subscription School 190 

Sugar Creek and Its Treasures 47 

Sugar Creek Township 402 

Sugar Creek Township, Early Settle- 
ment 403 

Sugar Creek Township, First Events of 405 

Suicide's Will, A 515 

Sunday School Statistics 278 

Supreme Tribe of Ben-Hur 2S9 

T 

Tecumseh 527 

Temperance Waves 495 

Tenth Regiment, for three months' 

service 92 

Tenth Regiment, three months' men 103 

Tenth Regiment Infantry, three years. 106 

Thirty-eighth Regiment Infantry 139 

Thirty-fifth Regiment Infantry 139 

Thirty-first Regiment Infantry, three 

years 129 

Tippecanoe, Battle of 524 

Tippecanoe County, Past and Present 

of 524 

Tornado of 1S66 424 

Township Officers for 1913 62 

Township Organizations 429 

Township Organization 416 

Transportation 297 

True American, The 363 



TweuUetli Regiment Infantry, three 
years 127 

Twenty-first Regiment Infantry, three 
years 127 

IVeuty-second Battery, Light Artil- 
lery 103 

Twenty-sixth Infantry 128 

Tuttle Building, The 214 

V 

Underground Railroad 506 

TTniou Township 457 

United Brethren Church 276 

V 

Valuation in 1912 60 

Village of Plats 503 

Viucennes, Post at , 28 

W 

Wabash College Campus 244 

Wabash College Finances 337 

Wabash College, History of 218 

Wabash College, Objects of Founding 224 

Wagon-roads of County 61 

Walnut Township 439 

Walnut Township, Commercial Inter- 
ests of 445 

Walnut Township, Towns of 444 

Wanted : One Hundred Volunteers 178 

War Hand-Bill, Famous 178 

Water and Light Co. of Crawfords- 

ville, The 477 

Waveland Call 363 

Wavelaud Collegiate Institute, The.. 205 

W;ivclaud News 362 

Wayne Township 435 

Wayne Township, Towns and Villages 437 

Waynetown Democrat 364 

W.-iyuetown State Bank 371 

Wealthy Persons Montgomery County 493 

Wbitcomb, Governor 88 

Willson Building, The 214 



Young Men's Christian Association.. 483 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



A 

Agnew, Grant 725 

Alfrey. Henry tiOl 

Alfrey, Moses 603 

Alfrey. Jesse C. S6S 

Allnutt, Thomas J. 1143 

Anderson, William L. 1096 

Armantrout, James H 635 

Ashby, Edgar 1204 

Ashby. Eugene C. 1194 

Ashby Family's Ancestry 1186 

Ashby, Robert L. 101" 

Ashby. Thompson V. 1025 

Austin, Arehelaus C. 890 

B 

Balver, John S. 1100 

Ballard, Emerson E. S30 

Batman, William F. 1041 

Beeson, John H. 949 

Bell, John W. 735 

Bible. Richard M. 732 

Binford. David 716 

Birdcell, J. J. 620 

Bischof. Jacob 816 

Bischof, Louis 816 

Blue, James W. 698 

Boots, Eli 660 

Boots, James F. 659 

Bounell. H M i263 

Bratton, Charles L. 1113 

Bratton, Orpheus W. 1112 

Breaks, Alvin 643 

Breaks. Amos G. 900 

Breaks. Richard 644 

Britton, Everett L. 1183 

Bronangh, Charles T. 1128 

Brown. Edwin M. 612 

Brown, Capt George R. 656 

Brown, James L. 1270 



Brown, Rylaud T. 905 

Brown, William H. 872 

Bryant. William 790 

Bundy, Quincy E. 1198 

Bundy. William H. 987 

Burgin, Walter A. 673 

Burk, Joseph E. 623 

Butcher, William A. 711 

Butler, Charles E. S38 

O 

Ciiuipbell, David C. 982 

Canine, Cornelius L. 1053 

Canine, Jesse W. 589 

Canine. J. R. 590 

Carman, Ben.iamin F. 1009 

Carr. Capt. W. B. 843 

Carrick, Adam O. 690 

Carter, C. W. 1265 

Carter, James M. 1085 

Christ. Henry H. 921 

Click. Cecil C. 1067 

Clodfelter. Marion E. 818 

Clore, Doren 1141 

Clouser, Daniel 945 

Clouser. Ira 944 

Coleman, William R. 836 

Cook, C. M. 1261 

Cook, George H. 1136 

Cook. Grant 1075 

Cooksey, Thomas L. 647 

Coon, William S. 808 

Coons, John R. 1260 

Coppage, Llewellyn G. 1001 

Cording, Richard N. 880 

Corn, George W., Sr. 928 

Corn, William, Sr. 929 

Cowan, John M. 707 

Cox, Elijah M. 1271 

Cox. Ira 1008 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Coyner, Lucien D. 985 

Craig, V. E. 1032 

Crane, Jobn E. 809 

Crane, J. W. 1055 

Crabbs. Benjamin F. 687 

Crawford. Cbarles M 666 

Cummings, F. F. 812 

Curtis, Aetna B. 1170 

Custer, Franklin A. 1159 

D 

Davidson, David H. 892 

Davidson, Jesse F. 654 

Davidson. Samuel 654 

Davis, Jobn L. 594 

Davis, Kandolpb 595 

Davis, Robert T. 751 

Dean. Jobn W. 1049 

Dennis. Fred A. 878 

Dickerson, J. W. 960 

Dicks, William H. 640 

Donelson, Dr. Cbarles 0. 742 

Dunn, W. W. 589 

Dykes, J. E. 589 

Dykes, Samuel A. 1064 

E 

Eastlack. Allen E. 923 

Edwards, E. H. 614 

Edwards, M. E. 1216 

Elliott, Jobn W. 613 

Elmore, James B. 1050 

Elston. Isaac C. 692 

Endicott. William 968 

Engle, Bennet Beard 937 

Enoch, Abner P. 672 

Enocb, Darwin S. 664 

Enoch, David 672 

Enocb, George Allen 6S2 

Everson, Jobn P. 1117 

F 

Fisher, William 1080 

Flannigan, William 675 

Fletcher, Foster A. 680 

Fletcher, Joseph A. , 681 

Fogarty, John W. 703 



Foley, Andrew N. 942 

Foley, M. E. 1209 

Fraley. Samuel W. 1211 

Frantz, William M. 1027 

Fullenwider. Chalmers E. 950 

G 

Galey, Samuel W. 1240 

Gerard, David W. 1145 

Gilkey, Squire M. 724 

Godard, G. O. 989 

Goff, Charles M. 1168 

Gohman, Charles 917 

Goldberg, Joseph 903 

Goltra, Cbarles 1268 

Goodbar, Henry H. 1237 

Gott. William T. 744 

Grantham, Charles W. 918 

Gray, John S. 617 

Graham, George W. 1276 

Graham. John L. . 981 

Gray, Thomas W. 1068 

(iraybill, Josepbus 1189 

Gregg, Orpheus M. 1161 

Gregg, Samuel H. 1217 

Griffith, Ephriam 835 

Griffith Family. The 832 

Griffith, Thomas J. 832 

Griffith, Thornton 833 

Grimes, Lawson C. 679 

Grimes, S. E 700 

Grimes, William Clark 645 

H 

Ham. William S. 991 

Hamilton, Nathaniel 1024 

Hamilton, K. T. B. 791 

Hampton, S. A 962 

Hankins. Theodore 996 

Harding, John A. 964 

Harding, William S. 963 

Harper, Richard C. 966 

Harrell, Hezekiah F. 723 

Harsbbarger. George W. 1030 

Harvey, Frank W. 1234 

Harwood, John T. 783 

Haywood. Charles 1040 

Hatton, William M. 1167 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Heighway, John G. 1013 

Hernly, Abrnliam H. SOS 

Herron, Capt William P. 1201 

Hester, Elmer 1144 

Hester, James M. 1094 

Hioks, Charles 107S 

Hicks, Martin 10S8 

Hicks, Robert F. 1007 

Hicks, Samuel * 1084 

Hill, Clifton G 1107 

Hines. Linnaeus N. 748 

Hitchcock, James S. 827 

Hodgkin, Charles V. OIG 

Hodgkins. Robert H. 1170 

Holland, John D. 1090 

Hopping, John B. 1015 

Hornbeck, Jasper 886 

Hostetter, David 100.^ 

Hove.v. Edmund O. 848 

Hovey, Horace C. 864 

Howell, Gilbert 1050 

Hughes, David W. 1196 

Hughes, George H. 1253 

Hulet, Walter F. 010 

Hulett, Nathan 1008 

Hulett, Nathan 1043 

Hunt, Walter L. 870 

Hunter, Clyde H. S02 

Hurley, George D. 1213 

Huston. Thomas E. 1090 

I 
Irwin. Obed A. 501 

J 

Jarvis, William 1062 

Jeffries, Robert D. 120S 

Johnston, William H. 026 

K 

Kelly. James S. 058 

Kesler, Nathan G. 1139 

Kirkpatrick, Charles 122S 

Kirkpatrick, James W. 632 

Kostanzer, Anthony 567 

Kostanzer, H. P. .568 

Kostanzer, John E. 565 



Krilz. Francis W. 1247 

Kyle, Silas F. 1037 

L 

Lane, Hon. Henry S. 576 

Larrick, Robert H. 959 

Lawrence, Ed, 1126 

Layne, P. M S47 

Layton, Aaron 642 

Lee, Maurice J. 1206 

Lidikay, Jacob E. 1225 

Lidikay, M. H, 965 

Linn, Asbury 1176 

Llewellen, Thomas 610 

Long, Luther R. 820 

Long, Oath 1230 

Loop, Andrew 721 

Loop, Willinm C. 720 

M 

McBee Walter H. 1056 

JlrCihe, James 1254 

:\Icr'ain, Arthur A. 873 

McCain. Fred T. 875 

McCart.v, Col. W. M. 57S 

McCay. Carter D. 710 

MeClnniroch. L. B. 737 

McClamroch, William B. 736 

McClnskey. Capt. E. P. 712 

McClure, David F. 1275 

:\IcCrea, Ed. T. 1121 

McDowell, Grant 684 

McGaughey, Henry C. 1133 

:\rclntire, Forglson G, 840 

Mackintosh, George L. 704 

McLoed. Le.«]ip M. 1200 

McLned. Oliver C. 731 

McMains. Robert 670 

McWilllams, W, E, 814 

Ma hoy, George 978 

:\rartin. William H. 1076 

Martin. William K. 1232 

Martz, Jerome B. 1251 

May. Bertrand E, 933 

Meharry. Isaac N. 1120 

Merrell, Basil T. S03 

Merrell. Daniel 804 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Merrill, William S. 626 

Miles, William J 1219 

Miller, Edward S. 1123 

Miller, John W. 1091 

Miller, John W. 1132 

Miller, Leroy L. 793 

Milligan, Frank 0. 637 

Milligan, James K. i 637 

Milligan, Samuel J. 1137 

Mills, Caleb 648 

Minnich, Andrew 1106 

Minnieh, Charles A. 1104 

Mix, Robert F. 676 

Morin, Fielden E. 956 

Morris, Sylvester C. 622 

Mount, Gov. James A. 568 

Mount, Atwell 569 

Mullen, Albert 668 

Munhall, Samuel 825 

Munhall, Thomas T 824 

Myer, David 974 

Myers, Ben S. 810 

Myers, Daniel A. 1022 

Myers, Franz O. 1180 

Myers, George F. 934 

Myers, William D. 1066 

N 

Nash, Omer D. 984 

Nees, Milton L. 941 

Nicholas, James M., Jr. 1174 

Nicholson, Thomas B. 1231 

Nutt. Jonathan 1057 

O 

Olin, Leveritt W. 1016 

Osborne, James H. 1273 

Osburn, Othel L. 1000 

Otterman, James M. 1034 

Otterman, Lewis 1035 

Otterman, Samuel H. 1046 

Otto, Louis W. 885 

Owen, Lewis W. 634 

P 

Paddack, John A. 972 

Peacock, Samuel R. 998 



Peck, Dumont M. 948 

Peebles, Benjamin 686 

Peebles. Robert W. 685 

Peterson, Clifford V. 1238 

Peterson, James A. 994 

Pope. Bruce C. 1262 

Pugh, Frank D. 729 

Q 
Quillin. Charles N. 734 

R 

Ramsey, George P. 815 

Ream, Elmer W. 823 

Remley, Ambrose 600 

Remley, Daniel 806 

Remley, Fred S. 611 

Remley, Harry C. 1160 

Remley, James 60S 

Remley, John 912 

Remley, John E. 608 

Remley, John W. 1220 

Rice. Edgar A. 930 

Rice. Isaac 1224 

Rice. John W 743 

Rice, J. N. B. 706 

Rice. Jonathan 706 

Roach, Henry J. 846 

Robinson. Fred B. 1245 

Rosebaum, John O. 1069 

Ross. Charles W. 828 

Royalty. John F. 1048 

Rusk, John H. 1244 

Rusk. Squire 920 

Russell, Byron R. 914 

S 

Sanders. James N 844 

Schenck, Faye O. 879 

Schoen, Walter 1259 

Schwindler, Dr. C. G. 694 

Schwindler, Henry 695 

Scott, Harry L. 925 

Servies. Henry D. 932 

Servies, William T. 1081 

Shanklin, Fred M. 599 

Shanklin. T. C. 599 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Shotts, Arthur R. 1071 

Simpson, Alfred L. 719 

Small. John W. 715 

Smalley, Alfred 1191 

Smith. Alaric M. 1221 

Smith, Daniel 1120 

Smith, David C. S61 

Smith. Floyd L. 727 

Smith, George W. 5S2 

Smith, Samuel 681 

Snow. William 975 

Snyder. Redden B. 616 

Stackhouse. Frank 976 

Steele, George W. 954 

Stipe, John 936 

Stipe. Joseph W. 936 

Stoddard, James M. 624 

Stoddard, Orin 625 

Stoner. Samuel D. 1223 

StucUey, Milton H. 1072 

Switzer. Abraham C. 629 

Switzor, Benton 1275 

Symmes, F. M. 8S8 

Symmes. Samuel D. 888 

T 

Talbot. Henry H. 1124 

Taylor. James 952 

Taylor, James F. 1019 

Taylor. John 1019 

Teague, James F. 740 

Templeton. Samuel P. 953 

Tennant, Henry E. 1172 

Thayer. Caleb 992 

Thomas. Judge Albert D 688 

Thomas. James Ray 631 

Thomas, Oscar D. 663 

Thompson. Henry T. 1029 

Thompson, Nehemlah 702 

Thompson, Samuel H. D 70 

Thompson. Taylor 1112 

Thornberg, H. H. 728 

Todd. Isaac S. 1184 

Todd. John W. 1188 

Tribby, Leander 1114 

Turnipseed. Nathan C. 979 



U 
Utterback, Albert J. 628 

V 
Vail, James A. 904 

W 

Walkup, B. F 697 

Walkup, Ward B. 696 

Wallace, Gen. Lewis 562 

Walts, Edgar 747 

Warbrltton, John F. 822 

Warbritton, Samuel N. 800 

Warfel, Jacob F. 1005 

Warner, Lee S. 895 

Washburn, William W. 1074 

Waugh, Frank W 969 

Welty, George B 661 

AVert, Asher 939 

Wert, Martin V. S96 

White. George R 882 

White, Israel H 1101 

White, Michael D 883 

White, John M 1116 

White, William S. 1102 

AVhitloek, Ambrose 574 

Williams, Charles N 781 

Wideuer. ClarencS A. 738 

Williams, George T. 876 

Williams, Henry 781 

Williams. Robert H. 946 

Willis. Abner D. 1241 

Willis, Nathaniel P 1242 

Wilson, George W. 588 

Wilson, Henry Lane 777 

Wilson, Hon. James 592 

Wilson. John L. 787 

Wilson, James D. 1134 

Wilson, Hon. John 584 

Wilson, Samuel M. 588 

Wilson. Col. W. C 587 

Wingate, John C. 1192 

Woods, Michael 639 

Woody, William C. 678 

Wright. James 718 





^/aLw ^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL Continued 



HENRY LANE WILSON. 

Henry Lane Wilson, present American Ambassador to Mexico, was born 
in Crawfordsville in 1857, his father being James Wilson, who was born in 
the same place and whose ancestors came to Indiana through Kentucky from 
Virginia, and his mother, Emma Ingersoll, of a New England family. James 
Wilson, the father, graduated at Wabash College at the age of seventeen in 
1842 and from the Indiana Law University in 1844. He later served two 
terms in Congress, winning his election the first time over Daniel W. Voor- 
hees, the Democratic candidate, on the issue of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill 
and State Sovereignty. In that day the joint discussion between these two 
young leaders of opposite political opinions attracted attention throughout the 
North and is still remembered by some of the older people in Indiana. At 
the outbreak of the War of the Rebellion, James Wilson entered the ranks 
of the Union Army and went to the front, from whence he was recalled by 
President Lincoln and commissioned to defend the Emancipation Proclama- 
tion throughout all New England, Pennsylvania. New York and Ohio. At 
the close of the war he was brevetted Brigadier General. Some time after he 
took an active and high part in the councils of the Republican party and would 
undoubtedly have been sent to the Senate or made Governor but for his oppo- 
sition to negro suffrage without educational preparation. He was appointed 
Minister to Venezuela by Andrew Jackson and died in that country at the 
early age of forty-two, at almost the beginning of what would undoubtedly 
have been a distinguished career. 

Henry Lane Wilson passed all of his earlier years, with the exception 
of two years in Venezuela, in Crawfordsville. receiving a primary education 
in the public schools, and entered Wabash College in 1875. At that time 
Joseph F. Tuttle was President of the College and Edmund O. Hovey, Caleb 
S. Mills, John L. Campbell and Samuel S. Thompson were yet in the full 
vigor of their usefulness and affording splendid examples of rugged piety and 
devotion to duty and of dignity and profound learning, and it is to the deep 
impressions made by these men that he owes in a considerable measure for 



7/8 MOXTGOMERY COUXTY, INDIANA. 

whatever success he has achieved in Hfe. During his college years he divided 
his time and interest between extensive and thorough reading and politics and 
political discussions, never missing a political speech that he could possibly 
hear and listening with eagerness and profit to the homely discussions of the 
farmers and odd characters for which Crawfordsville used to be famous. His 
education and ecjuipment for the world did not come easily, as at the thresh- 
hold of his college career the family fortune was largely swept away. To 
the devotion, energy and self-sacrifice of his mother, he ascribes all of his suc- 
cess in life as well as the inculcation of those principles of morality, honesty 
and truthfulness without which no man can attain lasting success. 

Among the members of his class who still remain in Indiana are : Albert 
B. Anderson, United States District Judge, Arthur B. Milford, Professor 
of English Literature at Wabash College, and James H. Osborne, Professor 
of Latin in the same institution. Others who were in college at the same 
time, though not classmates, w^ere : Vice-President Thomas R. Marshall, 
Charles B. Landis, Albert Baker, James Daniels, Harry J. Milligan and 
Harold Taylor. 

In his earlier days he listened to the political speeches of Oliver P. 
Morton. Thomas A. Hendricks, Benjamin Harrison, Joseph E. MacDonald, 
and the gifted, but erratic, Thomas H. Nelson, one of his predecessors in 
Mexico. He also received valuable political instruction from Col. Henry S. 
Lane and from his uncle, William C. Wilson, of Lafayette, a distinguished 
lawyer and orator. He made his first political speech at the age of twenty 
at Waveland, in Montgomery county, in company with James A. Mount, 
who afterwards became Governor of Indiana. From that time on he was 
engaged in politics, and his public speaking has been carried on with greater 
or less success until the present day. 

Following his graduation from college he secured a position as en- 
grossing clerk in the State Legislature at Indianapolis and later entered the 
law office of MacDonald & Butler. He soon purchased the Lafayette Daily 
Journal, and, as it did not prove a successful venture, sold it a year later 
without loss. In 1885 he married Alice Vajen, a daughter of John H. Vajen, 
a prominent and well known citizen of Indianapolis, and moved to the town 
of Spokane, in the eastern part of the state of Washington. There he re- 
sumed the practice of law, making a specialty of land practice. In this he 
made a pronouced success and his fortunes improved rapidly. 

About this time Spokane began the marvelous growth which has now 
made it one of the great cities of the Union, and he commenced investing in 
real estate with immediate and astonishing success. In the course of a few 



MOXTGOMERV COUNTY, INDIANA. 7/9 

years he amassed a large fortune and became interested in banks, buildings, 
real estate and promoting companies. In the panic of 1893 ^^^ of this fortune 
was swept away, not through unwise investments or inability to meet his 
own debts, but through the failure of two banks in which he was heavily in- 
terested and b\- reason of being called upon almost simultaneously to bear 
the burden of the failure of other men for whom he stood as endorser or 
surety. He gave up all of his property and afterwards paid more than one 
hundred thousand dollars to clear his name and credit. During this period 
he was largely identified with the development of the state of Washington 
and with its politics, and his name was connected with a majority of meas- 
ures of a public character in that section of the country. Politics to him 
at that time was simply a diversion or perhaps a practical method of being of 
service to his brother, John L. Wilson, who was then, and continued to be 
until his death, an active figure in that state. 

When Benjamin Harrison was elected President, our subject had been 
living some time in the state of Washington, and he, with his brother, 
managed to create a sentiment favorable to Harrison's nomination, which 
resulted in his having a third of the state delegation. When Harrison was 
elected, he spontaneously offered Mr. Wilson the post of minister to Vene- 
zuela, but, as he had no ambition in the direction of the diplomatic service at 
that time, he declined the offer. \\'hen William McKinley was elected 
President, Mr. Wilson took a large part in the manageinent of the campaign 
in Washington, Idaho and IMontana, and also spoke continuously for forty 
days in the face of generally hostile and sometimes boisterous free-silver 
audiences. Early in 1897, President McKinley offered him the post of min- 
ister to Chile, and he accepted, going to that country with his mother, wife 
and three children. He remained at that post for eight years, his services 
being in every way successful and useful to his government. He came in 
time to exert great influence — an influence born of confidence and faith with 
the Chilean people, and was able not only to render substantial aid to the 
business and political interests of his own country, but to contribute in a large 
measure on two occasions to prevent war between Chile and the Argentine 
Republic. Mr. Wilson's respect and liking for the Chilean people was very 
profound and this feeling was reciprocated, and the Chilean government has 
never ceased to follow him with marks of respect and esteem. Only recently 
the University of Chile, the oldest in America, conferred upon him the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy, Humanities and Literature, a degree that has never 
before been conferred on an American. During Mr. Wilson's residence in 



780 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Chile he was twice transferred to other posts, once to Portugal and once to 
Greece, but was allowed to remain in Chile upon his own request. In 1905 
President Roosevelt promoted him from Chile to Belgium and upon an- 
nouncing the appointment to the Associated Press along with those of two 
other gentlemen, said, "These appointments are not made for political con- 
siderations but solely for meritorious service performed." This was surely 
true in Mr. Wilson's case, since his appointment was opposed by both Sena- 
tors from Washington. 

Mr. Wilson remained in Belgium five years, and during that time saw 
King Leopold pass away and. as the special ambassador of the President, 
stood at the right hand of King Albert when he was enthroned. He had 
really only one important question to handle while in Belgium, namely : the 
Congo question, a most delicate and trying piece of diplomacy, which was 
managed to the entire satisfaction of the President and Secretary Root. The 
locality of the post gave him access to many opportunities for study, obser- 
vation and travel in France, Italy, Germany, Holland and England, and the 
experience was altogether a useful one. 

In 1910 President Taft, after tendering Mr. Wilson two embassies in 
Europe which he could not accept for financial reasons, sent him as ambassa- 
dor to Mexico. Since he has been at that post, four Presidents have held 
office in that country : Diaz, De la Barra, Madero and Huerta. Three revo- 
lutions have been inaugurated, and the times have been troublous and dan- 
gerous. There are forty thousand Americans in Mexico ; nearly ten thousand 
in Mexico City. There is a larger investment of American capital there than 
in any other country and there is double the amount of work in that embassy 
than in any other of our diplomatic posts. Mexico is, therefore, aside from 
the glamour of social precedence which surrounds a European post, the most 
important diplomatic post in the service. Mr. AVilson's work in Mexico 
always had the full approval of President Taft and his cabinet, the former 
saying a short time after his retirement from office, "^^^hat a misfortune it is 
that our rotten system of politics seems to require changes in our 
diplomatic service and thus bring about the loss of a man of the experience 
and ability of Mr. Wilson, who has served his country so faithfully for so 
many years and deserves the respect of his country's people. Men of his 
type should never be forced out of the field of usefulness." 

Mr. Wilson has been sixteen years continuously in the diplomatic service, 
is in time of service the senior member of the diplomatic corps, and has 
served longer in these capacities than anyone else since the foundation of 
our government. 



MONTGOMERY COUXTV. INDIANA. 781 

CHARLES X. WILLIAMS. 

In placing the name of Charles N. Williams in the front rank of busi- 
ness men who have at one time or another honored Montgomery county with 
their residence, simple justice is done a biographical fact, recognized by all 
who are familiar with his history. A man of rare soundness of judgment, 
wise discretion and business ability of a high order, he has managed with 
tactful success important enterprises, and is at this writing president of the 
Farmers Trust Company of Indianapolis. What of the man and what of his 
work? This is the dual query which represents the interrogation at least 
nominally entertained whenever that discriminating factor, the public, would 
pronounce on the true worth of the individual. The career of Mt. Williams 
indicates the clear-cut and distinct character, and in reviewing the same 
from an unbiased and unprejudiced standpoint, interpretation follows fact in 
a straight line of derivation. In this publication it is consistent that such a 
review be entered, and that without the adulation of ornate phrases, for he 
has stamped the mark of definite accomplishment on the highest plane of 
industrial activity. 

Mr. Williams was born, April lo, 1856. on a farm in Tippecanoe county, 
Indiana, and his family moved, when he was two years old, to Crawfords- 
ville, Indiana, where his father purchased the northwest corner of Wabash 
avenue and Grant avenue, and there they lived until 1870. He is a son of 
Henry and Martha Barnum (Haight) Williams. The father was born on 
July 4, 181 8 in Maryland, and his death occurred on February 17, 1904. The 
mother w^as born in Connecticut, on June 14, 1816, and her death occurred on 
May 27, 1884. These parents grew to maturity in the East, received good 
common school educations and were married in Connecticut, when they came 
west and located in Lafayette, Indiana, and in 1858, they located in Craw- 
fordsville, M^ontgomery county, having engaged in the mercantile business in 
Lafayette. 

The mother of our subject was twice married, first, to John F. Caven, by 
which union six children were born, only one of whom. Eva Caven, who has 
remained single, is living; she resides in Crawfordsville, in the old home 
located at the northwest corner of Walnut and College streets. After Mr. 
Caven's death she married the father of our subject, and to this union two 
children were born. Laura, wife of Benjamin F. Crabbs, of Crawfordsville; 
and Charles N., of this review. 

Charles N. Williams received a common school education and later at- 



782 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

tended Wabash College. On April 6, 1898 he married Margaret Lawrence 
Doll, who was born in New Albany, Indiana, and is a daughter of James A. 
and Marinda (Martin) Doll. She graduated from the high school at 
Lafayette, Indiana, later attended Purdue University there, also an art insti- 
tute in Chicago. She is a lad_y of culture, talent and refinement. 
The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 
After Mr. Williams left college he went into the post-office at Craw- 
fordsville as clerk, in which capacity he served for three years, and later went 
into the real estate business. He studied law, but was not admitted to the 
bar, finally deciding upon a business instead of a legal career. In 1881 he 
assisted in the organization of the Citizens National Bank of Crawfords- 
ville, and did much to make it a success. In 1888 he was appointed state 
correspondent for the Provident Life Insurance Company, of Phila- 
delphia. It was his business to invest the monev of that company in farm 
and city properties in Indiana and Illinois, and he has continued, in a measure, 
at least, to fill this position to the present time or for a period of twenty-five 
years, his long retention being sufficient evidence of the implicit trust reposed 
by the company in his business ability and integrity, and during that period 
he has done much to increase the prestige of the company in these states. 

In 1895, seeking a larger field for the exercise of his talents, Mr. Wil- 
liams removed to Indianapolis where he has since resided. Soon after arriv- 
ing here he opened a private banking house under the firm name of C. N. 
Williams & Company, of which he was sole owner and proprietor. It was a 
success from the start and continued with dver increasing popularity as a 
private bank until 1905, .when he organized the Farmers Trust Company of 
Indianapolis, with which he consolidated his private bank, and since that 
time Mr. Williams has been president of the Farmers Trust Company, 
and his able, conservative and judicious management has made it a strong 
and rapidly growing concern, and it now ranks among the leading and most 
popular institutions of its kind in Indiana. It is incorporated at one hundred 
thousand dollars. 

Mr. Williams is also state correspondent for the Prudential Life Insur- 
ance Company, and a number of private investors of New York City. He 
is president of the Marion Title & Guarantee Company, and under his able 
management it has been very successful from the start and its business now 
covers a wide field. 

Fraternally, Mr. Williams is a member of the Masonic Order, including 
all the subordinate lodges in Crawfordsville, including the Blue Lodge, the 
Knights Templar and the Order of Eastern Star. Also belongs to the 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 783 

Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Murat Temple at 
Indianapolis. He is prominent in Masonic circles, having attained the thirty- 
second degree. Religiously, he is a member of the First Presbyterian church 
of Indianapolis, and is treasurer of the same. He belongs to the Columbia 
Club, the University Club and the Country Club, all of Indianapolis. He 
holds membership with the Sons of the American Revolution. Politically, 
he is a Republican. 



JOHN THOMAS H.VRWOOD. 

Few dealers in live stock in Montgomery county and western Indiana 
have ever been so widely known or done a more extensive lousiness than John 
Thomas Harwood, of Crawfordsville, one of the enterprising, progressive 
and at the same time genial and obliging gentlemen who is deservedly popular 
with a very wide acquaintance. 

Mr. Harwood was born in Brown township. ^lonlgumery county, April 
23, 1862, and he is a son of Jackson and Carolina (Harrell) Harwood. The 
father was a native of Ohio and he came to Brown township, this county, in 
an early day and became the owner of eighty acres, and here farmed until the 
winter of i86'i when he enlisted in Company C, Fortieth Indiana Volunteer 
Infantr}', and served faithfully for six months when he was sent home on ac- 
count of sickness. His death occurred here in August, 1862. He left a 
widow and se\en small children, the oldest under fourteen years of age. The 
mother of our subject was also a native of Ohio. Siie was a woman of cour- 
age and fortitude and by a hard struggle managed to rear her family in com- 
fort and respectability, and she departed this life on the home farm in 1881. 

John T. Harwood remained on the home place until he was nineteen 
years of age, assisting with the general work and attending the common 
schools during the winter months, then came to Crawfordsville and began 
working for a stock buyer, which he continued for a period of ten 3'ears, giv- 
ing his employer entire satisfaction, then, lia\ing learned the ins and outs of 
•the business he branched out for himself, and has continued to the present 
day with ever increasing success. He operates in Montgomery and adjoin- 
ing counties, and his total average business by months runs over twenty thou- 
sand dollars. He is one of the best known stock men in western Indiana 
and it would be difficult to find a more excellent judge of all grades of live- 
stock. If all the stock purchased by him and shipped to the various markets 
during his business career were to be placed in one train it would reach over 



784 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

eight hundred miles. He has won the confidence and good will of all the 
farmers because of his honest dealings with them, and is regarded by all as 
a man of unquestioned integrity and honesty of purpose. He makes trips 
with live stock to Chicago, Indianapolis and East Buffalo, New York. 

Politically, Mr. Harwood is a progressive Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he belongs to the United 
Brethren church. 

Mr. Harwood was married in April, 1892 to Alice Wright, a native of 
Tennessee. 



HON. JOHN L. WILSON. 

In the largest and best sense of the term, the late John Lockwood 
Wilson, United States Senator from the state of Washington, proprietor of 
the Seattle P ost-Intelligenccr , one of the greatest of American newspapers, 
and for many years one of the most prominent and useful citizens of Mont- 
gomery county, Indiana, was distinctively one of the notable men of his day 
and generation, and as such his life record is entitled to a conspicuous place 
in history, both local and national. As a citizen he was public spirited and 
enterprising to an unwonted degree; as a friend and neighbor, he combined 
the qualities of head and heart that won confidence and commanded respect; 
as a newspaper proprietor he had a comprehensive grasp upon the philosophy 
of journalism, and he brought honor and dignity to the public positions he 
filled with distinguished success; he was easily the peer of his professional 
brethren throughout the Union, and as a servant of the people in high places 
of honor he had no superiors. 

Hon. John L. Wilson was born August 7, 1850. He was the son of 
James Wilson, who was the son of John Wilson, for whom the Senator was 
named. The grandfather came from Kentucky to Montgomeiy county, 
Indiana, when this section of the state was a wilderness and sparsely settled, 
and here James Wilson grew to manhood, and after his marriage he built a 
home in Crawfordsville on the north half of the quarter of the block which 
skirts the west side of Grant avenue between Wabash avenue and Pike 
street. It was a one-story house which later was purchased and repaired 
and which is now the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity house. Here Senator 
Wilson was born. Later his father built a house on West Wabash avenue. 
It is asserted by some of the older citizens that James Wilson was the first 
white child born in Crawfordsville. When James Wilson grew to manhood 



MONTGOMERY COrXTV, INDIAXA. 785 

he became one of the leading lawyers and most powerful speakers in west- 
ern Indiana. He was the associate and practiced his profession at the same 
bar with Daniel W. Voorhees, Benjamin Harrison and Joseph McDonald, 
and was the peer of any of these distinguished citizens. In a race for Con- 
gress, Mr. Wilson defeated Mr. Voorhees. This campaign was a hotly 
contested one and the joint debates of these candidates is still a subject of 
interest to the older citizens of the country. James Wilson was later ap- 
pointed minister to Venezuela, South America, by President Andrew John- 
son, and while living there he died, and was buried there, but Ins remains 
were later removed to Oak Hill cemetery, in Crawfordsville. 

John L. Wilson grew to manhood in Crawfordsville, and here received 
his educational training in the public schools and Wabash College, taking the 
classical course in the latter and was graduated with the class of 1874. He 
was a stanch supporter of his alma mater ever afterward. He never forgot 
Crawfordsville, and he told a friend just before his departure for Washing- 
ton City of his plans to purchase a suburban home near the city of his birth 
and spend his declining years in it. He had even carried the plan so far as 
to have the place he wanted to buy selected. 

In October, 1880, Mr. Wilson entered upon his political career when he 
was elected to the legislature of the state of Indiana. He there met the late 
Benjamin Harrison and a strong friendship grew out of this acquaintance. 
It was through the influence of Mr. Harrison when he was a United States 
senator that Mr. Wilson was named land agent at Colfax, which was then a 
frontier village in the territory of Washington. When our subject received 
this appointment he was in the abstract business in Crawfordsville and he 
fully expected to return when he left. But he failed to do so. He was sent 
to Congress as a delegate from Washington and was elected to Congress 
when that state was first admitted into the Union. Later he was chosen 
United States senator and held his office for four years, giving eminent sat- 
isfaction to his constituents and winning a national reputation as an inelli- 
gent, far-seeing, honorable statesman, who had the welfare of the people at 
heart. He discharged his duties with an ability and fidelity that won the 
admiration and confidence of all classes. In 1910 he started on a trip to 
Europe, but was recalled when he reached Crawfordsville, Indiana, by an 
urgent telegram from some of his influential political friends in Seattle, who 
insisted that he make the race for senator again. He reluctantly consented 
to sacrifice his personal comfort and gi\e uji the trip and went back to make 
(.SO) 



786 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the race for the nomination, but was defeated by a narrow margin. This 
ended his personal poHtical activities. 

The Senator's domestic Hfe began when he married Edna Hamihon 
Sweet, a lady of talent and culture, and a daughter of Samuel Hartman, a 
well known Crawfordsville business man. She survives as does one daugh- 
ter, Mrs. H. Clay Goodloe of Lexington, Kentucky. Henry Lane Wilson 
is the only brother surviving. Howard Wilson, another brother, died in 
Crawfordsville about twenty years ago. Henry Lane ^Vilson is the present 
ambassador to Mexico. 

Senator Wilson and the Post-Intclligcnccr, the great newspaper he built 
up in Seattle, were a power in the formation of the northwest. He was abso- 
lutely fearless in conducting his paper and many a man unworthv of the 
political preferment he sought felt the sharp sting of the editorial lash in that 
influential journal. Senator Wilson and his wife had started on a trip 
around the world, and they spent several days in Crawfordsville, visiting old 
friends, early in November, 1912, and from here they proceeded to Washing- 
ton, D. C, where the Senator was suddenly stricken and died with little warn- 
ing on Wednesday morning, November 6, 1912, at the age of sixty-two years. 
The body was brought back to Crawfordsville, Indiana, for interment in Oak 
Hill cemetery besides the graves of his father and mother. The funeral was 
one of the largest ever seen in this section of the state, and the floral tributes 
were never surpassed in either number or beauty, many of them coming from 
Seattle, Spokane, and other parts of the nation where the Senator was held 
in high esteem. Among the distinguished men attending the obsequies were 
Gov. Thomas R. Marshall and Charles W. Fairbanks, ex-Vice-President of 
the United States. Of the deceased the latter said: "We have learned with 
inexpressible sorrow of the death of Senator Wilson. This comes as a dis- 
tinct shock to me for it was only a few days ago that I had the pleasure of 
chatting with him in this city. He was one of the best men I ever knew — 
a friend whom I esteeined in the \'ery highest degree." 

President and Mrs.' Taft were among those who sent elaborate floral 
tributes, in memory of the great man who reached the highest office in the 
gift of the American people save one, a man who had a mind and a love for 
public affairs. His was an extraordinary series of achievements, made in 
competition with bright and ambitious minds in a community not exceeded 
in the world for enterprise and enthusiasm for success. We must ascribe to 
tlie man who did so much in thirty years certain qualities which differentiate 
him from the ordinary man. He climbed with dauntless persistence from 
comparative obscurity to large and honorable publicity. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INDIANA. 787 

In the course of his funeral oration. Dr. (leort^e I. ewes Mackintosh, 
president of Wabash Colieye. .said, among- other things : 

"Senator \\'ilson was sincere and (_le\oted in friendship. Tn him a 
friend, even a political friend, was nut a mere stepping-stnnc. lie haled in- 
gratitude and avoided it. In the most passionate and seltish game known to 
men he came through with the heart whole and the hands clean. Even when 
out of office and apart from direct political influence, no man was more 
sought by those desiring advice and help. The people of the country in which 
he lived and wrought for thirty years belie\ed in him. Xo one could ask for 
a greater reward. 

"We would expect a man of -Mr. Wilson's temperament to be of gener- 
ous disposition. Here we shall not be disappointed. He l>elie\ed in the 
great human right, a decent living. He urged that a fair day's work de- 
manded fair pay. But what is far more important he illustrated his theory 
in every-day life. In the great publication enterprise he helped to fashion 
and perfect in the city of Seattle every man he paid to the limit of his earn- 
ing, and ever}- bit of machinery is the latest and most efficient type. But 
this is mere justice to employes and the public. Generosity is something 
finer and of a more subtle beauty, even than justice. It is akin, if not iden- 
tical, with mercy and mercy is the crowning quality of God himself. It is a 
great good fortune to those who are nearest our departed friends that they 
can think of him as one who loved much, who forgave much and was kind. 
God is merciful and far down the highway which all humans must travel 
and beyond that turn in the way which we call death we confidently hope to 
find those whom we ha\-e loxed and lost. In parting with Senator W^ilson, 
one who labored much, loved much and was generous, though he doubt- 
less failed some, we say goodbye, but not farewell." 

In private and political life Senator Wilson was a man of the strictest 
integrity, a bitter opponent of dishonesty, both public and private, a militant 
apostle of the Republican party which his father helped to found, died as he 
had lived, fighting for the principles he had espoused. The son of a father 
who had devoted his life to public service and helped to form the greatest 
political party of the United States, Senator \\'ilson will long be remen-ibered 
as a nian of fearless honesty, one w ho performed great services for the young 
state which he represented at the national capitol, a fighter for all that was 
just and helpful to the commonwealth. In 1894 when he appeared before 
the state convention at Spokane, he said of the trust reposed in him as Con- 
gressman from the state, 'You have clothed me with honors and authority, 



7oO MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and now 1 return the trust to you, unblemished, just as j'ou gave it to me." 
The utterance characterized his life. 

Pending formal action by the board of trustees of the Seattle Chamber 
of Commerce, of which Senator Wilson was an active member, the commit- 
tee on state legislation of which the former Senator was chairman, and the 
committee on national affairs, of which he was acting chairman, together with 
the offices of the chamber met and adopted the following resolutions : 

"In the death of Senator Wilson the state of Washington and the 
Chamber of Commerce sustained a loss which in many ways is irreparable. 
Since his retirement from active participation in politics two years ago, Sen- 
ator Wilson had devoted practically all of his talents, time and indomitable 
energy toward the promotion and upbuilding of this state, and the territory 
of Alaska. He spent the whole of last winter and the preceding fall as the 
agent of this chamber, in organizing and combining the commercial bodies 
, of the entire Pacific coast in behalf of Alaska and pressing that territory's 
claims for relief before the various Congressional committees in Washington 
City. It is the simple truth to say that in three months Senator Wilson 
spent at the nation's capital in behalf of the measures in which the city of 
Seattle and the territory of Alaska are vitally concerned, he accomplished 
more in the way of actual results than all other efforts combined in the past 
five years. He wielded an influence at a time when he was an active mem- 
ber of the upper body. 

"His intense loyalty to this city, state and the entire Pacific coast is 
exemplified by such monuments as the Puget Sound navy yard, Seattle assay 
office and other government institutions, the existence of which are due 
either wholly or largely to the influence, resourcefulness and persistence 
wielded by him in the halls of Congress. 

"All his public utterances in the past two years have been an appeal to the 
patriotism of the people of this nation, and particularly to the younger men. 
The lofty sentiments which he expressed in recent addresses in this city, par- 
ticularly at times when disloyalty and disrespect to the American flag was 
being evidenced in some quarters proved an inspiration to all patriotic men. 
His reverence for the constitution and its underlying principles as the 
foundation upon which the liberties of the American people rest, was breathed 
in his every public and private utterance." 

The following appeared editorially in the Post-Iutclligcncer, and is from 
the pen of Scott C. Bone, present editor of that great daily, he having form- 
erly been a resident of Indiana, and a man who knew the lamented Senator 
very intimately : 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 789 

"To write of Senator Wilson today is more than heart can bear. So 
many memories of him crowd clear and fast; so many visions of him as he 
was last among us, that words lag, thoughts grow dim, wavering in tear 
mists, and the hand, hardened to the play of life and deatli wants courage 
for the task. We in this otifice knew him best and loved him best. Here 
he was father, brother, comrade, friend, and now, when grief is lieavy on us, 
when silent sorrow is sweet with consolation, we must treat, wlio was so 
dear, as a part of the dark day's work. 

"He is gone. This we know. Never will lie be with us again. All the 
machinery of this newspaper, which was a part of him, his pride and his am- 
bition, will move today, tomorrow, and the ne.xt da)'. But 'the Senator' will 
be no more. The nation has lost a patriot, the state a loyal, tireless servant 
and the city an eager friend, but the Post-Intelligencer has lost a heart and 
spul, a big, warm heart and a fine, clean soul. We cannot stop to mourn 
him, we to whom he was so very dear in lite. We can but go on as he would 
have wished us, telling the news of the day, the big and the little things of 
life, making a newspaper. And so, though dulled with pain, we will. 

"No man in this state heard the news that John L. Wilson was dead but 
to pause and pay a tribute to him who had marked himself so deeply in the 
history of this common-wealth. Yet how idle to say that he will be missed 
and mourned. How futile any computation of the widespread regret! How 
empty-sounding the generalities of encomiums ! Every person in this state 
knows what manner of man John L. Wilson was, some better and more 
truly than others, perhaps, but all know him as a big, honest, fearless citizen, 
and can appraise their own loss. 

"John L. Wilson loved his God, his country and his fellow man. He 
was true to himself, and of consequence to all else was true. The old strain 
of Nonconformist blood that ran in his veins held him fast to his ideals. 
Right to him was a thing to be fought for without compromise, and friend- 
ship was a duty, holy and enduring. It was for what he held to be right 
and in the cause of friendship that he fell and died as he himself would have 
wished, amid the clash of big events. Warned long since tliat his heart 
could stand no strain, certain only of defeat. Senator Wilson, weak ami 
weary though he was, against all pleas and advice went into the national con- 
test undaunted. And now like a good soldier he lies, taking his rest. 

"To make any adequate summing up of his life would need be the work 
of a biographer less hurried than a newspaper writer. To even enumerate 
his services to state and city is beyond newsjiaper limitations. Time will do 



79° MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

him full justice and his name will loom large among the men of Washington. 
"Just now there is small solace in that thought to those in whose lives 
he played a daily part. We can't forget that he will not come, bantering and 
genial, into the editorial rooms at night, with a playful word for a copy boy, 
an anecdote for a reporter, or a mock anger to tease some editor. 'The 
easy boss' has said his last 'Good-night, boys," and has gone out into the long 
darkness, and we hope he hears us when we say, 'Good-night, Senator.' " 



WILLIAM BRYANT. 



Whether the elements of success are innate attributes of the individual, 
or whether they are bred by the force and progress of circumstances, it is 
impossible to clearly decide; this much is certain — a great deal depends upon 
the person. In the person of the worthy old pioneer, now deceased, whose 
name heads this sketch, we have a sample of the race of people to whom this 
country is indebted for its development and progress. To such as William 
Bryant, Indiana owes much. Here and there, scattered over the broad 
acres of untilled and unbroken land, he and his people toiled — cleared, 
grubbed, ditched, burnt, and hewed — gradually opening the way, the result 
of which we see today in the broad and fertile farms of Montgomery county. 
Such were the pioneer farmers. They did not care for public gaze or appro- 
bation : their lot was an unpretentious one, and so they lived, quietly, happil)-, 
and in the love of their Master who guided their destinies. 

William Bryant was born in Ross county, Ohio, on March 28, 1824, the 
son of William and Catherine (Lancisco) Bryant, who came to Ohio from 
the state of Virginia in a very early day. William Bryant, the subject of our 
sketch, came to Montgomery county, Indiana, as a boy from Ohio. At the 
age of twenty-one years his father gave him a team of horses and five hun- 
dred dollars cash. With this nucleus he built up an estate valued at two 
hundred thousand dollars. Starting in a log cabin hewn from the forest ad- 
joining the prairie to which he came, he started the unequal struggle for the 
mastery of a new country. His energy and perseverance, always rewarded 
with substantial profit, gave courage to others and facilitated the settlement 
of this part of Indiana. 

The first purchase that Mr. Bryant made was of forty acres of land. 
From his childhood days Mr. Bryant had been acquainted with the cattle 
business and when he came to the Hoosier state the whole land was a pasture 




yyyiy 



792 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

selected for he possesses the proper attributes, and is a good mixer, thus en- 
joying the friendship and good will of a vast acquaintance. 

Colonel Hamilton was born on May 7, 1852, in Montgomery county, 
Indiana. He is a son of Nathaniel and Jane (Keeney) Hamilton. The 
father was born in Ohio, and the mother was born in Kentucky. The father 
was a carpenter by trade. Politically, he was a Republican, but was not a 
public man. He was twice married. 

Colonel Hamilton received a good education in the common schools. He 
was married first to Lizzie Barnett, a native of Montgomery county. She is 
now deceased. Our subject was married the second time, his last wife being 
Rose Ballard, born in Montgomery county. Mrs. Hamilton was educated in 
the public schools. 

Eight children were born to Colonel Hamilton and his first wife, six of 
whom are still living, namely: Mabel, Jennie, Albert, Hector B., Jessie and 
Wallace. To the last marriage one child was born, Walter. 

Our subject made his start in life on the farm and this work has claimed 
his chief attention through life until today, having prospered with advancing 
years he is the owner of several good farms in Montgomery county, and he 
spends his summers in the country and his winters at his commodious home 
in Crawfordsville. He started as an auctioneer in 1878, having had a great 
deal of natural ability in that direction, as all must have who make a success, 
and he soon had quite a reputation here in his native county, and his reputa- 
tion continued to grow, covering surrounding territory, and soon he found 
that his services were in great demand in Indianapolis, and he has been a suc- 
cessful and popular auctioneer in that city for the past twenty years, and he 
is well known throughout the state. One of his finest farms is that of three 
hundred and fifty acres in the western part of the county which is well im- 
proved and under a high state of cultivation. He believes in adopting all 
modern methods, wherein they are applicable to farming in this section of 
the country, and he studied modern methods of all k ids. He is a lover of 
fine live stock and some excellent grades are always to be seen on his farms. 

Colonel Hamilton was reared in the faith of the Methodist church. 
Fraternally, he belongs to Lodge No. 223, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and to the Tribe of Ben-Hur, also the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. Politically, he is a Progressive, and he made the race for sheriff 
of Montgomery county on that ticket in the campaign of 1912, but was de- 
feated with the rest of the ticket, although making a splendid race. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 793 

LEROY L. MILLER. 

All credit is due a man who succeeds in tiiis untoward world of ours in 
spite of obstacles and l)y persistency and energy gains a competence and a 
position of honor as a man and citizen. The record of Leroy L. Miller, 
widely known to the publishing world of western Indiana, where he has for 
decades been regarded as an exceptionally adroit printer, is that of such a 
man, for he came to Montgomery county in the days when she was beginning 
her rapid growth following the pioneer period, and here worked out his way 
to definite success. He quickly adapted himself to changing conditions, and 
has labored so consecutively and eiTectively that in due course of time he be- 
came proprietor of a thriving business in Crawfordsville. 

Mr. Miller was born on November 7, i860 at Cambridge Cit}-, Wayne 
county, Indiana. He is a son of Abraham and Sophia (Potts) Miller. The 
mother was born in October, 1834, in Chillicothe, Ohio, and when a young 
girl she moved with her parents to Logansport, Indiana, where she grew to 
womanhood, received her education and there she and Abraham Miller were 
married in the year 1848. The mother of the subject died on Julv 12, 1883, 
in Crawfordsville. 

Seven children were Ijorn to Abraham Miller and wife, named as fol- 
lows; five of them still living: Mary died in Logansport; Charles A. died in 
Indianapolis; Nora, Leroy L. (subject), Isaac Newton, living in South 
Bend; Otis is in the grocery business at Frankfort; W'illiam R., born I-'ebru- 
ary 3, 1879, is in the office with his brother, Leroy L. 

The father. Abraham Miller, was a contractor and builder l)y occupa- 
tion and became well known in this section of the state. Fraternally, he was 
a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, the Knights of Pythias, and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was a charter member of the 
Knights of Pythias here. During the Civil war he enlisted in an Indiana 
regiment in 1864, and served very faithfully. 

In view of the prominence of Abraham Miller in this locality and of the 
good he did as an Odd Fellow and the splendid example he set as a citizen, 
the biographer deems it entirely appropriate to here reproduce the memorial 
address delivered by J. R. Etter before Bethesda Encampment No. 15, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, at Mount Zion church, Crawfordsville, June 
24, 1906. He said: 

"By the courtesy of Bethesda Encampment No. 15. I have been re- 
quested to prepare a few brief remarks on the life work of Patriarch and 



794 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA 

Brother Abraham Miller, deceased. I accepted the charge, feeling sensibly 
my inability to render to his memory even a tithe of the excellencies which 
his noble, self- sacrificing life deserves. I feel that honor should have been 
assigned to older and wiser heads than mine — to some of the old and true 
patriarchs who had so long labored side by side with him in the cause of 
humanity, practicing friendship, love and truth, — faith, hope and charity. 

"Patriarch Miller was born in Germantown, Hamilton county, Ohio, 
April 21, 1905, being at the time of his death a few days over eighty- four 
years old. Though old in years, in his happy and joyous nature, he was ever 
a boy when with the young, feeling that it was his duty to mingle with them 
on their own level, to joke and have fun with them, to cheer them on to 
better and nobler lives, to make them feel that they need no fear of him on 
account of his gray hairs, but that he was their friend and counselor at all 
times. By virtue of this one trait in his character, he was enabled to do 
much good among the rising generation. He was never too busy to give a 
smile or kind word to a child, to a youth or to one of mature years — no one 
spoke to him that they did not get a kind and courteous answer. 

"His parents moved from Ohio to Cambridge City, Indiana, in 1826. 
He worked on his father's farm until he was nineteen years old, and then 
went to Logansport, Indiana, being gone two years before his parents knew 
where he was. When they had located him they sent G. W. Miller on horse- 
back all that distance to learn of his condition — to know what he was doing. 
Mr. Miller arrived there September 6, 1848, just two days before Patriarch 
Miller was married to Sophia Potts, wath whom he lived a little over thirty- 
five years. To them five sons and two daughters were bom. All the sons 
became Odd Fellows. Can a stronger proof be offered of his devotion to 
the Order than that he led five sons into its fold? He lived in Crawfords- 
ville forty year.s — long enough that all might be able to measure his good 
or bad qualities. He was a positive man ; when he saw wrong he did not 
hesitate to condemn it in the most positive terms, and when he saw good, he 
was ready to praise it — thus he was a man whom everyone knew where to 
find. He was not a friend to your face and an enemy to your back; he did 
not hide his light under a bushel to please the public; but he did what he 
thought was best for the individual and community, regardless of what might 
be said about him. Oh, how much better would the world be, if all men 
could be so easily found — could be relied on to stand by their convictions. 
When he formed a friend.ship, or entered into an alliance with anyone, he 
was never knewn to betray it, but he stood on the full measure of his promise. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 795 

What a happy, contented life he must ha\e h\x'cl ! Is it nut worthy our 
emulation ? 

"In trying to hnd out when Patriarch Miller was initiated into Odd 
Fellowship, and when he joined the encampment, I wrote to the secretary 
of Wayne Lodge, No. 17, Cambridge City, Indiana, also to the scribe of 
Hormah Encampment, No. 11, at that place. Both of these informed me 
that their records had been burned up in 1876, and that they had no way of 
telling when he joined either the Subordinate Lodge or the EncamjMnent 
there, Init they atlded that old members said that he was a memlier of the 
Subordinate Lodge and Encampment before the records were Ijurned. The 
secretary of Wayne Lodge added, 'But, from all to whom I have talked, I 
learn that he was a good and true Odd Fellow.' 

"Can I say more than this — that he was a good and true Odd Fellow? 
Can you think of a higher tribute to any man, than that he was a good and 
true Odd Fellow? If a man lives up to the teachings of Odd Fellowship, 
he must be one of God's noblest sons. After much investigation, I have 
ascertained from reliable authority, Patriarch Miller joined Wayne Lodge, 
No. 17, 1855, and that he affiliated with Hormah Encampment, No. 11, 
1837. Patriarch Miller was admitted to Bethesda Encampment, No. 15, at 
Crawfordsville, December 15, 1868, and was mustered into Canton Fidelitv, 
No. 50, September 8, 1901, Fie was a member of Mai'tha Washington Re- 
bekah Lodge, No. 13. He was a Past Grand and a Past Chief Patriarch, 
having received all the honors that a Subordinate Lodge and Encampment 
could confer on him. 

"He placed his foot on the first round of the ladder of Odd Fellowship 
in \\'ayne Lodge, No. 17, where man was represented as in darkness and in 
chains; he gazed there on the emlalem of the last resting place of man, and 
was restored to light and liberty. He was taught to faithfully regard the 
mysteries of the Order as sacred — he learned the lessons of the Past Grand. 
Then he journeyed on, and the love of Jonathan and David was exhibited, 
and he learned the lesson w'hich he never forgot. He traveled down the 
road to Jerico — oh, how many of us travel that road, and how many are 
beaten and robbed on the way! He saw the Israelite wounded and bleeding 
on the highway : he saw the Priest and Le\ite pass by on the other side ; 
he saw the Good Samaritan pour balm intu his wounds, take him to the inn 
and pa}' for his care. He learned that the true priest was not of the temple, 
and the true Levite not of the altar. As a good Samaritan he went about 
doing good. No Odd Fellow was ever sick within his reach, that he did 
not visit almost daily. The principles of truth, as taught in our Order, were 



796 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ever regarded by him in all his dealings with his fellow men. Truth with 
him was an imperial virtue. 

"When he had learned the lessons of friendship, love and truth, as 
taught in the Subordinate branch of the Order, he longed to know more, and 
entered the Encampment, serving his time as a herdsman, visiting Abraham's 
tent, partaking of the symbol of hospitality. He passed to the Golden Rule, 
where he was instructed in the principles of toleration and had impressed on 
his mind the beautiful lesson, "Do unto others as you would that others 
should do unto you.' He was exalted to the Royal Purple Degree, traveling 
across the wilderness of Paran, meeting and overcoming the difficulties on 
the way, and learning that the evil reports so often circulated against men, 
are not always tnie. Thus faith, hope and charity were added to his store 
of knowledge — the greatest of which charity, which was his guiding star 
throughout his life. 

"He was mustered into Canton Fidelity, No. 50, September 8, 1901, 
and was an honored Chevalier at the time of his death. Thus he had ad- 
vanced, step by step, through all tlie gradations of Odd Fellowship, until he 
has fully attained a knowledge of its intrinsic excellencies, of its adaptation 
for the promotion of good will among men, and of its fitness as a minister 
in the trials and adversities which are inseparable from human life, and that 
it thus presented a broad platform upon which mankind could unite in 
offices of human benefaction. 

"On the evening of January 29, 1902, it being the forty-first anniver- 
sary of Crawfordsville Lodge, No. 223, brother Abraham Miller was pre- 
sented with a 'Veteran Jewel', which emblematical of twenty-five years or 
more of continuous membership in the Order. During all these twenty-five 
years and more, he had been in good standing, had paid his tithe to assist his 
brothers in all the adversities that fall to human life. This is the best evi- 
dence we have that he learned well the lessons of friendship, love and truth — 
three cardinal virtues that go to make up the sum of human life, that bind 
up the wounds of distress, soothe the weary heart, and make life worth the 
living. No more constant friend could anyone have than he was. His love 
for his fellow man should be to us a guiding star for our actions along the 
journey of life. He was one of the most regular attendants at lodge in all 
the branches. If he was not there, the first question was, 'Is he sick?' To 
visit the sick and relieve distress was his great aim in life. Even in his old 
days the weather was never too bad for him to visit a sick brother almost 
every day. His constant looking after the sick became so well known that, 
when there was any doubt as to a sick brother's condition, everv member 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 797 

instinctixely would say, 'Brother Abraham Miller will know.' He was always 
busy; he was industrious; he never loafed when there was anything to do; 
and let me say, in passing, that an industrious man lias no time to gossip 
about his neighbors or to meddle with their business. 1 have not the talent 
of a Raphael, or might have painted a picture more pleasing to the eye — I 
have not the oratory of a Demosthenes, or 1 might have done him more 
justice in words. But I have said enough, and said it truthfully, that those 
who knew him can fill in between the lines, and thus finish the story of this 
grand and useful life devoted to amelioration of his fellow men. 

"Although a peace-loving man, he never forgot the injunction that 'you 
can not become an Odd Fellow in spirit and in truth, unless you are grateful 
to your Creator, faithful to your country, and fraternal to your fellow man.' 
In the late war, he gave his service for the cause of the Union, enlisting in 
Company H, One Hundred and Forty-seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, and was honorably discharged at the end of that bloody conflict. 
As Odd Fellows, we are taught 'To be faithful to the country in which we 
live.' How well he learned the lesson recited above, was pro\'en Ijy his 
offering his life for his country. 

"The life and labors of Patriarch Miller should be a talisman to point 
out to us the way we should go. He has crossed over the great sea that 
divides the now from the future. Our feeble eulogies can not make him 
Ijetter or worse — now. But what lessons can we, as Odd Fellows, learn 
from his life! One is that we should recognize the good qualities of a jjrother 
while he lives — should give him praise for what he does ; this will make him 
know his efforts are appreciated by us. .\nother is that we should emulate 
his example and 'do unto others as we would that others should do unto us.' 
If his life-work taught us only this one thing, he did not live in vain. When 
the spark of life had fled from him and he was but inanimate clay, we cast 
flowers on his bier. Oh, how much more happy would he have been if we 
had scattered flowers along his pathway while he lived — flowers of gratitude 
and appreciation for what he was doing. How much nmre would all of us 
do for humanity, if only our brothers would show that they realized our 
worth. But how silent they are, till the clods of the valley cover us from 
the sight of human eyes. Let us, as Odd Fellows, adopt a new tablet on 
which shall be written, 'the good that each member does' — while he lives." 

Leroy L. Miller, the immediate subject of this sketch, was seven years 
old when his parents brought him to Crawfordsville in 1867. Here he grew 
to manhood, received a common school education, and here he has spent most 
of his life ever since. He began in the printing business in 1875, remaining 



798 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

thus engaged until 1883, mastering the ins and outs of the same and getting 
a good start in hfe. He then entered the same field of endeavor for himself 
in 1884. but soon he went to Peru, Indiana, where, with a partner, he started 
The Peru Daily Journal, but returned to Crawfordsville in the spring of 
1885 and purchased the business he formerly owned. In 1888 his business 
was christened the New Indiana Printing Company. It is a private business, 
Mr. Miller being the sole manager and his energ\' and good judgment has re- 
sulted in building up a very large and rapidly growing business. His plant is 
well equipped with all modern presses, styles of type and other necessaiy ap- 
paratus found in an up-to-date printing house, insuring prompt and high- 
grade work, and only skilled help is employed. Besides his large printing 
establishment he owns a comfortable home in Crawfordsville. 

Mr. Miller was married on Apri 30, 1885, to Harriet A. Binford. She 
was born on February 17, 1863, in Montgomery county. She is a daughter 
of Caleb and Emily Jane (Allen) Binford. The father was born on April 
22, 1834, and the mother was born on October 30. 1835. The death of 
Caleb Binford occurred on January 11, 1879, and his wife followed him to 
the grave a few months later, dying on August 18, 1879. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Miller, namely : Bin- 
ford R., born February 20, 1887, received his education in the public schools 
and Wabash College, and he is now associated with his father in the man- 
agement of the Indiana Printing Company; Agnes Emily, born October 17, 
1890, is a graduate of the high school; Hugh H., born March 12, 1893, is a 
graduate of the high school and a student in Wabash College at this writing. 

Politically, Mr. Miller is a Republican, and fraternally he belongs to the 
Masonic Order. Montgomery Lodge, No. 50, also the Council, Chapter and 
Commandery and is a Shriner; he is also a member of the Tribe of Ben-Hur 
and the Modern Woodmen. He holds membership with the Center Presby- 
terian church in Crawfordsville. 



DAVID H. REMLEY. 



It is a matter of doubt which is the greater heritage, a distinguished 
name or a goodly estate. Some persons would choose one and some the 
other, depending wholly on their feelings and judgment combined. But 
wben the two are sent down to descendants together, the permanent standing 
of such descendants in the community will never be questioned, so far as the 
heritage is concerned. The average citizen of the United States can hand 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 799 

down no greater heritage to his children than an unblemished reputation, as 
has been done in the Reniley family, one of the best known, oldest, and most 
highly honored in Montgomery county. David H. Remley, the immediate 
subject of this sketch, was fortunate in being the son of such a worthy char- 
acter as John Remley, who, for a long stretch of years was one of the most 
representative citizens of this county, a man whom to kmiw \\;is tr> trust and 
admire, for he was enterprising, genial, neighbnrly. kind and public-spirited, 
never failing to lend such aid as was possible in furthering any principles of 
good. The subject of this sketch, one of our worthiest native sons, most 
substantial agriculturists, and widely known citizens, has long ranked among 
the leading men of affairs here, and it is to such enterprising spirits as he, 
his father, and brothers, that this locality is indebted for its marked and con- 
tinuous growth and for the high position it occupies as a center of agricul- 
ture, live stock and industrial activity. He has always been held in the high- 
est esteem by the people of this locality owing to his life of industry, public 
spirit and exemplaiy habits, and thus for many reasons he is eminently 
entitled to a conspicuous place in the pages of the present biographical com- 
pendium. 

David H. Remley was born in Union township, Montgomery county, 
Indiana, December 21, 1S44. He is a son of John and Sarah (McCain ) Rem- 
ley. In view of the fact that a complete sketch of John Remley and family 
appears on other pages of this \-olume, it is not deemed necessary to repeat 
same here. 

David H. Remley was reared on the home farm and here he has always 
resided, never caring to follow the wanderlust spirit to unexplored fields or 
much less to the false allurements of the city. When a boy he assisted with 
the general work on the farm and he received his education in the district 
schools. On March 10, 1870 he was united in marriage to Elizabeth A. 
Busenbark. She was a native of Montgomery county, Indiana, where her 
people have long been well known, and here she grew to womanhood and 
received her educational training. 

To our subject and wife one child has been born, James E. Remley. 

Mr. Remley has kept the old homestead well improved and under a high 
state of cultivation, so skilfully managing the same that it has retained its 
original strength and fertility of soil. He carries on general farming on an 
extensive scale and has paid special attention to handling li\'estock, of which 
he is a good judge. Everything about the place denotes good management 
and good taste. He is one of the leading members of the local Presbyterian 
church. 



OOU MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

SAMUEL N. WARBRITTON. 

One of the venerable agriculturists of Montgomery county and one of 
her worthiest native born sons is Samuel N. Warbritton, of Scott township, 
a man who has lived to see and take part in the great development that has 
characterized this nature-favored Wabash Valley country, he having come 
down to us from the pioneer period, his life of eighty-two years being 
fraught with blessings to those with whom he has come into contact, for he 
has sought to live uprightly and honorajsly and faithfully discharge his every 
duty as a public-spirited citizen. In the development and upbuilding of the 
community in which is situated his home, Mr. Warbritton has ever borne his 
part, and his faithful performance of the duties of citizenship deserve all 
credit. It has often been said that the farmers are the backbone and strength 
of a country's prosperity, and this has been proven to be true time and again 
in the history of nations. In the person of the subject we see one of those 
who, following that peaceful vocation, have "builded wiser than they knew," 
and have left to their children and country the benefits accruing from their 
years of well-spent toil and effort, and are therefore eligible to representation 
in the pages of the histories of their country. 

Mr. Warbritton was born on December 3, 183 1, in Scott township, 
Montgomery county, Indiana, and is therefore one of the oldest native born 
citizens in this township or even the county. He is a son of Peter and Phoebe 
(Nelson) Warbritton. The father was born in Virginia, from which state he 
came to Kentucky when four years old and there grew to manhood. The 
date of his birth was February 13, 1804. His death occurred in 1897. The 
mother of our subject was born in Kentucky in the year 1814, and her death 
occurred in 1886. These parents spent their lives engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, and by hard work and persistency established a good home. They 
were the parents of thirteen children, nine of whom are still living, including 
all the sons, eight in number. These children were named as follows : 
Martha J., who married a Mr. Grimes, is deceased; Samuel N., of this 
sketch; John, Reuben, Charles; Sarah Frances is the only surviving daugh- 
ter; Henry, Andrew J., Minnie, Cynthia Ann, and Mahala are all three de- 
ceased ; Daniel and George are the two youngest. 

Samuel N. Warbritton grew to manhood in his native community and 
when a boy he assisted with the general work on the home place. His educa- 
tion was limited to the common schools in his district and to one term in the 
graded school at Ladoga. The home school he attended was in a log cabin, 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 8oi 

with split logs for benches, greased paper for \vindo\v panes and a wide fire- 
place in one end of the room, logs six feet long being used in building fires. 
There were no free schools in those days, only subscription schools, each 
pupil paying a small tuition fee. 

On December 20, 1855, Mr. Warbritton was united in marriage to 
Amelia Ann Seaman, who was born in Brown township, Montgomery county, 
November 12, 1836. She was a daughter of Benjamin F. and Winifred 
(Jones) Seaman. Her education was also obtained in the log school houses 
of her native community. Ten children were born to our subject and wife, 
four of whom are still living, namely : Mary is deceased ; Emma, bom 
October 22, 1857, married W. C. Kern, and they live in New Market, this 
county; Allilia L. is deceased; Lula was next in order; John F. and Albert 
are both living; Bertha, Pearl, Stella and Mabel are all deceased. 

Mr. Warbritton began farming for himself early in life, and this con- 
tinued to be his vocation until 1910, when he retired. He was a hard worker 
and good manager, and a large measure of success as a general farmer and 
stock raiser attended his efforts. He farmed in Parke county a few years, 
living in the city of Rockville. He became the owner of one hundred and 
seven acres of valuable and productive land in Scott township, adjoining the 
town of New Market, every foot of which is tillable. He sold this farm in 
1910. In connection with general farming and stock raising, Mr. Warbritton 
bought and shipped live stock for a period of twenty years, becoming one of 
the best known stock men in this part of the country. He owns a comfort- 
able home in New JMarket, also three acres of valuable land within the limits 
of the town. 

Religiouslv, he is a member of the Christian church, and was a trustee 
in the same for a period of thirty years. He has always been a Republican 
until the fall of 1912, when he allied himself with the new Progressive move- 
ment. He feels that he has always been on the right side religiously and 
politicallv. He was one of the organizers of the Republican party back in the 
fifties. He has long been influential in local political affairs, and has served 
seventeen years in Montgomery county as justice of the peace, having been 
elected in 1862. He has served in this capacity in both Scott and Brown 
townships. He gave eminent satisfaction in this office, his decisions being 
noted for their fairness and comprehensive knowledge of the basic principles 
of jurisprudence, and few of them ever met with reversal at the hands of a 
higher tribunal. He regrets to say that he feels he has seen the beginning and 
the end of the great Republican party. He has always been a great reader 
(51) 



802 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and is exceptionally well posted on current events. He says he has read 
everything from "Peck's Bad Boy" up. He has an excellent library, and he 
is an intelligent and interesting conversationalist. Notwithstanding their 
advanced ages, the subject and wife in the summer of 1912 traveled through 
Illinois, Missouri, Kansas and Iowa alone, and very much enjoyed the trip. 
They have comparatively good health, are alert and active in both mind and 
body, and they are often visited in their cozy home in New Market by their 
many friends, their home being one of the best, largest and neatly furnished 
in this town. It is a nine-roomed, two-story home in a large, well-kept lawn 
and with a fine barn in the rear of the well-located lot. They are a fine old 
couple, and it is a pleasure to know them and share their hospitality. 



CLYDE HARVEY HUNTER. 

The prosperity and substantial welfare of a town or community are in a 
large measure due to the enterprise and wise foresight of its business men. 
It is progressive, wide-awake men of affairs that make the real history of a 
community and their influence in shaping and directing its varied interests 
is difficult to estimate. Clyde Harvey Hunter, formerly a hotel man, now 
engaged in the lumber business at the town of Wingate, Montgomery county, 
is one of the enterprising spirits to whom is due the recent substantial growth 
of the town whose interests he has at heart. With a mind capable of plan- 
ning, he has a will strong enough to execute his well- formulated purposes 
and his great energy, keen discrimination, and sticktoitiveness have resulted 
in material success. Many of these commendable qualities he seems to have 
inherited from his worthy father, who has also long been one of the substan- 
tial citizens of Paxton, Illinois. 

Clyde H. Hunter was born in Belle Rive, Illinois, December 5, 1883. 
He is a son of William Harrison Hunter, who was bom in Rush county, Indi- 
ana, in 1847. He has for many years been one of the enterprising business 
men of Paxton. Illinois, where he is living a retired life. 

The mother of our subject was known in her maidenhood as Olive Rot- 
ramel, and she was born in Illinois in 1855. These parents are now living in 
the town of Paxton, Illinois. William H. Hunter has always followed the 
lumber business and is one of the best known lumber men in this section of 
the state. During the Civil war he enlisted in 1861 in the Forty-seventh 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was later transferred to the Ninety-fourth 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 803 

Infantry. He saw nearly three years of acti\e service, proving to be a gallant 
and faithful defender of the Union. 

Three children were bom to William H. Hunter, two of whom are de- 
ceased, namely: Clyde Harvey of this review; Harry, and Fred H., deceased. 

Clyde H. Hunter received a good common school education, later at- 
tending the Culver Military College, then spent a year in the University of 
Wisconsin at Madison, also one year in the University of Illinois at Cham- 
paign. Thus well equipped for life's duties he took charge of the Inn Hotel 
at Wawasee, Indiana, which he conducted successfully for a period of two 
years. On January i, 191 2 he came to Wingate and took charge of his 
father's lumber yard, which ix:)sition he still holds, and is doing much to 
further the prestige and business of the same, being in partnership with his 
father. They own the only lumber yard in Wingate. They own a large, 
substantial brick building, and they handle on an average fifteen thousand 
feet of lumber. This yard was purchased by the father of our subject in 
1909. 

Clyde H. Wingate is a Republican ])olitically. He belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and fraternally is a member of the Masonic 
Order. 



BASIL TR.ACEY MERRELL. 

There is no positive rule for achie\'ing success, and yet in the life of the 
successful man there are always lessons which might well be followed. The 
man who gains prosperity is he who can see and utilize the opportunity that 
comes in his path. The essential conditions of human life are ever the same, 
the surroundings of individuals differing but slightly, and when one man 
passes another on the highway of life to reach the goal of prosperity before 
others who perhaps started out in life before him, it is because he has the power 
to use advantages which probably encompass the whole human race. Today 
among the prominent and successful agriculturists and business men of Union 
township, Montgomery county, is Basil Tracey Merrell, who maintains his 
pleasant home in Crawfordsville. The qualities of keen discrimination, sound 
judgment and executive ability enter very largely into his makeup and have 
been contributing elements to the material success which has come to him. 

Mr. Merrell was born in Wayne township, this county, July 17, 1853. 
He is a son of Daniel and Anna (Tracey) Merrell, a pioneer and highly re- 
spected farming family of Wayne township. The father was born in Butler 



804 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

county, Ohio, in 1819. His grandfather was a native of England, and died 
there at an advanced age. Benjamin Merrell, the paternal grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch, was a native of Ohio, being a representative of one 
of the first settlers of that state, and from there he came with his family to 
Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1827, locating among the pioneers, being one 
of the first settlers in what is now Ripley township, entering land from the 
government on the Perryville road, and here his death occurred a few years 
later before he had finished the hard task of developing the place from the 
wilderness. It was in the year 1833 that he died, but his widow survived 
many years, dying at an advanced age in 1879. Six children were bom to 
them, namely: Daniel, father of our subject; Sarah, who married William 
White, of Illinois, and died in Wayne township, this county, Anna, who first 
married a Mr. Boyd, and after his death became the wife of a Mr. Brown, who 
died while on a trip to California; Effie who married a Mr. White and lived 
in Illinois thereafter until her death; James, who was born after the family 
came to Indiana, established his home in Grant county, and who married 
Rosanna Reede; and John, who was also born in this state, was a soldier in 
the Union army during the Civil war, and died from a disease contracted while 
in the army. 

When Daniel Merrell started out in life for himself, he went to Wayne- 
town, where he worked at the cooper's trade. Saving his earnings, he subse- 
quently purchased eighty acres of land, continuing to work at his trade until 
he had paid for the place. As he prospered' through hard work and good man- 
agement, he added to his original eighty, from time to time, until he became 
the owner of one hundred and one acres of valuable land, and this he placed 
under good improvements and a fine state of cultivation. While living in 
Waynetown, fire destroyed his residence, but nothing daunted, he forged ahead 
and became a man of easy circumstances, building a substantial residence and 
barn on his farm in 1880. 

Daniel Merrell and Ann Tracey were married in Wayne township, this 
county in 1843. She was a daughter of Basil Tracey and wife. After a 
happy married life of eighteen years, Mrs. Merrell was called to her rest in 
1861. Eight children were born to them, namely: Mary Elizabeth, born 
in 1844, married a Mr. Shipman, a farmer of Benton county, Indiana; Sarah 
Ann, born in 1847, died in 1848; Lydia, born in 1849, married J. H. Biddle, of 
Benton county; Thomas, born in 1851, died in 1852; Basil T., subject of this 
sketch; Nancy A., who was born in 1856, died in 1886; William B., who was 
born in 1858, married a Miss Rusk, of Moundsville, Missouri; and John D., 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 805 

who was born in i860, married Maggie Johnson, and lie established himself 
on his father's farm. Daniel Merrell, father of the above named children, 
was a second time married, in 1863, this time to Mary Combs, who was a 
native of Kentucky. In 1S91 his second wife died. 

Daniel ]\lerrell was a Democrat in politics, and a Baptist in religious mat- 
ters. He took the interest of a good citizen in local public affairs and held a 
number of minor offices, having for many years discharged the duties of justice 
of the peace and assessor, also supervisor of his township. He was known to 
all his neighbors as a man of unblemished reputation, kind, honest and chari- 
table. He was summoned to his eternal rest in 1897. 

Basil T. Merrell grew to manhood on his father's farm and there he as- 
sisted with the general work when a boy, and he received a common school 
education. He left the farm when sixteen years of age and learned the 
carpenter's trade, which he followed for some time, finally branching out into 
the contracting business which he followed with success for four years, then 
entered a furniture store, in connection with which he had an undertaking 
establishment, at Waynetown, and this line of endeavor he continued for a 
period of fifteen years with much success, then he purchased the old home farm 
which he has continued to operate, keeping it well improved and under a high 
state of cultivation, and in connection with general farming he has handled 
a good grade of live stock. In company with William Rider he organized 
the Waynetown Bank, of which he became vice-president, spending twelve 
years in the bank and on the farm, making both a pronounced success. In 
1898 he was elected county treasurer in which ofiice he sensed two years with 
much satisfaction to his constituents, and they re-elected him to the same 
important position in 1902, and again in 1906, thus serving six years in this 
office in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the praise 
of all concerned. 

Mr. Merrell assisted iriithe organization of tlie Crawfordsville State Bank 
in 1904, since which time he has served as director in this popular institution. 
All the while he has continued to manage his farm. He has an attractive 
residence in Crawfordsville. He has been \'ery successful from a financial 
standpoint. He is business manager of the Craivfordsville Review. 

Politically, he is a Democrat and has long been active and influential in 
the ranks. He was county chairman for three times, and he piloted the party 
into power the last two campaigns. 

Fraternally, Mr. Merrell is also well known. He is a thirty-second de- 
gree Mason, having attained the Knight Templar degrees, also belongs to the 



8o6 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, also is a member of all 
branches of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and holds membership 
with the Tribe of Ben-Hur, the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of 
Red Men, and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

The domestic life of Mr. Merrell began on July 13, 1873, when he was 
united in marriage to a lady of refinement and a representative of a highly 
esteemed family, Nannie Bonnell, daughter of Alfred and Catherine (Ed- 
wards) Bonnell. 

The union of our subject and wife has been blessed by the birth of six 
children, namely: Alfred D., of Crawfordsville; Etta, wife of C. B. Munns, 
of Waynetown ; William, a farmer of Wayne township ; Stella is the wife of 
E. Bold, of Waynetown; Clarence F., an attorney at Fargo, North Dakota; 
Ruth, is attending college at Oberlin, Ohio. 



DANIEL REMLEY. 



In many respects the career of Daniel Remley, long one of the most pro- 
gressive agriculturists and stock raisers of Montgomery county, who is now 
living, practically retired from the active duties of life, in the city of Craw- 
fordsville, is peculiarly instructive in that it shows what a^well defined pur- 
pose, supplemented by correct principles and high ideals, can accomplish when 
one has ambition to succeed along legitimate and well defined lines. The 
splendid success which has come to Mr. Remley is directly traceable to the 
salient points in his character. With a mind capable of planning, he combined 
a will strong enough to execute his well-formulated purposes, and his great 
energ)', sound judgment, keen discrimination and perseverance have resulted 
in the accumulation of a handsome property. He is a scion of one of the old 
and influential pioneer families of Montgomery county, the excellent reputa- 
tion of which he has kept unsullied. 

Daniel Remley was born on the old homestead west of Crawfordsville, on 
July 8, 1841. He is a son of John and Sarah (McCain) Remley, a complete 
sketch of whom is found on other pages of this volume. 

Our subject grew to manhood in Union township, assisting with the gen- 
eral work on the large home farm, and he received his early education in the 
district schools. He continued to work at home until he was thirty-two years 
of age, when he removed to a farm given him by his father, a valuable piece 
of land in Walnut township. It was a very attractive, productive and desir- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 807 

able farm, comprising two hundred acres of well-tiled land, highly cultivated 
and provided with a modern and well-appointed set of buildings. Here he 
continued to carry on general farming and stock raising until a few years ago 
when he removed to Crawfordsville for the purpose of educating his children. 
He had been very successful in a financial way, haxing managed well, 
especiall)- as a stock man, haxing kept standard grades of Ii\-estock of all kinds 
on his place. 

Mr. Remley was married on January 25, 1872 to Angie Stout, who was 
born March 29, 1854, in Union township, this county, and here she grew to 
womanhood and was educated in the local schools. She is a daughter of Joel 
and Lucinda (Switzer) Stout. Joel Stout, was a farmer who owned a good 
farm west of Crawfordsville. He was lx)rn in Fayette county, Indiana, and 
was a son of William Stout, who came to tliis state from Butler county, Ohio. 
He married Esther Turner, and to this union nine children were born. \\'il- 
son Stout was one of the early settlers of the county, and located on an ex- 
cellent farm west of Crawfordsville. Joel Stout came to Montgomery county 
when a young man and here he and Lucinda Switzer were married. She was 
a daughter of Peter Switzer, and a relative of General U. S. Grant. The 
father of Peter Switzer was a native of Virginia, whose father had come to 
this country from Switzerland. Peter Switzer's mother was a daughter of 
Peter Grant. His parents were reared and married in Kentucky, and in 1829, 
removed to Indiana, settling on a farm west of Cra\vfords\'ille. Peter Switzer 
lived to up towards the century mark. The Switzers were all Methodists in 
religion, and Republicans in politics. Ten children were born to Peter Grant 
Switzer and wife. The death of Mrs. Lucinda Stout occurred on January 
25, 1888. 

To Daniel Remley and wife three children were born, namely : James 
Albert, is a successful farmer in Union township, this county; Ollie, who is 
deceased, was an artist of rare ability, painting in oils or using crayons with 
equal skill; Ethel, who is also talented as an artist, is living at home. 

Daniel Remley has long been numljered among the liest citizens of his 
native county, and his home is associated with much that has forwarded its 
interests, both materially and in a higher sense. He is active in religious 
matters, being an elder in the Union Presbyterian church of Walnut town- 
ship for many years. His father was one of the founders of that church. 
His wife and children are also members of this church, and all have been 
identified with Sunday school work. Politically, Mr. Remley is a Republican. 
He is a member of the National Horse Thief Detective Association. 



oO« MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

WILLIAM S. COON. 

Among the well-to-do and reputable agriculturists of Montgomery county 
none occupy a more honorable position in the regard of his colleagues than 
the gentleman whose name heads this article. He is a student of everything 
that pertains to his vocation and has always adopted the best of improved 
methods of cultivating the soil and in raising live stock. He is well regarded 
in his community not only because of his industry but also because of his 
readiness to lend whatever aid that is demanded of him in furthering move- 
ments calculated to further the material, civic and moral affairs of Coal Creek 
township, and Montgomery county. 

William S. Coon was born on February 20, 1856 in Fountain county, 
Indiana. He is a son of Isaac and Ruth (Stephens) Coon. The father was 
born in Ohio in 1823, and the mother was born in Indiana in 1826. Here she 
grew to womanhood, received a common school education and spent her life, 
dying on September 29, 1859. The father of our subject spent his earlier 
years in his native state, and there received a public school education, but re- 
moved from Ohio to Indiana when a boy and here he spent the residue of his 
years, devoting his life to general farming, becoming well established in Foun- 
tain county. He reached the advanced age of eighty years, being called to his 
reward on January 5, 1893. 

Isaac Coon became the father of sixteen children, nine of whom are still 
living. He was twice married, and there was an equal number of children 
born of each marriage — eight. 

William S. Coon grew to manhood on the home farm and there in Foun- 
tain county he received a good common school education. On September 4, 
1878 he was united in marriage to Mary C. Koon, (no relation). Mrs. Coon 
was born on September 4, 1859, in Coal Creek township, Montgomery county, 
and hence she grew to womanhood and received a common school education. 
She is a daughter of John and Mary (Temple) Koon, the father a native of 
Kentucky, and the mother of Ohio. They received the usual educational 
advantages of their time and spent their mature years in Indiana, becoming 
well established in Coal Creek township, Montgomery county. Two children 
were born to them, Mary C, wife of our subject; and a son, deceased. 

Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. William S. Coon, namely : 
Calvin, born July 2. 1879, is married and lives at Wingate; Christopher, born 
July II, 1880, is married and lives on the county line; Clarence, born August 
31, 1881, is married and also lives on the county line; Clifford, born June 4, 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 809 

1883, is married and lives in Coal Creek township, this county; Clyde, born 
May 27, 1892, lives at home, assisting his father with the general work on the 
farm; Cora, born October 24, 1901, is attending the home schools. 

William S. Coon has always devoted himself to agricultural pursuits, with 
ever increasing success, until he is today owner of one of the choice and finely 
improved faniis of Coal Creek township, consisting of two hundred and 
eighty-four acres. It is all tillable and is under a high state of cultivation, 
and is well tilled. On.r subject has always handled a good grade of live stock. 
He built the residence which he and his family still occupy when he first took 
possession of the place. 

Politically, he is a loyal Democrat, and was for two years a member of 
the advisory board. 



JOHN R. CRANE. 



The name of John R. Crane is well known over the northwestern part 
of Montgomery county wliere he has long been engaged extensively as a 
buyer and shipper of live stock, and he has also followed general farming 
successfully in the vicinity of the town of Wingate. He is a man whom the 
farmers have learned to rely upon, consequently he is one of the most suc- 
cessful stock buyers that this locality has ever known. 

Mr. Crane was born on September 28, 1857 in Fountain county, Indiana. 
He is a son of Joel and Mary (Taylor) Crane. Tlie birth of the father 
occurred in 1817 in Warren county, Ohio, from which state he came to 
Indiana when a boy and here he became a prosperous farmer and a well 
known citizen of Fountain county, dying in the year 1902. The mother of 
our subject was born in Kentucky, and she too reached an advanced age. dying 
in 1900. The\' were a hard-working, hospitable, honest couple who were 
well liked by all their neighbors. They recei\'ed meagre education in the 
common schools of their day, and they spent their lives engaged in general 
farming. Their family consisted of seven children, all sons, namely : Oliver 
H., Louis C, Cyrus, John R. (our subject), A. F., J. W., and Ira A. They 
were all reared on the farm and assisted tlieir father with the work on the 
same during their boyhood days, and they had the advantages of good com- 
mon schools. 

John R. Crane began life for himself as a general farmer which had 
remained one of his chief vocations, however, he now turns his attention very 
largelv to handling of live stock, which he raises, buys, and ships, and is 



8lO MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

doing an extensive business. He is the owner of eighty acres of land in 
Fountain county, which is well improved and productive. He resides in a 
pleasant, large home in Wingate, and he has a fine ten acre feed lot in the 
same town. He has been very successful in his life work, and is one of the 
substantial men of Coal Creek township. 

Politically, Mr. Crane is a Republican, but he has never sought public 
office. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic Order and the Knights of 
Pythias, both at Wingate. 

Mr. Crane has been twice married, uniting with his second wife on 
November 27, 1902. This union was to Mrs. Carrie O. (Webb) Butler, 
she having been previously married to a Mr. Butler. She is a daughter of 
Horace and Sarah Ann (Phillip) Webb, a highly respected family. Mrs. 
Crane received a good common school education. 

Mr. Crane's second union has been without issue, but there were three 
children by his first wife, living, namely: Abel C, Lulla and J. Forrest. 
These children are all living at home and have received excellent educational 
advantages of which they are making the most. The family is well known 
in this neighborhood and, being neighborly and of good personal character- 
istics thev are liked by all who know them. 



BEN S. MYERS. 



The Old Dominion, "the mother of Presidents," has perhaps sent from 
her vast domain of rich valley and rugged mountain more people "worth 
while," who have gone into other states of the Union and there proved their 
mettle by what they have done in the way of upbuilding new localities, than 
any other, the great Empire state not excepted. The Virginians are also uni- 
versally noted for their hospitality and genial address. One of these worthy 
sons, one of the few who has selected Montgomery county, Indiana, is Ben 
S. Myers, for many years one of the most extensive and active contractors 
of Crawfordsville, known throughout the United States and Canada, also 
as an expert poultry judge. He maintains here a large establishment, mak- 
ing shipments of his superior grade of fowls and fancy eggs, and no man in 
Indiana is regarded as a better authority in this line, or indeed, in any other 
state as to that matter. Poultry raising has been given a great impetus by 
him, and he has done much to better the grades. Not so very long ago when 
those who de\-oted their attention exclusively to raising poultry were com- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 8ll 

paratively few, this line of endeavor was sort of a side line with farmers; 
but during the past decade conditions have changed and e\erywhere we find 
men prospering bj^ giving their exclusive attention to the raising of poultry, 
all kinds and colors being raised, each fancying his breed is the best. But 
notwithstanding this increase, the demand is still far in excess of the supply, 
which fact renders it certain that the poultry business will continue to be one 
of the important industries of the country. 

Mr. Myers was born in the state of Virginia on June 20, 1852, and he 
is a son of James W. and Anna E. Myers, who spent their earlier \ears in 
that state, remaining there until 1854, when they removed to Danville, Illi- 
nois, the subject being then two years old, and there they established the 
family home, the parents spending the rest of their lives there. 

Ben S. Myers grew to manhood at Danville and received a limited edu- 
cation in the common schools, having been thrown out into the world on his 
own resources when a boy as a result of domestic troubles. He apprenticed 
himself to a brick mason, and after learning same followed that for several 
years and was regarded as an expert. On August 10, 1872, he came to 
Craw fords ville, Indiana, and worked in the building of the old high school. 
The following spring he went into the contracting business with A. S. New- 
ton and built several buildings in Irvington and Spiceland, Illinois, then re- 
turned to Crawfordsville and' worked on the court house, and continued con- 
tracting under the firm name of Myers & Swan, and tlie\- did a large and 
successful business in this part of the state, many of the most important 
buildings in this and nearby cities standing as monuments to their skill as 
builders, such as the old Y. M. C. A. building, Carnegie library. Masonic 
temple. Center Presbyterian, Baptist and Christian and United Brethren 
churches, the Crawfords\-ille Trust Building, the coffin factory, the nail fac- 
tory, Poston brick plant and Big Four station. In 1904 this partnership, 
which had been so successful for several years, was dissolved, after which 
Mr. Myers engaged in the business alone, continuing with ever increasing suc- 
cess. During this period he built the following school houses in Crawfords- 
ville : Breaks. Garfield and Smartsburg: the Darlington Addition, and addi- 
tion to the wire works, the J. J. Darter and Poston residences. 

In 1877 Mr. Myers turned his attention to poultry and began raising 
the famous "Black Langshans," and he is possibly the oldest breeder of that 
stock in the United States. From that time until the present, a period of 
over thirty-five years, he has had ever increasing success, until they have 
been the means of carrying his name broadcast throughout the land and into 
foreign countries. His first exhibit was in Indianapolis in 1887, '" the 



8l2 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Meridian Rink Building. Since tliat time he has had prize winners in 
Kansas City, Denver, New Orleans, Nashville, Columbus, Chicago, Indian- 
apolis, New York, Cleveland, Cincinnati and St. Louis. For twenty-two 
years he has been one of the credited judges of the American Poultry Asso- 
ciation, and was one of the first to have a judge's license in this large asso- 
ciation. He has gone all over the United States and Canada as a judge of 
poultry shows, and his decisions have ever been characterized by fairness 
and sound judgment and satisfactory to all concerned. At this writing he 
has about one hundred pure-bred "Black Langshans," and inquiries about 
them are coming in constantly from all over the country. He is well equipped 
for the proper care of his poultry and eggs, everything about his poultry 
yards being of the most approved kind. He owns one of the commodious 
and attractive residences in Crawfordsville, beautiful from an architectural 
standpoint. This pleasant dwelling is presided over with commendable 
grace by a lady of refinement, known in her maidenhood as Frances Brande- 
camp, representative of a highly respected and well known familv of this 
city, where she grew to womanhood and was educated. She is of German 
parentage. 

The union of Mr. Myers and wife has been blessed by the birth of five 
children, namely: Paul J., Charles J., L. J., Benjamin Herbert and Bessie 
Helena, the two latter being twins. 

Mr. Myers is prominent in fraternal circles, holding membership with 
the local lodges of Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of America. 
The Elks home in Crawfordsville was built by Myers & Son. Politically, the 
subject is a Republican. He is a good mixer and, being an obliging, jovial 
gentleman, is popular with all with whom he comes in contact. 



F. F. CUMA^INGS. 



There could be no more comprehensive history written of a community 
or county or even of a state and its people than that which deals with the life 
work of those who, by their own endeavor and indomitable energy, have 
placed themselves where they well deserve the title of "prominent and pro- 
gressive," and in this sketch will be found the record of one who has out- 
stripped the less active and less able plodders on the highway of life, one who 
has been consistent in his life work and never permitted the "grass to grow 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 813 

under his feet," one who, while advancing his own interests has not neglected 
his full duties to the general public, at the same time upholding an honored 
family name. Such a man is F. F. Cummings, of the Cummings y\uto Com- 
pany, a well known and rapidly growing concern at Crawfordsville. 

Mr. Cummings was born in Chainpaign county, Illinois, May 23, 1883. 
He is a son of Marshall F. and Minerva (Porter) Cummings. The father 
was a prosperous planing mill man and contractor of Indianapolis, spending 
the latter part of his life in the Hoosier capital and dying there on March 7, 
1910. His widow survives and still makes her home in Indianapolis. 

F. F. Cummings was a child when his parents removed from Champaign 
county, Illinois, in 1887, and he grew to manhood in the metropolis and there 
received his education, which included a course in a business college, after 
which he went to work in his father's planing mill where he remained until 
he was nineteen years old, during which time he mastered the various details 
of that line of work. He then took up railroading, securing a position as 
brakeman on the Pennsylvania road, but after a year of that dangerous and 
arduous work he returned to the planing mill where he remained until four 
years ago when he and his brother, H. S. Cummings bought out the Alfrey 
Auto Company at Crawfordsville, and they have built up a large and rapidly 
growing business. They handle the Ford and Hudson cars and conduct a 
general repair house, also storage for autos, handling supplies of all kinds, 
gasoline, oil, etc. Their patrons come from all over this locality, anfl an 
evidence of their success as salesmen is seen from the fact that most of the 
cars in Montgomery and adjoining counties seem to be the makes which they 
handle. They under.stand every phase of their business and are prepared to 
do promptly high grade work. 

H. S. Cummings was born on August 13, 1885, and was educated in 
Indianapolis. Like his brother he learned the planing mill business under 
his father and followed the same until he came to Crawfordsville a few years 
ago. He is a member of the Masonic Order, and he and his brother are both 
standpatters in politics, voting the Republican ticket. These young men have 
made a iine start in the business world and the future promises much for 
them. 

F. F. Cummings was married on February 20, 1905, to Lillian E. Robin- 
son, daughter of C. M. Robinson, a plumber of Indianapolis. To this union 
two children have been born, namely: Marshall F., and Marion N. 

On October 2, 1910, H. S. Cimimings married Delia Bruner, the daugh- 
ter of Joseph Bruner, of Hillsboro, Indiana, a carpenter by trade. Mr. 
Cummings belongs to the Masonic lodge, and politically is a Republican. 



8l4 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

W. E. McWILLIAMS. 

There are several business houses in the city of Crawfordsville that are 
not only thorughly typical of the comprehensive growth and increasing im- 
portance of the place, but also distinctly a source of public pride, delineating 
as they do the general business enterprise and commercial sagacity of some 
of our leading citizens. Such an establishment is the McWilliams Furniture 
Company, of which W. E. McWilliams, one of the most thorough going, 
enterprising business men of Montgomery county is the head. He is widely 
known throughout this locality, having spent the major portion of his life in 
this section of the Wabash Valley country, although a native of the land of 
the "big muddy water," but he was brought to an adjoining county when a 
child and his manhood years have been passed in this part of Hoosierdom. 
He has displayed excellent judgment and more than ordinary business acu- 
men. He gives almost his entire attention and thought to his business enter- 
prise, is careful and exact in his transactions and has the pleasantest relations 
with his patrons and the general public. 

W. E. McWilliams was born in Clinton county, Missouri, August 8, 
1868. He is a son of Dudley and Dora (Elder) McWilliams, who removed 
to Parke county, Indiana, when our subject was twelve years old, in the year 
1870, and there the family continued to reside until 1908 when the father re- 
moved to Center Point, Texas, where he still resides. He has devoted his 
life successfully to agricultural pursuits and is known as a man of industry 
and honesty wherever he has lived. Politically, he is a Democrat, and in 
fraternal affairs belongs to the Masonic Order. 

W. E. McWilliams grew to manhood on the home farm in Parke county 
and there assisted with the general work during the crop seasons and in the 
winter time he attended the common schools. He began life for himself by 
farming and raising stock, handling mules, horses and other stock of a good 
grade, and was successful from the start, carrying on general farming in con- 
nection with handling live stock. His place was located near Marshall, and 
there he continued operations until 1908 when he came to Crawfordsville and 
bought out G. W. Newlin's furniture store, and he has since been engaged in 
this line of business with ever increasing success. He carries one of the 
finest lines of complete furnishings, carpets, rugs, stoves, etc., to be found in 
western Indiana, showing at all seasons an up-to-date and carefully selected 
stock, and he draws his hundreds of patrons from all over the county, for 
here they know they will receive uniform, counteous and honest treatment. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 815 

His place of business is located on Washington street, and is known as the 
McWilliams Furniture Company. He carries a stock that would invoice 
between ten thousand and fifteen thousand dollars at all times, and he has 
been very successful in a financial way. 

Mr. McWilliams is a public-spirited man and always aids any movement 
which has for its object the betterment of his city or county. Fraternally, 
he belongs to the Tribe of Ben-Hur, the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and until recentlv was a member of the Knights of Pvthias. 



GEORGE P. RAMSEY, M. D. 

One of the most promising and best known of the younger physicians 
and surgeons of Montgomery county and vicinity is Dr. George P. Ramsey, 
who, while yet young in years has shown himself to be the possessor of all 
the varied attributes necessary in the makeup of the successful minister to 
human ills, having a decided natural talent in this science and also an engag- 
ing personality, being a man who commands the respect and confidence of 
his patients and consequently gets speedy results. He has made a host of 
friends since establishing himself in his profession here, and is one of our 
worthiest home boys and in even,- respect a most creditable representative of 
the medical profession in a community long noted for the high order of its 
talent. 

Dr. Ramsey was born in Crawfordsville, Indiana, February, i8, 1876, 
and he is a son of William T. and Tabitha J. ( Hightower) Ramsey, the 
former born in Lexington, Kentucky, finalh- coming to Montgomery county, 
Indiana, where he established the permanent home of the family. Here he 
and Tabitha J. Hightower were married, she ha\'ing come with her parents 
to Montgomery county when young. 

Dr. Ramsey grew to manhood in his native city and here he attended 
the common schools, and was graduated from the local high school with the 
class of 1896. Early in life he determined upon a career as a physician and 
with this end in view he entered Central College of Physicians and Surgeons 
at Indianapolis (now known as the Indiana Medical College). Here he 
made an excellent record and was graduated with the class of 1900. While 
in that institution he became a member of the Galenien society, a student 
literary body and was quite influential in the same. 

After leaving college, Dr. Ramsey located at Newton, Fountain county. 



8l6 MONTGOMERY COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

where he remained six years, building up a satisfactory practice. He then 
removed to Whitesville, where he remained three years with Hke success. 
Seeking a larger field for the exercise of his talents he came to Crawfords- 
ville in 1909, and opened an office which he has since maintained, ever enjoy- 
ing a large, growing and lucrative patronage. He has kept well up-to-date 
in his profession by close study as well as practical experience. 

Fraternally, the Doctor is a member of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, the Knights of the Maccabees, Fraternal Order of Eagles, and Owls, in 
all of which he is deservedly popular, being nest physician of the last named 
order. Politically, he is a Republican. For two years he very ably and 
acceptably discharged the duties of county coroner. Religiously, he is a 
Baptist. 

Dr. Ramsey was married on May 15. 1907, to Fannie Smith, of near 
Whitesville, where her family is well and favorably known. 



LOUIS BISCHOF. 



An enumeration of the enterprising men of the Wabash Valley country 
and especially of Montgomery county who have won recognition and suc- 
cess for themselves and at the same time have conferred honor upon the 
locality where they reside would be incomplete were there failure to make 
mention of Louis Bischof , who, while yet young in years, became one of the 
substantial and most representative business men and influential citizens of 
the city of Crawfordsville, which position he has continued to maintain, con- 
ducting an extensive mercantile establishment. He has ever held worthy 
prestige in mercantile circles and was always regarded as distinctively a man 
of affairs and has wielded a potent influence among those with whom his lot 
has been cast, having won definite success and shown what a man of lofty 
principles, honesty of purpose and determination can win by proper efifort. 
He stands in the front rank of the men who honor his calling and because of 
his industry, integrity and courtesy he enjoys the good will and respect of all 
classes. 

Louis Bischof was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, February 19, i860. 
He is a son of Jacob and Minnie Bischof, both natives of Germany, where 
they grew to maturity, were educated and married and there spent their 
earlier years, emigrating from the famous city of Heidelberg to the United 
States in 1856, and locating at Terre Haute, Indiana, where they became well 




c/o-uu^ UJU^^^^A^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. Si/ 

established and to tliem were born the following children: Louis, subject 
of this review; :\Irs. Fannie Kalin, of Crawfordsville; Morris Bischof, who 
lives in Chicago; Mrs. Dora Bernheimer, of Terre Haute: John Bischof, who 
lives in Crawfordsville: Mrs. Carrie Levi, wlio resided in Cincinnati, and 
Abe Bischof, both deceased. 

Louis Bischof was only eleven months old when his father died. His 
mother survived many years, reaching an advanced age, and died some 
twelve years ago. 

Louis Bischof grew to manhood in the city of Terre Haute and there 
he received his education in the public schools. When seventeen years of age 
he came to Crawfordsville and began his business career in 1877, and has 
always been a merchant, ha\ing had a decided natural bent for that line of 
endeavor, and his rise has been gradual and certain, each year finding him 
further advanced than the preceding. His first store was a one-story room 
in Washington street. By his courtesy, thrift and splendid business judg- 
ment, his store soon outgrew his limited quarters there, so larger accommo- 
dations were secured by the purchase of a story and a half building on Main 
street. Within a short time this, too. proved inadequate to the fast-growing 
business, when an adjoining room of equal proportions was added. With 
the growth of Crawfordsville and the constant increase of activity in its com- 
mercial life this building soon proved too small to meet the demands of the 
business. Mr. Bischof then built iiis present substantial and commodious 
structure, with a forty-three foot front and one hundred and sixty-five feet 
in depth, with basement and four floors. The building is modern in all its 
appointments, with electric passenger and freight elevators, its own electric 
lighting plant, pneumatic cash system and every feature of up-to-date store 
service. 

When Mr. Bischof began business he enipl(i}ed only five people. One 
hundred employes are now on the pay roll of the Louis Bischof Big Store. 
A very large and carefully selected stock of general merchandise is carried, a 
new stock purchased each season, and the thousands of satisfied and regular 
customers of this mammoth enterprise know tliat here they always receive 
honest and courteous treatment, which is uniform to all classes. One reason 
Mr. Bischof is enabled to sell his goods at a much lower figure than other 
merchants is because he buys his goods in enormous quantities, hence pur- 
chases them lower than if bought in small lots here and there. Thus he gives 
his customers the benefit of this reduction. His fine store is neatly arranged, 
tastily kept and is a comfortable place both winter and summer, everything 

(.S2) 



8l8 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

being provided for the comfort of customers, and it is the favorite gathering 
place for farmers' families from all over Montgomery and adjoining coun- 
ties when in Crawfordsville. Everything is managed under a superb system. 

In 1907 Mr. Bischof incorporated the business under the name of the 
Louis Bischof Big Store, a unique feature of the incorporation being that it 
is organized on the co-operative plan. At the present time there are over 
three thousand stockholders of this great store living in Crawfordsville and 
Montgomery county, who, impelled by a common interest, take a personal 
pride in the success of the enterprise, and are making it one of the best and 
largest stores in the state. 

In addition to being the president of the corporation mentioned above, 
Mr. Bischof has always given liberally of his time and money to the better- 
ment and advancement of the city of Crawfordsville, whose interests he has 
ever had at heart, having great faith in its future and favorable location as a 
commercial center. 

Mr. Bischof is a member of DeBayard Lodge, Knights of Pythias; the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Crawfordsville Lodge No. 483. 
He is also a member of the B'nai Brith. 

Mr. Bischof is a member of the Crawfordsville Commercial Club and a 
director in the same. He is a stockholder in the Farmers and Merchants 
Trust Company. He is also president of the Louis Bischof Big Store of 
Ladoga, Indiana, where a large business is carried on with the surrounding 
country, this being one of the largest and most complete department stores in 
the Wabash country, and, like its sister establishment in the county-seat, 
would be a credit to a town much larger than Ladoga. 



MARION E. CLODFELTER. 

No more popular or able exponent of the legal profession is to be found 
in Montgomery and surrounding counties than Marion E. Clodfelter, of 
Crawfordsville, a man who seems to combine, by both nature and training, 
all the elements essential in the makeup of a first-class lawyer. He is a man 
of broad mind, alert, energetic, and always has the interests of his clients at 
heart, sparing no pains in their behalf, and, being a man of exemplary char- 
acter he has the confidence and good will of the people of this locality. He 
is the scion of a worthy old pioneer family and the name Clodfelter has been 
a well known one in the annals of the Wabash country for many decades. 



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Mt)Nr(;()Mi:RV coixrv, Indiana. R19 

consequently is eminently deservint;- of ])roininenl mention in am- history of 
this part of the Hoosier state. 

Mr. Clodfelter was horn in I'utnam 
he is a son of Alathias and Mar\' M. (; 
born in Xorth Carolina in iSid, and the 
in 1819. They lioth were hroui;ht to 1' 
children, by their parents. The father, 
and miller and well known here in the 
Mathias Clodfelter and Mary M. Sayler grew to maturity and were married 
in 1838, mo\-ing from Putnam to Montgomeiy county in December, 181 4, 
and locating on forty acres of land in Ripley township. This ground was 
cleared by Mr. Clodfelter and, being a hard w'orkerand a good manager he 
prospered and added to his original holdings until he owned an excellent 
farm of one hundred and forty acres, and this he continued to farm suc- 
cessfully until his health failed, when he removed to .\lamo and o])enc(l a 
grocery store which he conducted for si.x or eight years, building u|) a large 
trade with the surrounding country. He tlien retired from the acli\e duties 
of life and moved to New Ross where his death occurred. He was one of 
the first tow-nship trustees of Ripley township, and was for some time justice 
of the peace. Politically, he was a Democrat, and in religion a Universalist. 
The death of his wife occurred in Crawfordsxille. She was a woman of 
rare attributes, being a natural botanist and she knew medical varieties of 
plants and herbs, and she doctored her own family \-ery successfully. 
Thirteen children were born to Mathias Clodfelter and wife, four of whom 
are living at this writing, namely: Evelyne is the wife of Rev. T. E. Ballard; 
Ellie is the wife of E. E. Ballard: Minnie married J. R. Etter: and Marion 
E., of this review. 

Marion E. Clodfelter grew to manhood in this native count\- and here 
received a common school education, later entering Waveland Academy, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1872, with the degree of B. C. 
He began life for himself as a teacher, in which field of enedavor his rise 
was rapid and he had the honor of serving Montgomery county as its first 
superintendent of schools, and he deser\es much credit for the successful 
manner in which he disi^osed of the huge task of organizing the schools of 
the county. He has always been in sympathy with the local educational work 
and has done much in furthering the same. Finally tiring of the school 
room and deciding that his true bent was toward legal circles he took up the 
study of law with Koons & E\'ans, of Crawfordsville, studying part of the 



820 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

five years that he was engaged in teaching. He began the practice of his 
profession at the town of New Ross in 1878, remaining there two years and, 
then, seeking a larger field for the exercise of his talents, he removed to 
Crawfordsville in 1880, and he has been continuously and successfully en- 
gaged in the practice here ever since, or for a period of thirty-two years, 
during which time he has figured prominently in the important cases in the 
local courts and has attained a position in the front rank of attorneys of 
western Indiana. He is ever a profound studeent, and has kept fully abreast 
of the times in all that pertains to his vocation. He is a careful, painstaking 
and energetic advocate, and as a speaker has great weight with a jury, being 
a logical, forceful and not infrequently truly eloquent speaker. He is always 
busy and has built up a large and lucrative practice. 

Politically, Mr. Clodfelter is a Progressive, and is much enthused in 
the work of the new party. He belongs to the Masonic Order and to the 
Patriotic Order of the Sons of America. 

Mr. Clodfelter was married in 1873 to Lucinda C. Myers, a lady of re- 
finement and education, and a daughter of William Myers, a worthy early 
settler of Fountain county. To this union two children have been born, 
namely: Stella I., who is the present court reporter of the local courts; and 
Cora Donna, wife of Ward Williams. Mrs. Clodfelter was born in Fountain 
county on October 4, 1854. 

Mr. Clodfelter enjoys the distinction of being the first person to hold a 
life certificate to teach school in Montgomery county. 



LUTHER R. LONG. 



It is, or at least should be, the pride of every American that there are no 
bounds set on the limits to which legitimate ambition, perseverance and right 
ideals may not aspire. Although one may be born and reared under the most 
discouraging environment, he is, notwithstanding, able to break such bonds 
and rise to any and every station of honor and usefulness in the land. The 
attributes do not necessarily have to be of a transcendent nature to enable 
him to accomplish this result. It is more the way the individual does it and 
his skill in seizing opportunities presented than to any extraordinaiy qualities 
innate in him. Accordingly it is very often found in the United States that 
the men in exalted positions in both the civic and business world possess no 
higher ability than thousands of other citizens. They have simply taken bet- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 82 1 

ter advantage of their circumstances than their fellows. And this trutli runs 
through every occupation. The tiller of the soil who makes a greater success 
than his neighbors does so because he has found the secret of rising above 
the surroundings which hold others down. 

One of this type of men in Montgomery county is Luther R. Long, the 
present county commissioner, and for many years one of our leading farmers 
and stock men. now living in retirement in his pleasant home north of Craw- 
fordsville. 

Mr. Long was born on .\ugust 7. 1847 in Brown county, Ohio, where he 
spent his earlier life and received his education, and from there he came to 
Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1874 where he has since resided. He is a son 
of William and Anna (Davis) Long. The father was liorn on September 6, 
1810 in Brown county, Ohio, and tliere the mother was also born on March 
6, 1812. There they grew to maturity, were educated and married, and spent 
their lives engaged in general farming, and to them four children were born. 
They are now deceased, the father's death having occurred on .'\ugust 14, 
1889, ^""^1 the mother passed away at a very ailvanced age in September, 1906. 

Luther R. Long was married on October 28, 1874, to Caroline Purdum, 
who was born August 19, 1854, in Brown county, Ohio, and there she grew to 
womanhood and received, a common school education. She was a daughter of 
Aaron and Margaret Ellen (Colgin) Purdum. the mother having been born 
in Delaware, and the father in Ohio. 

Four children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Lawrence 
R., born September 17, 1875, married Helen \\'el)ster. and they Ii\e in Fort 
Worth, Texas; Pearl, born January 17, 1878, married in igii to Frank D. 
Noland, and they live in Montgomery county: Ann, born April 29. 1881. mar- 
ried Mahlon D. Manson, and they live in Terre Haute, Indiana: and Luther 
L., born July 17, 1885, married Zula Russell, and they live in Crawfordsville. 

Mr. Long has always engaged in general farming and stock raising and 
has met with pronounced success all along the line. He owns a finely im- 
proved and productive farm of one hundred and seven acres, all tillable and 
well tiled. In connection with general farming he has raised fine live stock, 
handling a superior grade of trotting horses, which have been greatly admired 
by all who have seen them. He has a commudious and well furnished home 
and substantial outbuildings. 

Politically, Mr. Long is a Democrat, and he has l^een county commissioner 
of Montgomery county since 1906, filling the office in a manner that has re- 
flected much credit upon himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. He 
belongs to the Horse Thief Detective Association. 



822 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOHN FRANKLIN WARBRITTON. 

If there is one thing which distinguishes the American business man 
over those of any> other country it is the faculty with which any and all oc- 
cupations are readily taken up by him and made successful. In the older 
countries it was customary for the son to follow the father's pursuit. "Fol- 
low your father, my son, and do as your father has done," was a maxim 
which all sons were expected to adopt. It was jn such countries as the United 
States that full swing can be given to the energies of the individual. A man 
may choose any business or profession he desires, and he is limited only by 
competition. He must meet the skill of others and give as good service as 
they, or he will not get the positions, the prestige, or business. Such adapta- 
tion to any work or business is well shown in the career of John Franklin 
Warbritton, well known real estate dealer of Crawfordsville, and formerly a 
popular recorder of Montgomery county. 

Mr. Warbritton was born in Rockville. Parke county, Indiana, on 
March 6, 1865. He is a son of Samuel N. and Amelia A. (Seaman) War- 
britton. The father was born in Scott township, Montgomery county, In- 
diana, December 5, 183 1. He was a son of Peter and Phoebe Warbritton, 
early settlers of this county, and well known to the pioneers of this vicinity. 

Samuel N. Warbritton devoted all his active life to agricultural pur- 
suits, with the exception of two years, which were spent at Rockville, where 
he was engaged in buying horses for the Union army, during the latter part 
of the Civil war. He and his wife are still living near the place where he 
was born, living now in retirement, after years of successful endeavor. 

John F. Warbritton was educated in the country schools, and was 
graduated from the Ladoga Normal in 1885, then began life for himself by 
farming, which he followed two years, then clerked at New Market for a 
period of twelve years, gi^■ing satisfaction to his employers. He then came 
to Crawfordsville and engaged in the clothing luisiness, and was getting a 
good start in this line when the Republicans elected him county recorder, 
which office he held for a period of eight years, in a manner which reflected 
much credit upon his ability and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned, 
irrespective of party alignment, giving his best efforts to the work and 
proving to be one of the most faithful and praiseworthy officials the county 
has ever had. After his term of office had expired he engaged in the real 
estate business, which he still continues on an extensive scale, having built 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INDIANA. 823 

up a large and growing business. No man in the county is letter |K)ste(l on 
tlie value of lx)th city and rural property tlian lie. 

Fraternally, Mr. Warhritton is a memlier of the Benevolent and I'ro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

In February. iS86. Mr. Warhritton was married to Laura A. Rush, 
daughter of V. J. and Jennie Rush. She was 1)orn in Xew Market. Mont- 
gomery county, Indiana, in iS^jS, and here she grew to womanhood and re- 
ceived her education. 

Two children have been liorn to Mr. and Mrs. Warliritton. nanielv : 
Ernest R.. who is in business with his father: and Blanche, who is at home. 



ELMER W. REAM. D. D. S. 

The dental profession of Montgomery county has an able and iwpular 
exponent in the person of Dr. Elmer W. Ream, of Crawfordsville. who has 
acquired a very high order of ability, believing in the most progressi\-e 
methods, and he has left nothing undone nor spared any expense in preparing 
himself for this important field of endeavor or to equip his office properly in 
order to insure the highest grade of work possible in the briefest time. Me 
is evidently of a decided mechanical turn of mind and more or less of the 
artistic temperament, so it is not to be wondered at that he has met w ith un- 
usual success in his chosen life work. Added to tliis natural l)ent is liis in- 
dustry and perseverance, being willing to put forth any eft'ort in order to learn 
a little more of this, one of the world's most imi)Mrtant and useful i)rofessions. 
Then, too, he is a gentleman of integrity and a uniform courtesy which have 
won for him a wide circle of warm friends since casting his lot with the jjcople 
of Montgomery county some years ago. 

Dr. Ream was born in Huntington couutw Indiana, on the old home 
fami, October 31, 1862, being the scion of an excellent and well established 
family in that section of the Hoosier state. His parents were David and 
Delilah Ream, who spent their lives successfully engaged in general agricul- 
tural pursuits in the abo\e named county and there they passed to their eternal 
rest many \ears ago. They w ere honest, hard-w nrking people who were liked 
in- all their neighbors. 

It was on the old homestead in Huntinglon county that Dr. Ream s])cnt 
his boyhood days and grew to manhood, and there he made himself generally 



824 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

useful during" the crop seasons when he became of proper age, and during 
the winter months he attended the district schools. After a good general edu- 
cation he, having long fostered the ambition to be a dentist, entered the Ohio 
College of Dental Surger}-, at Cincinnati, where he made an excellent record 
and from which institution he was graduated with the class of 1890. 

Thus well qualified for the vocation which he early decided to give his 
life forces to. Dr. Ream at once came to Crawfordsville, Indiana, and bought 
out the ofifice of Dr. G. S. Qements at 231I/2 East Main street, and here he has 
since been successfully engaged in the practice, building up a large and lucra- 
tive patronage. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, and in religious matters a Methodist. 

Dr. Ream was married in February, 1892, to Lulu Brewer, a daughter 
of Squire Brewer and wife, a highly respected Crawfordsville family, and to 
this union five children have been born, namely : Lulu Fern is teaching in the 
Wilson building in her home city: Vincent B., Mora Bell, Martha, are all 
attending high school, and Paul is in the graded school. 



CAPT. THOMAS THEODORE MUNHALL. 

It will always be a mark of distinction to have served the Lmion during 
the great war of the Rebellion. The old soldier will receive attention no 
matter where he goes if he will but make himself known. And when he 
passes away, as so many of them are now doing, most of them attaining their 
allotted "three score and ten years," mentioned by the divinely inspired 
Psalmist of old, friends will pay him suitable eulogy for the sacrifices he made 
a half century ago on the sanguinary fields of battle in the southland or in 
the no less dreaded prison, fever camp or hospital. And ever afterward his 
descendants will revere his memory and take pride in recounting his services 
for his country in its hour of peril. One of the most eligible citizens for spe- 
cific mention in a history of Montgomery county is Capt. Thomas Theodore 
Munhall, for many years a well known business man, and who is now living 
practically retired from the active duties of life in his pleasant home in Craw- 
fordsville. He is worthy of our attention partly because of the fact that he 
is one of the old soldiers who went forth in that great crisis in the sixties to 
assist in saving the union of states, and partly because he has been one of our 
honorable- and public-spirited citizens for a number of decades. He is a 




CAPT. THOS. T. MUNlfAL 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 825 

plain, straightforward, unassuming gentleman who has souglit to do his duty 
in all the relations of life as he has seen and understood the right. 

Captain Munhall was born on June 5, 1841. in Zanesville, Ohio. He is 
a son of Samuel and Sarah Hurd (Wiggins) Muniiall. The fatlier was born 
near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, July 30, 181 1, and in an early day went to 
Zanesville, Ohio, where he engaged in the mercantile business, and owing to 
the dishonesty of his partner, failed. He then took up farming which he 
continued a few years, then in 1858 went to Illinois and located near Farm- 
ington, where he continued general agricultural pursuits until his death, June 
27, 1893, at Forrest, Illinois. He was a Republican, and religiously, a 
Methodist. He was an industrious, hard working man and known for his 
uprightness and neighborliness. 

Sarah \\'iggins, who became the wife of Samuel Munhall. was born 
in Morris county. New Jersey, January 30, 1816, and her death occurred in 
Chicago. 

Capt. Thomas T. Munhall was educated at the Mclntire Academy at 
Zanesville, Ohio, and in the Putnam high school academy, at Putnam, Ohio, 
later attending the country schools in Illinois, after which he taught one 
term. 

^^'hen the Civil war came on he proved his patriotism and courage by 
being one of the first to enlist in defense of the Union, becoming a member 
of Company B, Eleventh Illinois Cavalry, under Col. "Bob" Ingersoll. who 
later became one of America's greatest orators. Our subject was made sec- 
ond sergeant in 1861, later first sergeant, in the fall of 1862. later second 
lieutenant, earning these promotions by gallant conduct on the field of battle. 
In 1864 he was promoted to the rank of captain and was transferred to Com- 
pany D of the same regiment. The memljers of Company B, presented him 
with a sword, sash, belt and gold plated spurs. Company D asked to a man 
to have him commissioned their captain. He accepted this promotion, and 
filled the same in a most faithful and gallant manner, taking part in the 
Meridian campaign under General Sherman. His company was later re- 
garded as one of the best drilled as well as best disciplined companies in the 
cavalry service, at the close of the war. 

Captain Munhall was in all of the engagements in which the Eleventh 
Cavalry participated, and was in Gen. Lew Wallace's division at the battles of 
Shiloh, Corinth, Farmington, Parker's Cross Roads, Jackson, Tennessee; 
Holly Springs, Union City, Bolivar, Black River, Qbeen's Hill and Jackson, 



8126 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mississippi ; Champion's Hills and many others of lesser note, in all of which 
he never shirked his dutj^ no matter how arduous or dangerous, according to 
his comrades. He took part in forty-two engagements in all, and, having a 
robust constitution and being a young man of good habits he was never 
sick or off duty during the entire war. On June 10, 1865 he was in charge 
of the last flag of truce ever taken into the Confederate lines. This was at 
Jackson, Tennessee. On October nth of that year he was honorably dis- 
charged, after a most commendable and envied record as a soldier for the 
defense and perpetuity of the nation. 

After his career in the army Captain Munhall returned to the farm in 
Illinois. In his earlier youth he had intended studying law, but the idea of 
a legal career was abandoned, and, after farming until 1876 he went to Indi- 
anapolis and took charge of A. C. May's heading and cooper shops, remain- 
ing there two years, then went to New Ross, where he was engaged in the 
shops also a store, then opened a store of his own. He was appointed post- 
master at New Ross, which position he held for a period of five years, with 
equal satisfaction to the people and the department; he was then nominated 
and elected county recorder and served two terms in a most creditable man- 
ner. He also served six years as trustee of Crawfordsville schools. He then 
engaged in the real estate, abstract and loan business with much success until 
1906, when he went to Custer county, Montana, and homesteaded one hun- 
dred and sixty acres and bought one hundred and sixty acres adjoining. He 
has placed it all under a high state of improvement and cultivation. He has 
been very successful in a business way and is now in his declining years well 
fixed in a financial way. 

Politically, he is a Republican, but he has never been especially active as 
a public man. He belongs to McPherson Post, Grand Army of the Republic. 
Fraternally, he is a Mason, belonging to the Chapter. He is also a member 
of the Knights of Pythias. 

Captain Munhall was married on February 7, 1871 to Mary E. Makin- 
son, of Illinois. She was born on March 2, 1845. ^nd died on December 
16, 1905. She was a daughter of Judge Makinson of Ottawa, Illinois, and 
she was a woman of many commendable traits of character and proved to be 
a worthy helpmeet in every respect. 

To the Captain and wife one child was born, a daughter, Gertrude Mun- 
hall, who is now assistant librarian at the Crawfordsville public library. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 827 

JAMES S. HITCHCOCK. 

The career of James S. Hitchcock, editor of The CrawfordsvUlc Re- 
view, has been strenuous, like that of all wlio select the newspaper field for 
their arena of action, and there is nothing in his record savorintj in the 
slightest degree of disrepute, his relations with his fellow men having lieen 
ever abo\e reproach and his good name beyond criticism. He wears the 
proud American title of self-made man, and being in the most lilieral sense 
of the term the architect of his own fortune he may well feel a sense of ])ride 
in his achievements and the honora1)le position U> which he lias attained 
among the enterprising young men of the county and city of iiis adoption. 

Mr. Hitchcock was born on July 24. 1885 in Jackson, Michigan. He 
is a son of Charles and Mary ( Smiley) Hitchcock. The father was born in 
1851, also in Jackson, Michigan, and his death occurred on March 17, 1908. 
The mother of our subject was born on May _', 1863 in Lansing, Michigan, 
and her death occurred on December 26. 1911. These parents grew to ma- 
turity, received common school educations and were married in their native 
state. Also the father was graduated from the Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege and from a musical college. He spent the major portion of his active 
life as a commercial traveler. Politically, he was a Republican. Fraternally, 
he beonged to the Masonic Order and the Kniglits of the Grip. He was also 
a member of the Presbyterian church. Louring the Spanish-American war 
he enlisted in Companv K, Tliirtx-third X'olunteer Infantry, under Captain 
Allen, and after a \-ery faithful ser\ice he was honorabl)- discharged, mustered 
out a lieutenant. 

To Charles Hitchcock and wife only one child was bom, James S. Hitcli- 
cock, of this review. 

Our subject received a common and high school education, later taking 
special work at the Michigan Agricultural College, and also attended Michi- 
gan I'niversity. 

He learned the printer's trade in the office of The Micliic/an Statesma)i, 
at Marshall, Michigan. In a short time he had mastered the ins and outs of 
the mechanical department of that ])a])er and two years after he began his 
apprenticeship there he was editor of the same, although a mere boy, and 
when onlv sixteen years old he was editor of The Index at Homer, Michigan, 
being one of the youngest, if not the youngest editor in the state; but he 
made a success of this responsible work, and from Homer he went to 
Lansing, where he joined the staff of Tlic Journal as city editor, and he was 



iS28 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

also connected with The Lansing Republican for about a year, giving his 
employers entire satisfaction in every respect. Still seeking larger fields for 
the exercise of his talent, he went to Detroit where he secured employment 
on The Times. Subsequently he became city editor of the Marquette Min- 
ing Journal in 1905, later working a year on the Kalamazoo Gazette, then 
he returned to Lansing, and in March, 1910, he came to Craw fords ville, Indi- 
ana, and since then has been editor of The Crawfordsville Review, a corpora- 
tion, and he has brought this paper up to a high rank among the papers of 
western Indiana, greatly increasing its circulation and rendering it a valu- 
able advertising medium. 

Mr. Hitchcock is a Democrat. He belongs to the Presbyterian church, 
and fraternally is a member of the Masonic Order, No. ;^Ti. at Lansing, 
Michigan; also belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, at 
Crawfordsville. Mr. Hitchcock has remained unmarried. 



CHARLES WILLIAM ROSS. 

It is the pride of the citizens of this country that there is no limit to 
which natural ability, industry and honesty may not aspire. A boy born in 
ignorance and poverty and reared under the most adverse surroundings may 
nevertheless break from his fetters and rise to the highest station in the land ; 
and the qualities do not have to be of transcendant character to enable him 
to accomplish this result. It is more the way he does it and the skill in 
grasping the opportunities presented than to any remarkable qualities 
possessed by him. Accordingly it is found that very often in this country 
the President, governor and other high public officials possess no greater 
ability than thousands of other citizens. They have simply taken better ad- 
vantage of their circumstances than their fellows, and this truth runs through 
every occupation or vocation. The business man who rises above his fellows 
does so by taking advantage of conditions which others overlook or fail to 
grasp. This seems to be the case with Charles William Ross, for many 
years regarded as one of the foremost business men of Crawfordsville and 
Montgomery county, being very extensively engaged in the real estate and 
loan business. In all walks of life he has so conducted himself as to gain 
and retain the good will and confidence of all classes, and in every movement 
looking to the improvement of his locality in any way his support may 
always be depended upon. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 829 

Mr. Ross was born in Iroquois county, Illinois, May 4, 1864. on a fann. 
He is the scion of an excellent Irish ancestry, many of whose winning char- 
acteristics he seems to have inherited. He is a son of .Alexander and Mary 
(Johnson) Ross. The father was Ixirn in Ireland. June 18, 1832. His 
father died when he was about fi\e years of age and when sixteen years old 
he accompanied his mother to America. The father and liusl>and was a 
minister in the Methodist church and spent his life in Ireland. Upon com- 
ing to the United States Alexander and his mother located in Tippecanoe 
county, Indiana, on a farm, and the son continued to follow agricultural pur- 
suits. He hired out until i860 then bought a farm for himself and moved 
on it, operating the same until 1863 when he mo\-ed to Ircxpiois county, Illi- 
nois, and he remained there until 1867 when he removed to Lafayette, Indi- 
ana, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring in 1905. Upon 
the commencement of the gold fever period in 1849 '""^ ^^'^s one of the brave 
band to make the tedious and hazardous journey across the plains of Cali- 
fornia. Politically, he was a Republican, belonged to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and was a memlser of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
i860 he married Mary Johnson, who was born on Decemljer 18, 1832, in 
Sweden, from which country she came to the L'nited States when fourteen 
years of age, locating in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, with her l)rother. Her 
death occurred in 1886. To this union eight children were born. 

Charles W. Ross received a public school education, and he was gradu- 
ated from Purdue University at Lafayette, Indiana, with the class of 1889, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Science. While in school he spent his sum- 
mers engaged in the general contracting business — road and bridge building 
Soon after leaving college he came to Crawfordsville and engaged in the gen- 
eral mercantile business with ever increasing success until 1898, when he 
launched out in the real estate, loan and insurance business, and this he has 
continued to the present time on a veiy extensi\-e scale, maintaining the 
largest office of its kind in this section of the state, employing an office force 
of six people and thirty men in the tield. His operations extend over a large 
territory and he is widely known as one of Crawfordsville's most substantial 
and enterprising citizens. He had the di.stinction of being the originator of 
the five per cent, farm loans. During the year 1912 he placed over one 
million dollars in loans. His insurance runs larger every year, representing 
a number of the leading companies of the world. He buys and sells farms, 
in fact all kinds of rural and city property, and this is also a large part of 
his work. At this writing he owns over one thousand acres of land and fifty 



830 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

pieces of city property, all valuable and well kept. No man in Montgomery 
county is better informed on the value of property, country or city. 

Politically, Mr. Ross is a Republican, and in religious matters he is a 
Methodist, and one of the pillars in the local congregation, being a steward, 
and has been a member of the official board for the past twenty-five years. 

Mr. Ross was married on June 23, 1891 to Alice Dee Green, who was 
born near Waynetown, Montgomery county, Indiana, June 23, 1870. She 
is a daughter of George and Mary E. (Holloway) Green, who were early 
settlers of Wayne township and a well known family there. Mr. Green was 
born at Cambridge, New York. He devoted his life successfully to agricul- 
tural pursuits, and his death occurred in January, 1903 at the age of eighty- 
three years. Mrs. Green lives in Crawfordsville, being now advanced in 
years. 



EMERSON ETI^ERIDGE BALLARD. 

Success is achieved only by the exercise of certain distinguishing qualities 
and it cannot be retained without effort. Those by whom great epoch changes 
have been made in the political and industrial world began early in life to pre- 
pare themselves for their peculiar duties and responsibilities and it was only 
by the most persevering and continuous endeavor that they succeeded in rising 
superior to the obstacles in their way and reaching the goal of their ambition. 
Such lives are an inspiration to others who are less courageous and more prone 
to give up the fight before their ideal is reached or definite success in any 
chosen field has been attained. In the life history of the honorable gentleman 
whose name forms the caption of this article we find evidence of a peculiar 
characteristic that always makes for achievement — persistency, coupled with 
fortitude and lofty traits', and as a result of such a life, Mr. Ballard stands to- 
day one of the representative citizens and leading attorneys at law of Mont- 
gomery county, and an author of repute. 

Emerson Etheridge Ballard, who maintains his office and residence in 
Crawfordsville, was born near Wheaton, Putnam county, Indiana, February 
27, 1865. He is a son of William Sanford Ballard and Patience Ann 
(Brown) Ballard, both natives of Kentucky, the father's birth having oc- 
curred in Shelby county. These parents grew up, were educated and married 
in Putnam county, Indiana, where they were brought by their parents in child- 
hood, and they spent their lives engaged in agricultural pursuits. They are 



MONTGO.MKRV COUNTY, INDIANA. 83I 

both deceased. The paternal grandfather, Jesse Ballard, was born in Vir- 
ginia. The maternal grandfather, Samuel Brown, son of Ezekicl I'.rown, 
was born March 19, 1803. Ann C. Glenn, our subject's maternal grand- 
mother, was born May 13. 1802. 

Emerson E. Ballard grew to manhood on the home farm in Putnam 
county and he received his primary education in the district schools there, 
until he was fourteen years old, then attended the hig'h school in Greencastle, 
from which he was graduated in May, 1881, and in thai city he tonk the four 
years' course in DePauw University, making an excellent record and gradu- 
ating with the class of 1885. 

Early in life he determined upon a legal career am! bent e\ery effort to 
thoroughly prepare himself, and he was accordingly admitted to the bar at 
Greencastle on March i, 1886. Two days later we find him in Crawfords- 
ville, entering the practice of his profession in partnership with his brother, 
Tilghman E. Ballard, which continued until November, 189S, and met 
with pronounced success. Beginning with the year 1888 the firm, in con- 
nection with its law practice, engaged in the work of editing and publishing 
law books, which was continued until the dissolution of the firm. Since that 
time our subject has been engaged as a law book editor, meeting with e\'er 
increasing success until today he is recognized as an authority in this line 
throughout the country. Ballard's law of Real Property, a national serial 
publication, now consisting of fourteen volumes, was founded by Mr. Ballard 
and his brother, Tilghman E., in 1892. The first five volumes were jointly 
edited and published by them; but beginning with the sixth volume Emerson 
E. has been the editor of this popular and meritorious publication, with the 
exception of two volumes, which is now published by T. H. Flood & Company, 
law book publishers of Chicago. During the past si.x years our subject has 
done considerable work on the lecture platform, giving special emphasis to 
the temperance work, and he is regarded wherever he has appeared as an 
earnest, forceful, entertaining and elocjuent speaker. 

Emerson E. Ballard was married on December 19, 1888 to Ella F. Clod- 
felter, a lady of many estimable attributes, who was a daughter of Mathias 
Clodfelter and Mary Magdelen (Saylor) Clodfelter. 

To our subject and wife two children have been born, namely: Ella 
Maurine Ballard, born on August 7, 1891 ; and Cecil May Ballard, born on 
August 20, 1895, and her death occurred on October 24, 1899. 

Politically, Mr. Ballard is a Democrat and has ever been loyal in his sup- 
port of the fundamental principles of Democracy. Fraternally, he is a mem- 



S32 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ber of Montgomery Lodge, No. 50, Free and Accepted Masons ; Crawfords- 
ville Chapter No. 40, Royal Arch Masons; Montgomery Council No. 34, 
Royal and Select Masons; Crawfordsville Commandery, No. 25 Knights 
Templar, and Athens Chapter No. 97, Order Eastern Star. 



THE GRIFFITH FAMILY. 

The following history of the Griffith family, of which Dr. Thomas J. 
Grififith, of Crawfordsville, is a member, was written by the Doctor especially 
for this work in Montgomery county, in the spring of 1913 : 

My father gave me the legendary fragments known to him of the 
Griffith family. It is a Welch name and was originally spelled Gryfyth. 
Three brothers came to America some time in 1600, landing at Philadelphia, 
and settled on the Brandywine river and became opulant, but during the 
Revolutionary war sold their possessions for Continental money and were 
made poor. 

My great-grandfather, Joseph Griffith, was a soldier of the Revolution- 
ary war and was the first Revolutionary soldier buried at Indianapolis, in 
1823. There is eleven pounds, English money due his heirs, on statement to 
me from the War Department. My great-grandfather, Joseph Griffith was 
married to Mary Thornton, an English woman, and to them were born 
Abraham, in 1774; Sarah, in 1777; John, in 1778; Joseph, in 1780; Elizabeth, 
in 1783, and Amos in 1786. My great-grandmother was lost in making a 
visit across the Allegheny mountains and no trace of her could be found. 
Abraham Griffith, my grandfather, was bom in Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 31, 1774, and was married to Joanna John, a grand aunt 
of Dr. D. P. John, of DePauw University, October 12, 1798. Joanna died 
August 12, 1815, at one o'clock in the morning in Frederick county, Mary- 
land. 

To Abraham and Joanna Griffith was born Lydia T., Hannah, Thorn- 
ton, (my father), Townsend, Barton and Clifford. Grandfather, with his 
brother, Amos, and sons Townsend and Barton, came west after the death of 
his wife, and two grown daughters, Lydia and Hannah, about 1822 or 1823, 
and settled in Covington, Indiana. In 1824 Abraham Griffith, paternal grand- 
father, took the contract to build the first jail in Crawfordsville for the 
princely sum of two hundred and forty-three dollars. It stood in the rear of 
Albert Miller's theatorium, and its dimensions were as follows: "To be 




DR. THOS. J. GRIFFITH 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 833 

twenty-four by twenty feet from out to out. the foundation to be laid with 
stone sunk eighteen inches under ground and to be twelve inches above the 
ground and to be three feet wide on which there is to be built with logs, hewed 
twelve inches square, double walls with a vacancy of one foot between the 
walls ; the vacancy between the walls to be filled with peeled poles, not more 
than six inches thick." 

Grandfather died here June 19, 1829, in a double log house tiiat stood 
on the southwest corner of Green and Market streets, and together with his 
son. Barton, a capable young business man of Covington, and contracted a 
malignant fever on a business trip to New Orleans, and died soon after 
reaching home; this was in 1834, and he was brought here and buried be- 
side his father, in the old town cemeter)% and I am very sorry indeed to say 
that their graves are forever lost to the knowledge of the Griffith family. 
Barton was unmarried. 

Thornton Griffith, my father, came west later than his father and 
brothers. He was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, July 8, 1799. He 
was in the Island of Porto Rico in the summer of 1825. superintending the 
building of a wharf for a Philadelphian sugar company, when a three-mast 
schooner came into San Juan, with a double-decked cargo of five hundred 
negroes from Africa, all in mother nature's costume and unloaded them on 
the beach to clean up, and the third day they were gone for some American 
port. This exhibition of man's inhumanity to man, made an abolitionist of 
my father. In the campaign of Gen. William Henry Harrison here in 1834 
he was honored by a committee of Crawfordsville citizens to deliver the ad- 
dress of welcome, which was made at the southeast corner of Main and 
Washington streets. 

February 4, 1836, he was married to I\iary A. Hall, daughter of Thomas 
and Margaret (Herron) Hall, who was l)orn in New Berry county. South 
Carolina, June 18, 1807. Her mother died in South Carolina, December 10, 
1821, leaving several children. James F. Hall, iier brother, was one of the 
county commissioners that built our court liouse. Her father and mother 
were born in Moneheim county, Ireland, and landed at Charleston, South 
Carolina, in 1765. Two of Grandfather Hall's brothers were soldiers in the 
Revolutionary war, in Gen. Francis Marion's army, one being an officer. 

Mv parents were married at "Fruit's Corner." in Ripley township, 
Montgomer}- county, and moved in the spring of 1836 to the wilds of Clin- 
ton county, on Wild Cat creek, four miles northeast of Frankfort, on a 
hundred and sixty acre tract that had been entered from the government. 
(53) 



834 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Here, in a twelve by twelve log cabin they began the battle of life, with 
wolves and wild-cats for nocturnal serenaders. Father taught school one or 
more winters in a log school house, with greased paper for window lights, and 
slabs with wooden legs for seats and slabs for flooring. About that time he 
was a candidate for the Legislature, on the Whig ticket, from the counties 
of Clinton and Montgomery, which counties were largely Democratic. He 
said that it became apparent that he would be elected, when the "Demos" 
started a falsehood and defeated him. This so disgusted him he would never 
again be a candidate for office. He was a man of pleasing address, an easy 
and fluent speaker, invincible in argument, a great reader and of good 
memory. An honest man, detesting hypocrisy. He was a member of the 
Friends church, but having that broad catholicity, characteristic of his bene- 
volent spirit. In his latter years, when "moved'" he frequently preached to 
the Friends. He passed to the spirit life from his home in Darlington, June 
2^, 1869, when nearly seventy years of age; his ashes repose in Odd Fellows 
beautiful cemetery. Three children made glad my father's Clinton county 
home: Thomas ].. born April 2, 1837; Joanna M., born November 25, 
1839; Nancy E., born August i, 1842. Joanna departed this life February 
13, 1865. in her twenty-sixth year, from cerebro-spinal meningitis, the re- 
sult of exposure while teaching school. Nancy E. was married to Joseph 
Binford, December 19, 1861, and resides in Crawfordsville. 

My mother was a noble, thoughtful woman, devoted to her home and 
family. A devout Presbyterian and she passed to spirit life November 3, 
1886, and her dust rests beside father's in lovely Odd Fellows cemetery. Her 
father deserves mention in this connection. He had convictions that slavery 
was wrong, but he could not free^them in South Carolina, as it was against 
the law, so he told them to look around and choose their masters without 
breaking families. This they did. Then he removed to Butler county, Ohio, 
and remained there about two years, when, with his children, Thomas, John 
A., James F., Mary A., Elizabeth. Nancy and Henry L., he came to Ripley 
township, this county, the now "Fruit's Corner," in 1829, and purchased a 
large farm and died there in 1848, and is buried in the old cemetery, one- 
half mile west of Yountsville. For fifty years he was a ruling elder in the 
Associate ^feeformed Presbyterian church. He was a very conscientious man. 

We now return to the Griffith history. Townsend Griffith, a brother of 
my father, was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, April 4, 1801, and 
came to Crawfordsville in 1822 and was married to Mahala Catterlin, No- 
vember I, 1827; she was the daughter of Ephriam Catterlin, a pioneer settler 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 835 

near the town. Townsend was prominent in the early development of the 
county, both in politics and civic offices. He was an whole-souled man, hos- 
pitable,genial and jolly, with the proverbial latch-string always on the out- 
side. In the summer of 1852 he made a business trip to Minnesota and died 
of cholera June 2, 1852, at Galena, Illinois, on his return trip. After a time 
his remains were brought home and rest in the Masonic cemetery. To them 
were born — Matilda, one of the first children born in Crawfordsville, and 
who married Benjamin F. Galey. Mr. Galey died many years ago, and Mrs. 
Galey passed away only recently, in her eighty-fifth year. Sarah A. married 
George Worbington, of a prominent family here, and who died many years 
ago. She is living, and is the mother of Benjamin and Charley Worbington; 
Ephraim C. and Amanda (twins), born January 5,. 1833. Amanda married 
Morgan Snook, a son of Dr. Henry Snook, who was one of the pioneer phy- 
sicians here and a brother-in-law of Dr. Samuel B. Morgan, a leading physi- 
cian here in the early days. 24mQ'^*? 

Ephraim married Mary J. Brassfield, February 14, 1855": ^s wife was 
born August 5, 1837. He died February n, 1901. and was noted for his 
hustling business abilities and did an extensive mechanical contracting busi- 
ness. Mrs. Griffith is living with her son, Howard, in the enjoyment of 
good health. To them were born: Cieorge, the architect: Frank E., who 
died young; William Douglass married Agnes A. Walsh, December 14. 19 10: 
Howard E. and Birdie, all of Crawfordsville 

Ephriam Griffith was full of civic pride, and the citizens appreciated his 
efiforts bv electing him councilman and again a member of the school board, 
which positions he worthily filled. 

Now back to the family of Townsend: Mary, who married Charles 
Bowen, for many years editor of the Craicfordsz'ille Re7'icu'. both have passed 
to future life, leaving two children — Arthur and Clara ; she is married and 
resides in Kansas. Rebecca, who died in infancy. Abraham, who lived to 
manhood and was thrown from a horse and killed. John Warner, who was 
an express messenger from Indianapolis to St. Louis, and was killed in a 
railroad wreck. He was married and his widow lives in Indianapolis. Sam- 
uel Morgan (named for their Doctor), who died in infancy. George, son 
of Ephriam and Mary Griffith, was married to Ida M. Caster, March 10, 
1880. He was born in Crawfordsville, March 12, 1856. William Douglass, 
born June 22, 1861 : Frank E.. born June 9. 1858; Howard E., born Decem- 
ber 30, 1876. 

Two sons were born to George and Ida Griffith — Claude and Karl. 



836 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Claude married Helen Nolan and has one son. Karl is married and lives in 
Urbana, Illinois, and has four daughters. 

Rev. Thomas Griffith, a cousin of my father, was the first Methodist 
minister in Craw^fordsville. He preached in a small frame church, where the 
present Methodist Episcopal church stands. He married Lucy Daniels, and 
was a brother-in-law of John Crawford, a pioneer merchant here. He was 
acting postmaster during Major Elston's term of office. Their sons were 
John and Thomas B. John was a druggist and died many years ago. Thomas 
was a brave soldier in the famous Eighty-sixth Indiana Infantry in the war 
of the Rebellion. After the war he married Amanda Wilhite, October 15, 
1864, by whom was born William Griffith. Thomas B. died thirty years ago, 
and his remains lie in Masonic cemetery. 

The Rev. Thomas Griffith's grave is in the old town cemetery unknown 
and unmarked, the most neglected public cemetery in Montgomery county. 

Amos Griffith, my grandfather's brother, went to Warren county in 
1830 and married an Indian woman with a large land inheritance. My 
father visited them about 1832, and their home was a model of cleanliness. 
No children were bom to them. Further of his history, I know nothing. 

I have now given a brief and truthful history of the Griffith family, of 
which I am a descendant, which will connect the past with the future, and 
which I hope may be maintained by some future historian. 

I am not without pride for family history. 



WILLIAM R. COLEMAN. 

The business man who rises abo\'e his fellows does so by taking advan- 
tage of conditions which others overlook or fail to grasp. This has been 
very largely the case with William R. Coleman. In all that constitutes true 
manhood and good citizenship he is a worthy example and none stands higher 
than he in the esteem and confidence in the circles in which he moves. His 
career has been characterized by duty well perfonned, by faithfulness to every 
trust reposed in him, by industry, thrift, and wisely directed efforts, which has 
resulted in the accumulation of a comfortable share of this world's goods, be- 
sides earning a reputation which has never been clouded by the commission 
of unworthy acts. 

Mr. Coleman was born in Union township, Montgomery county, on 
September 7, 1869. He is a son of Henderson J. and Deborah (Edwards) 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. St,/ 

Coleman. The father was born in Scott county, Indiana. January 14. 1S29. 
a son of John and Mary (Jacobs) Coleman. Mis parents came to Scott 
county from Franklin county. Indiana, and lived there until 1833 wht-n they 
came to Montgomery county, Incatin.i.;- in L'nion township, where they spent 
the rest of their lives on a farm, the father dyini;- in April, 1.S74 at the ai^e of 
eighty-four years and the mother's death occurred in 1804 at the age of sixty- 
eight years. Henderson J. Coleman received a good common school educa- 
tion, and he began life for himself by teaching school. He enjoyed the 
distinction of being the champion penman of his county. Later he turned his 
attention to farming which he continued through life with success, also studied 
to be a veterinary physician, and he practiced for a period of twenty-five years, 
becoming one of the best known veterinaries in this section of the state. It 
was his custom to buy diseased and disabled horses and cure them, selling 
them for handsome profits. In 1880 he gave up his farm of one hundred and 
sixty-eight acres and devoted all his time and attention to veterinary work. 
He had the confidence of all the farmers for he did his work well and con- 
scientiously. He was a Republican, and fraternally was a Mason. His 
death occurred in 1905. He and Deborah Edwards were married in Mont- 
gomery county on September 16, 1836. She was born on March 6, 1833 and 
is still living, making her home with the subject of this sketch. 

William R. Coleman, well known druggist of Craw fords ville, was edu- 
cated in the common schools of his native county and he spent two years in 
Wabash College. He finished his education as a pharmacist in Chicago, 
graduating there in 1891. He returned to Crawfordsville and worked for 
Smith & Myers, later worked as clerk in drug stores in Cincinnati and Indi- 
anapolis, for a few years, then returned to Crawfordsville, and worked for 
R. C. Smith, later for J. H. Whitneck. In 1898 he began the drug business 
in Crawfordsville for himself on North Green street, remaining there three 
years, then purchased his present place in the Crawford Hotel block, in 190T. 
and has since successfully conducted the same, enjoying a large and ever grow- 
ing trade with the city and surrounding country, always keeping a large and 
carefully selected stock of modern drugs and drug sundries, his store being 
a neat, attractive and well kept one. In 1904 he associated with the United 
Drug Company, manufacturers of the Rexall remedies. He carries a large 
line of the same, in connection with a full stock of prescription drugs and 
patent medicines. 

Fraternally, Mr. Coleman is a member of the Masonic Order, including 
the Council, also the Improved Order of Red Men, the Patriotic Order Sons 



838 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of America, also Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Politically, he is a 
Progressive, and in religious matters a Baptist. 

Mr. Coleman was married in November, 1893 to Mabel Smith, a native 
of Kentucky, and after a brief and happy married life, she was called to her 
rest in the spring of 1904. 



CHARLES E. BUTLER. 

Under a popular form of government like that of the United States, 
where the democratic idea of equality is as fully developed as the present im- 
perfect condition of mankind will permit, we expect as its legitimate result 
the triumph of individual worth and energy over all the competition that 
wealth and class may array against them. Here the avenues of wealth and 
distinction are fully opened to all, which fact enhances rather than detracts 
from the merits of those whose energy and integrity have triumphed over all 
obstacles intervening between humble position and the attainment of those 
ends. Obscurity and labor, at no time dishonorable, never assume more at- 
tractive features than when the former appears as the nurse of those virtues 
which the latter, by years of honest and persevering effort, transplants to a 
higher and richer soil ; hence the biographer of those men of sterling worth 
whose active enterprise has won for them the distinction, pre-eminence and 
commanding influence in the society in which they move must be replete with 
facts which should encourage and instruct the young. Such a man is Charles 
E. Butler, well known citizen of Crawfordsville, who has done as much, if 
not more, than any other man to encourage better methods of farming in 
Montgomery county, and by the exercise of those talents and characteristics 
which were cultivated from his youth, has reached an honorable position in 
the public mind and earned the respect and high esteem of his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Butler was born March 7, 1866, in Franklin township, Montgom- 
ery county. He is a son of Mahlon and Eunice (Lacy) Butler. The father 
was born on January 27, 1821, in Virginia, coming to Indiana at the early 
age of six months, and in 1834 he came with the rest, of the family to Mont- 
gomery county. They settled in Franklin township, in a Qfuaker cominunity, 
and among them was organized the Friends church in that township. The 
father of the subject spent the rest of his life in that township and there fol- 
lowed general farming. There he built a house ready for his bride, a gentle, 
kind and true Christian woman, whom he brought from Rush county, In- 
diana, and in that same house the father and mother of the subject always 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 839 

lived after coming to this county, until her death, on June 27, 1902. Mahlon 
Butler owned a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres, on which he car- 
ried on general farming and stock raising. Politically, he was a Reublican, 
but he never held office, being a dignified, quiet home man and a steady-going 
Quaker. His death occurred on March 5, 1904. His family consisted of 
five children, of whom Charles E., of this sketch, is the only one living, he 
having been the youngest of the family: the others were Emiline, Emily, 
Jennie and Lindley M., all deceased. 

Charles E. Butler grew to manhood on the home farm and there he 
assisted with the general work of the farm. He received his early education 
in the common schools and tiie high school, and later was a student in Wa- 
bash College. 

On October 10, 1888, he married Hallie L. Mount, who was born in 
Montgomery county, Franklin township, on August 18, 1868. She is a 
daughter of James A. and Catherine (Boyd) Mount. He was born March 
23, 1843, ^"d his death occurred on January 16, 1901. His wife was born in 
1849, ^n*^! her death occurred on July 6, 1905. James A. Mount became 
governor of Indiana, and was one of the most popular and efficient executives 
the state has ever had. A complete sketch of this distinguished man appears 
on other pages of this work. Mrs. Butler received a good education in the 
common schools here, later attended a college m Kentucky, from which she 
was graduated. She is a lady of culture and refinement and has always Ijeen 
popular with a wide circle of friends. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Butler three children have been born, namely : Everett, 
born on August 18, 1891, graduated from Crawfordsville high school, and is 
at present farming: Lois, born July 6, 1897, is attending high school: Gladys, 
born September 4, 1900, is also in school at Crawfordsville. 

Mr. Butler has spent nearly all his life on the farm in P>anklin township. 
He has made general farming and stock raising his chief life work and he has 
succeeded beyond the average agriculturalist, partly because he has made a 
more careful study of modern methods of tilling the soil, and partly because 
he has applied himself persistently and assiduously to whatever task he has 
had in hand. Mr. and Mrs. Butler's farm includes the two original Mount 
and Butler homesteads. It is deemed by them a privilege and responsibility to 
have in their possession these sacred spots, wrought into them, as there is, so 
much of the life of their loved ones. The scenes of their happy childhood 
days filled with memories of self-sacrificing, devoted parents, where the 
bravest struggles of hardships were met and conquered and the days of beau- 
tiful home life and happiness were ])assed. They are the owners of one of 



840 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the finest, best-improved and most productive farms in Montgomery county, 
consisting of four hundred and fifty-five acres in Franklin township, all being 
cultivated or consisting of the best blue grass pastures. Here is carried on 
a general line of farming and stock raising, some excellent grades of live 
stock being found about his place at all seasons. He raises and feeds stock 
of all kinds for the market, shipping large numbers of fat cattle, hogs and 
sheep each year. He has a commodious and comfortable dwelling of modern 
style on his farm, where they spend their summers, also an excellent group 
of outbuildings. But they spend their winters in Crawfordsville, on account 
of school facilities, owning a beautiful home at 708 East Main street. 

Politically, Mr. Butler is a Republican, and while he has always been 
loyal in his support of the party and been actively engaged in politics, he has 
never sought or held office, preferring to devote his attention exclusively to 
his large farming and stock raising industries. For years he has been offi- 
cially identified with the Farmers' Institute work of the county. He is presi- 
dent of the Better Farming Association of Montgomery county, and for two 
years has been president of the Agricultural Society of Montgomery County. 
He is at present secretary of the State Farmers' Congress of Indiana. He 
has filled these important positions in a manner that has reflected much credit 
upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. He has done 
a great work in encouraging better and more scientific methods in general 
farming and stock raising and is regarded as an authority on modern twen- 
tieth century methods, and his advice is frequently sought along these lines 
and is invariably followed with gratifying results. 

Mr. Butler is a member of the Knights of Pythias of Crawfordsville, 
and religiouslv holds membership with tlie Center Presbyterian church here. 



FORGISON GRAHAM McINTIRE. 

One of the leading citizens of Montgomery county is Forgison Graham 
Mclntire, for a long lapse of years one of our most enterprising agricul- 
turists, manufacturers and business men. Mr. Mclntire is a public-spirited 
man in all that the term implies, being e\-er interested in enterprises tending 
to promote the general welfare and has withheld his support from no mo\'e- 
ment for the good of the locality so long honored by his residence. His per- 
sonal relations with his fellow men have ever been mutually pleasant and 




FORGISON G. MflNTIRE 



MONTGOMERY COL'XTV, INDIANA. 84I 

agreeable, and he is highly regarded by all, being easily a])])roache(l, obliging 
and straightforward in all the relations of life. 

Mr. Mclntire, who is the scion of one of the worthy old pioneer families 
of Montgomery county, members of which have figured prominently in the 
upbuilding of the same for more than three-quarters of a century, was born in 
Wayne township, this county, January 21, 1841. He is a son of John and 
Eliza (Burbridge) Mclntire. The father was born on January 20, 1807, 
near Harper's Ferry, Virginia. The family later moved to Kentuck\-, and in 
the early twenties came on to Montgomery county, Indiana, settling in Wayne 
township, when tliis country was a wilderness and settlers were few. Here 
John Mclntire entered one hundred and sixty acres from the government, in 
1829, and up to 1910 the same was kept in the family. His father, Jacob 
Mclntire, bought one hundred and sixty acres in the same township. John 
cleared his farm and worked it with gratifying results until 1850, when his 
death occurred. Politically, he was a Whig and was a deacon in the Baptist 
church. In 1830 he married Eliza Burbridge. She was born in Chillicothe, 
Ohio, February 2, 181 5, and when a child accompanied her family, in 1823, 
to Montgomery county, Indiana, her parents settling near the farm of Henry 
Oldfield, who was the first settler of Montgomery county. The father, Wil- 
liam Burbridge, entered three hundred and twenty acres of land there wliich 
he developed into a good farm, and thereon he liuilt, in 1827, the first brick 
house ever erected in this county. The same is still .standing and is in use. 
The late Mrs. Mclntire carried the brick with which to build the same. Wm. 
Burbridge was elected to the ofifice of associate judge of the c<)unt>-, and he 
served the people most faithfully and acceptably. He was \-er}- influential 
in public affairs and was one, of the substantial and leading men of the county. 
At one time he owned a large extent of \-aluable property on West Market 
street, Crawfordsville. His death occurred in 1868. 

The death of Mrs. John Mclntire occurred on Januar>- 3, 1903. 

Ten children were born to John Mclntire and wife, three of whom are 
living, namelv: Forgison G., of this review; Rachael, wife of C. D. Cruse, 
of Crawfordsville; and Emma, of Crawfordsville. 

Forgison G. Mclntire received what education he could in the common 
schools of his native vicinity in those early days, and at the age of fourteen 
years he took charge of the home farm, and continued to operate the same 
with skill and gratifying results until 1864. when he proved In's patriotism, by 
enlisting in Company H, One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Indiana \'olunteer 



842 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Infantry, and he served very faithfully, principally in garrison duty, until he 
was mustered out the following October. 

Returning to the farm he continued to operate the same with his usual 
success until 1872. He prospered and purchased various farms in different 
parts of the county, which he operated on an extensive scale until 1885 when 
he moved to Crawfordsville, where he went into the fence manufacturing 
business, which he continued for a period of fifteen years, building up an 
extensive and lucrative business and enjoying an excellent trade all over the 
country. While on the farm he engaged in the threshing business and he 
still is interested in that line of work. He has shown himself to be a capable 
business man and has carried to successful completion whatever he has at- 
tempted. He is today one of the solid financial men of Crawfordsville. 

Mr. Mclntire has always taken an abiding interest in public matters, 
especially as affecting Montgomery county. He was twice elected assessor 
of Union township, serving from 1900 to 1908, in a manner that reflected 
much credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. 
In 1909 he was elected to the city council of Crawfordsville, and is now 
president of the improvement board of that body, which is quite an important 
office, and he is filling the same in a commendable manner. He is also chair- 
man of the board of public schools and buildings. He is a member of the 
counts and claims commission. He belongs to McPherson Post, Grand Army 
of the Republic, and has been a member of the Masonic Order for the past 
fifty-two years. Politically he is a Republican, and in religious matters is a 
Baptist. 

Mr. Mclntire was married on March 28. 1872 to Rhoda May Utterback, 
who was born in Wayne township, this county, on adjoining farm from that 
of the Mclntires, the date of her birth being z^ugust i, 1840. She was a 
daughter of Harmon and Eliza (Wilson) Utterback, a well known and highly 
respected family, early settlers here. The father was a native of Ohio, born 
there in 1811. 

The death of Mrs. Mclntire occurred on October 27,, 1885. 

To Forgison G. Mclntire and wife were born four children, namely: 
Georgia, wife of W. A. Whittington, of Crawfordsville; Verna Laura, who 
is the wife of W. H. Schleppy, of Los Angeles, California; Selma May, wife 
of William Saunders, of Tacoma, Washington; Harmon A., a printer of 
Crawfordsville. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 843 

CAPT. \V. B. CARR. 

Who will gainsay that a citizen i)f this country ever wore a greater badge 
of honor than the distinction of having suffered and bled in the service of the 
Union, for its preservation, during the great conflict between the states. It is 
a worthy inheritance that ought to be highly esteemed by all succeeding gener- 
ations. But the ranks of the old phalanx, as heroic as those which followed 
the vaunted plume of Caesar, Hannibal or Alexander, are fast falling before 
the only I'oe they cannot meet, the King of Terrors, and ere long none will 
be left to recount the thrilling experiences of that sanguinary time. In the 
meantime, while they are still with us, let us pay them suitable honor for tlieir 
sacrifices, sufferings and patriotism. One of this number is Capt. W. B. 
Carr, one of Montgomery county's well known men and public-spirited citi- 
zens, who, for many years, ranked among our progressive general farmers, 
but who is now li\-ing in honoraljle retirement, spending his declining years 
in quiet. 

Captain Carr. was born in Union count)". Indiana, on Jul\- 8. 1841. He 
is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth Carr. The father came to Montgomery 
county in 1855 and here spent the rest of his life, his death occurring in 1876, 
in his seventy-ninth year. He was a minister in the Christian church for o\er 
sixty years, during which time he did an incalculable amount of good among 
the pioneers, among whom he was well known and held in the highest esteem, 
being a man of fine mind, charitable, helpful iinpulses and exemplary char- 
acter, always ready to assist those in need. He was the old-time type of 
preacher, the kind not frequently met with nowadays, that delighted in 
spreading the Gospel because he felt impressed to do so and not with a view 
of financial remuneration. Indeed, he never depended upon his work in the 
pulpit for support, during all his years in the work of the work, but followed 
all week long his trade of blacksmith and tool maker, jireaching on Sundays. 
He was an ardent Republican. 

Captain Carr was fourteen years of age when he renio\ed with his par- 
ents from Union to Montgomery county and here he has since made his home. 
He received a fairly good education in the common schools, and spent two 
years in Wabash College.When only fourteen years of age he went to Cali- 
fornia, during the gold fever days, and there he spent four years, after which 
he returned to Crawfordsville. He talks most interestingly of his experiences 
in the Far West as well as of the great Civil war in which he has an envial)Ie 
record, having enlisted in Xovember, 1861 in Company K, Fifty-eighth Indi- 



844 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ana Volunteer Infantiy. For meritorious conduct and faithful service he was 
promoted from a private to orderly sergeant and finally to captain of his 
company, under General Buell, in Kentucky, and he served in this capacity 
during a number of important campaigns and battles, in a manner that re- 
flected much credit upon himself and to the praise of his superior officers and 
his men. In 1863 the regiment veteranized and Captain Carr returned to 
Crawrfordsville and raised men for a one hundred day service, as Company D, 
One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was honor- 
ably discharged and mustered out in September, 1864. 

After his career in the army Captain Carr returned to Montgomery 
county where he turned his attention to general farming which he followed 
with continuous success until a few years ago when, having accumulated a 
competency for his old age, he retired from the active duties of life. 

Captain Carr married Emma Jeanetta Baker, a native of Montgomery 
county, in 1866, and here she grew to womanhood and was educated. She 
was the daughter of J. G. and Eliza (Whetstine) Baker. He was a native of 
Ohio; his people lived in Illinois in early life and later came to this county, 
where they farmed for many years, mo\'ing to Wyoming in March, 1909. 
Both the father and mother of Mrs. Carr are living. He was always a 
farmer. He was a Republican, but not active in public affairs. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church and acti\-e in work of same. He 
held many important offices in the church. 



JAMES NOLEMAN SANDERS. 

The Union soldier during the great war between the states builded wiser 
than he knew. Through four years of suffering and wasting hardships, 
through the horrors of prison pens and amid the shadows of death, he laid 
the superstructure of the greatest temple ever erected and dedicated to human 
freedom. The world looked on and called those soldiers sublime, for it was 
theirs to reach out the mighty arm of power and strike the chains from off 
the slave, preserve the country from dissolution, and to keep furled to the 
breeze the only flag that ever made tyrants tremble and whose majestic stripes 
and scintillating stars are still waving universal liberty to all the earth. For 
all these unmeasured deeds the living present will never repay them. One of 
this mighty host of heroes is James Noleman Sanders, who for many years 
was one of the leading farmers and stock men of Montgomery county and 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 845 

who is now living in honorable retirement in his ])leasant home in the city of 
Crawfordsville, enjoying the Irnits of his former years of toil and endeavor, 
and also enjoying the friendship and esteem of all whd know him and who 
wish him many years yet of happy life. 

Mr. Sanders was born on a farm in Adams county, Ohin, March 17, 
1838, and is a son of John \V. and Mariah (Winters) Sanders. The father 
was born in the District of Columbia, July 4, 1792. His father was captain 
of a ship, and was lost at sea, thus leasing John W. Sanders, his son, an 
orphan. The latter remained in the h^ast until 1818 when he came among the 
early pioneers to Adams county, Ohio. He was by trade a house joiner, mak- 
ing doors, sashes, etc. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and fought at 
the battle of Lundy's Lane. His death occurred in Adams county, Ohio in 
1877. Politically, he was a Democrat. His wife had died of the cholera in 
1851, when that dread scourge swept the country. They were the parents of 
nine children, four of whom are still living. 

James N. Sanders quit school when thirteen years of age, and l)egan 
working on a farm, also in a saw nnil, following these lines of endeaxnr until 
he was eighteen years old, when he went to Illinois and worked on a farm 
four years, then came to Montgomery county and worked on a farm f(jr three 
years, after which he went back to Adams county, Ohio, and while there 
enlisted for service in the Federal army in Company A, Seventieth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, on February 28, 1864. He saw service in the Atlanta 
campaign, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea, and through the 
Carolinas, to Washington City. Although in many hotly contested engage- 
ments the nearest he came to being wounded was when a bullet was stopped 
by the folds of the blanket he carried on his hack. He was honorably dis- 
charged from the service and mustered out on .\ugust 2S. 1863. He returned 
to Ohio. Having in the meantime learned the carpenter's trade he worked 
at that for awhile. He later turned his attention to farming and handling 
stock for the market, and met with much success all along the line. He came 
to Montgomery county in the winter of 1869 and up to eight years ago con- 
tinued farming and stock raising on an extensive scale, with his usual success 
in Union township. Having accumulated a competency he retired from the 
active duties of the farm and moved to his pleasant and attractive home in 
Crawfordsville in 1904 where he is still residing. 

Mr. Sanders is a member of the McPherson Post, Grand .\rmy of the 
Republic. Politically, he is a Republican. 

Mr. Sanders was married on January i. 1870 to Susan M. Shanklin, of 



846 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Montgomery county, her birth having occurred on June 23, 1842, and she is a 
daughter of a highly respected old family. 

To our subject and wife four children have been born, namely: Etta 
May, wife of Frank Bennett, lives in Union township, this county; Ida, is the 
wife of E. Cowan; Elva, is the wife of A. Pruett; and Charles, who lives on a 
farm in this county. 



HENRY J. ROACH. 

The progenitors of Henry J. Roach, the efficient and trustworthy man- 
ager of the Crawfordsville Water & Gas Company, were, on the paternal side, 
natives of Ireland, in fact, no further back than the father, however, the major 
portion of his life was spent in the United States. However, our subject 
seems to have inherited many of the winning and commendable traits of the 
Celtic race. 

Mr. Roach was born in Chicago, May 4, 1866, and he is a son of Henry 
J. and Sarah (Watt) Roach. Henry J. Roach was born in Cork, Ireland, 
and he was three years old when his parents brought him to America and here 
he grew to manhood and was educated. When a young man he took up rail- 
roading and, being alert and industrious as well as trustworthy, his rise was 
rapid and he followed this vocation all his active life, reaching responsible 
positions and becoming widely known as a railroad man in the Middle West. 
His last official position was that of di\-ision superintendent of the Logans- 
port, Detroit & Wabash Railroad, which responsible post he held for a long 
period with the usual satisfactory and laudable results. He is now living in 
retirement with his son, Henry J., in Crawfordsville. His wife passed to her 
eternal rest in 1891. 

Henry J. Roach received a good common school education, and he began 
life for himself not by following in the footsteps of his father in a business 
way and entering the railroad field, but by taking up the water works cpiestion 
which he has continued to the present time, having mastered the various ins 
and outs of this line. For a number of years he had charge of gangs building 
water works plants at different places, such as Danville, Champaign, Aurora, 
and other places in Illinois and Indiana, and later he had' charge of plants in 
these two states, also Ohio, giving eminent satisfaction in all of them. In 
1912 he came to Crawfordsville as manager of the Crawfordsville Water & 
Gas Company, which position he is holding at this writing and he is doing 
much to improve the local plant and the service. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INOIANA. 847 

Politically, he is a Democrat, hut he has never been especially active in 
public matters. Relii^iously, he belongs to the Presbyterian church, and 
fraternally he is a memlier of tiie Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Roach was married on Decemlier 2^, 1893 ^o Dolly Campbell, of 
Logansport, Indiana, the daughter of Maurice and Mary Cam])l)ell, an excel- 
lent family of that city, where they have long resided. 

To our subject and wife have been born three children, namely : l-'sther. 
Gladys and Mildred, all at home and attending the local schools. 



P. M. L.WXK. M. D. 



Dr. P. M. Payne's name will be held in lasting honor as long as the his- 
tory of Montgomery county endures as erne of the ablest phxsicians that ever 
gave loyal service in behalf of suffering humanity, for his long life has been 
characterized not only by the most adroit professional ability, but also by 
the most profound human sympathy which o\'erleaps mere sentiment to be- 
come an actuating motive, for when a youth he realized that there is no honor 
not founded on genuine worth, that there is a \ital purpose in life and that 
the best and highest accomplishments must come from a well trained mind 
and altruistic heart. Those who know him well are unstinted in their jtraise 
of his genial disposition and his superior ability, his kind nature and his broad- 
mindedness. Older men in the profession here relied upon his judgment and 
younger ones frequently sought his counsel, all admitting his eminence. He 
is now living retired, after a praiseworthy career, and is enjoying the fruits 
of his former years of service to suffering humanity, being one of the \ener- 
able citizens of this locality. He is now eighty-six years old, and his long 
life has been due, no doubt, in large part, to his clean living and right thinking, 
and the voung man might well pattern his life after him. certainly making 
thereby no mistake. 

Dr. Lavne was born in Kentucky in 1827. and is a son of Elisha Layne 
and wife, and he came to Indiana with his father, locating in Montgomery 
county as early as 1830, when the country was wild and inhabitants were few, 
and of those strange times he now tells many cpiaint and interesting stories. 
The Doctor's father was a farmer and school teacher. He was a native of 
Virginia where he was born Xoveml^er 10, 1777. He was a man of rugged 
honestv and courage. Jacob Layne, his grandfather, was a native of Eng- 
land and came to America in an early day. He also taught school. 



840 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Dr. Layne obtained his early education in the woods, according to his 
statement, and this constant contact with nature, was good, for it taught him 
lessons first handed. Those who live much with Mother Nature act naturally 
and gain much that those who shut themselves up in cities do not. When 
only thirteen years of age he began the study of medicine, and two years later 
began reading under Dr. S. W. Bennage, who began practice in Crawfords- 
ville in 1847. I" ^^SS o^^'' subject bought out the practice of his tutor, and 
he remained in active practice here up to a few years ago, being for many de- 
cades one of the best known medical men in this section of the state, always 
enjoying a very wide practice. He is a doctor of the old school, and most of 
his practice was made on horseback in the early days. He had great success. 

Dr. Layne was married in 1856 to Minerva J. Hughes, whose parents 
were among the early settlers in Montgomery county. To this union three 
children were born, namely: Elisha William, born 1863: Elizabeth Julian, 
bom December 18, 1857: John Franklin, born 1869. 

The Doctor's first wife dying in 1875, he married, two years later, Louisa 
Downing, a native of Michigan. They had one child, Minter DeWitt, born 
1880. 

Dr. Layne belongs to the Masons, including the Knights Templar. The 
large success which crowned his life work, coupled with his ripe experience 
and kind heart, enabled him to bring comfort, hope and confidence to the sick 
room and he brought sunshine into many a home through his long years of 
practice. 



PROFESSOR EDMUND OTIS HOVEY, D. D. 

Edmund Otis Hovey, son of Roger and Martha Hovey, was born on 
July 15, 1801, and died March 10, 1877. His immigrant ancestor, Daniel 
Hovey, was a native of Essex county, England, being the son of Richard 
Hovey, and was baptized, August 9, 16 18, in the Waltham Abbey, a church 
dating from Saxon times. He was the youngest of nine children, and the 
only one of them that came to America. On his departure, the rector gave 
him a bulky volume of poems by Du Bartas, to be seen in the Boston Public 
Library, with a record of the above statement. Daniel Hovey, at the age of 
seventeen years, settled in Ipswich, Mass., in 1635; where he had a land 
grant, built a dwelling-house and an adjacent wharf, still known as Hovey's 
Wharf, and his name is given to a street in the town, and to an island near 
by. For a time he lived at Brookfield and later at Hadley ; but finally ended 




^^^^-..^^^ ^^-.^--e^'^^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 849 

his days at Ipswich, where a bronze tablet is erected to his memory. He 
married Abigail Andrews, a daughter of Captain Robert Andrews, who com- 
manded the ill-fated ship, "The Angel Gabriel," that was wrecked off Pema- 
quid, Maine. Her oldest brother was Lieut. John Andrews, who presided 
at the meeting that resisted the tyranny of Sir Edmund Andros, in memory 
of which the Ipswich seal bears the motto: "The Birthplace of American 
Independence, 1687." Another hrDtlier. Thomas Andrews, was the first 
schoolmaster of the colony. 

On his maternal side, Edmund Otis Hovey sprang from the families 
of Freeman, Otis, Moody and Russell — names famous in early annals. Rev. 
John Russell harbored the Regicides for ten years; in the study of his son, 
Rev. Samuel Russell, Yale College was founded ; and Rev. Joshua Moody, 
another ancestor, declined the presidency of Harvard College, preferring to 
be pastor of the first church in Boston. 

James Hovey, son of Daniel, was killed in King Phillip's War. His 
family then moved, first to Maiden, Mass., and later to Mansfield, Connecti- 
cut. Edmund, the son of James, married Margaret Knowlton. Their son, 
Roger Hovey (so named for Roger Williams), after serving twice as a 
soldier in the Army of the Revolution, married Martha, the daughter of Hon. 
Edmund Freeman, a Harvard graduate, who owned one thousand acres in 
Mansfield. Mr. Freeman also received, in recognition of his public services, 
a noble land grant from George III. including in all twenty-four thousand 
four hundred acres, on both sides of the Connecticut river, which was later 
subdivided into the four towns of Norwich and Hartford (in Vermont) and 
Lebanon and Hanover (in New Hampshire). A singular stipulation in this 
land grant was that there should be paid to the Crown, "one ear of Indian 
corn only, on December 25th of each year, if demanded." Edmund Free- 
man's name, and those of his five sons, head the list of names on the original 
charter of the Hanover colony, dated July 4, 1761. There were fourteen 
heads of families named Freeman in 1770 when Dartmouth College was 
located at Hanover, with a royal grant of five hundred acres ; all white pine 
trees being reserved "for His Majesty's Navy." Forty years after Hanover 
was settled there were only twenty families there, all living in log cabins, with 
a log meeting house, whose pulpit was a segment of a hollow basswood tree. 
The first college buildings were also of logs. 

Dartmouth Hall was begun in 1786, a brick edifice, one hundred and fifty 
by fifty feet in its dimensions, and three stories high. The historian of the 
college records the fact that "The handles on the doors, with all the ironwork, 
(54) 



850 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

were made by Roger Hovey, a blacksmith, who had a shop on the Parade at 
the Centre." We do not exactly know when he joined the colony, but it is 
recorded that he married Martha (Otis) Freeman, daughter of Edmund 
Freeman, in Hanover, February 6, 1783; and it is the legend that he bought 
his first stock of iron with the wages paid for his services in the Revolutionary 
Army. He not only shod horses and oxen, but made the hinges, andirons, 
and indeed all the ironwork of the colony. His smithy "on the Parade" was 
a rendezvous for the villagers, whose farm-talk and doctrinal discussions 
chimed in with the blows on the anvil. Dartmouth had a stormy infancy, 
and we may gladly pass in silence its voluminous controversies; but we rejoice 
that the principles for which it stood were so firmly planted in the community, 
and so nobly transplanted at a later day to take root in Montgomery County 
and the broad Wabash valley. Roger Hovey was the father of ten children, 
all baptized by Dr. Eden Burroughs, pastor of the Presbyterian church in 
Hanover. Five of them died before the year 1800, victims of an epidemic; 
and the remaining five all lived to be more than seventy years of age. In 
1813 Roger Hovey and his family removed to Thetford, Vermont, where he 
bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, and built a house and black- 
smith-shop. He spent his old age with his eldest son, Frederick Hovey, at 
Berlin, Vermont, enjoying a moderate pension from the United States 
government as a Revolutionary soldier. He died, May 19, 1839. at the age 
of eighty years. His wife, who survi\-ed him, died at Berlin, April 6, 1841, 
aged eighty-two years. 

In company with Colonel Israel O. Dewey, U. S. A., the writer visited 
old Hanover in 1877. We were the guests of Deacon Isaac Fellows, a vigor- 
ous octogenarian who had known Edmund Otis Hovey from boyhood, and 
promptly answered our inquiries, always speaking of him as "Otis." He 
said : "Otis was active, of good habits and a diligent scholar, very manly, 
and highly courteous." "Had he no faults?" asked Col. Dewey. The 
Deacon's eyes twinkled as if at some droll recollection. 

"Otis had a vein of humor," said he. "A big snow-ball once came down 
on his teacher's head as the latter was leaving the old red schoolhouse ; and as 
no other lad was in sight, Otis was accused of having hit the master. He 
denied the charge, but explained that he threw the ball into the air and the 
force of gravity drew it down on the teacher's head. This reply started a 
discussion as to whether the boy had prevaricated or only given an extremely 
exact statement of facts. That same school-master had a way of punishing 
boys by slinging them over his shoulder and letting them hang head-down- 



.MdXTCOMKKV COIXTV, INDIANA. 85! 

wards. Pie tried tliis one day on Otis, but the struggle ensuing was sueh 
that he never tried it again. The boy was too much for the man." 

The ruts of an old cart-road led from the "Parade" to the red clover 
patch where once stood the smithy. A few gnarled apple trees were all that 
remained of the "choice orchard" that once surrounded the Hovey home. 
Moose Mountain loomed up not far away ; and more remotely were discerned 
the blue Thetford hills, to which the family removed when the subject of this 
article was about twelve years old. The lad remained, however, for a while 
at Hanover as the pupil and guest of his uncle Jonathan Freeman. After- 
wards he went to the Thetford school, his teacher being a Mr. Hubbard. 
Much reading was done in the long winter evenings, by the light of the blaz- 
ing fire or of dip candles economically used. Among works thus early per- 
used were Rollins' Ancient History, the Works of Flavins Josephus, Bruce's 
Travel's, Cook's Voyages, Young's Night Thoughts, Milton's Paradise Lost, 
the biographies of Washington and Franklin, and for light reading Addison's 
"Spectator" in sixteen volumes. There was decided piety in the home of 
Roger Hovey. The boys took turns at family prayers, and the children were 
all drilled in the Shorter Catechism. Six days were given to farm-work, 
shop-work, in-door duties and the duties of the school-room ; and then came 
a sweet, quiet, unbroken Sabbath. When seventeen years of age Edmund 
became an eager reader of "The American Journal of Science and .Art." from 
which he got the impulse that led to his career as a scientist. 

When eighteen years old Edmund went to the Thetford .\cademv, of 
which the Rev. John Fitch was principal. He earned the nionev to pav his 
tuition by teaching during his vacations at Thetford and Norwich. He 
joined the Thetford Congregational church in 1821, of which Dr. Asa Burton 
was pastor, with Rev. Charles White as colleague, who became at a later 
period the second president of Wabash College. Young Hovey's zeal and 
various talents induced the church to adopt him as a beneficiary with the 
ministry in view. The members "boarded him around'' and paid for his text- 
books: and the ladies "cent society" undertook to clothe him. His uncle Otis 
gave him a calf which was sold and the monev applied for tuition. Mean- 
while, as we regret to say, Roger Hovey objected to all this. He offered to 
give him the home and the farm if he would relinquish his plans and care for 
his parents in their declining years. Finally, as an older son accepted this 
parental offer, the father said to his younger son. "Well, Edmund. I will give 
you your freedom," meaning his time till he was twenty-one years of age ; 
the mother slipped ten dollars into his hand, and at last the way was clear for 
him to gain a liberal education. 



852 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Now came a new trial. So ardently did Edmund enter on his prepara- 
tory studies that his health gave way and the church discontinued its aid. 
His physician, Dr. Kendrick, advised a journey on horseback, generously add- 
ing, "Do not spare money if you can regain your health." He went to Sara- 
toga, and thence to Sandwich on Cape Cod, where he was the guest and 
patient of his uncle, Dr. Nathaniel Freeman, who had been a member of 
the Continental Congress, a brigadier-general in the Revolutionary Army, 
and was a competent guide to various localities of historic interest. Health 
and vigor thus regained Edmund resumed his preparatory studies, being aided 
financially by Judge Joseph Reed and others. 

In the spring of 1825, Mr. Hovej^ entered as freshman at Dartmouth 
College, and wrote to his parents formally announcing it to be thencefor- 
ward "the great object of life to benefit mankind." He was graduated with 
honor, in 1828, being a Phi Beta Kappa man, in a class of forty-one, more 
than half of whom entered the Gospel ministry. His theological studies 
were pursued at Andover Seminary, where he mainly supported himself by 
his skill as carpenter and blacksmith; also doing mission work during vaca- 
tions in Vermont and Canada. Many of his college classmates were with 
him at Andover; but the most intimate friend of them all, Caleb Mills, de- 
ferred entering the Seminary two years in order to take a Sabbath-school 
agency at the West, thus being graduated from Andover in 1833, while 
Hovey was graduated in 1831, and was licensed to preach November 27, 
1830. 

On a frosty Monday morning, September 26, 1831, six young men 
walked from Andover to East Bradford, where, in what is now known as the 
Groveland church, they were ordained as home missionaries, by the Presby- 
tery of Newburyport, "to go into the Western country," namely: Daniel 
Cole Blood, Asaph Boutelle, Nathaniel Smith Folsom. Edmund Otis Hovey, 
Benjamin Labaree and Jason Chapin. Dr. Gardiner B. Perry presided and 
made the consecrating prayer ; the sermon was by Rev. Mr. Storrs ; the charge 
was by Dr. Daniel Dana ; and the right hand of fellowship was given by Rev. 
Mr. Phelps. 

The plans of "The Western Band" were sadly broken into by the sudden 
death of Dr. Cushman, general agent for the West. Medical men told them 
that they and their wives would sink under the climate in a year. A man 
who had gone five hundred miles on horseback in Indiana reported its main 
features to be "bad roads and fever and ague." On the other hand, Boutelle, 
who went among the Ojibways, wrote back that it was "no farther from 



MOXTGOMERV COUNTY, INDIANA. 853 

Minnesota to Heaven than from dear old Andover." Tliere are indications 
that it was Mr. Hovey's original intention to go as chaplain to Fort Brady on 
the Saulte Ste. Marie; although Indiana was also seriously tliought of. He 
was in suspense. 

In college days a classmate, Horace E. Carter, was ill with typhoid fever 
and died in ten days. Mr. Hovey took constant care of him, and then was 
too sick to accompany the remains to Peacham, Vermont, where Mr. Carter 
had lived and was buried. After the funeral, Mr. Carter's widowed mother, 
accompanied by her daughters Martha and Mary, visited the friend who had 
so tenderly cared for their deceased relative. The next year, Mr. Hovey had 
a tract agency in Caledonia county, in which Peacham was located, and found 
an opportunity to ask Mary Carter to share his fortunes. Her father had 
been the principal of the Caledonia County Grammar School, and she herself 
was admirably educated. She accepted the young minister's hand. And 
when later he wrote saying that he had a pastoral call to Hartford, which 
place he described as "a pleasant town on the banks of the Connecticut, and 
quite different from the log huts of Indiana." the young lady replied, "I am 
reading Flint's Mississippi Valley: do not let Hartford turn your mind from 
the path of duty." An interview with Dr. Absalom Peters decided him to 
devote himself to the work of a home missionary, and he wrote on his 
thirtieth birthday asking Miss Carter to prepare "for work in the wilderness 
of Indiana." On the 5th of October. 1831. they were joined in marriage 
by Dr. Leonard ^^'orcester, and as soon as the farewells were spoken they 
started on their westward journey. 

Mr. Hovey's commission appointed him to "publish the Gospel in l^'ort 
Wayne, or such other place or places as shall lie fixed on." with four hun- 
dred dollars as a salary, and seventy dollars as an outfit. According to the 
diary of the missionary, "Railroads were as yet only a subject of contempla- 
tion." He and his bride went down Lake Champlain by steamboat, by canal 
to Troy and thence to Buffalo : and, after a day at Niagara Falls, the "Henry 
Clay" carried them to Detroit in three days, where they were met by Rev. 
Noah Wells and Rev. Jeremiah Porter. After a brief conference it was 
decided that Mr. Porter should go to Fort Brady, whence two years later he 
was transferred to Fort Dearborn and became the founder of the first church 
in Chicago. During a delay of three weeks at Detroit, at that time a village of 
3,500 inhabitants. Mr. Hovey improved the time by starting the first temper- 
ance society ever formed in the bounds of Michigan, and in interesting Hon. 
Lewis Cass in its success. Cass was a New Hampshire man, at that time 



854 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Governor of the territory, and the same year made Secretaiy of War under 
Jackson, where he exempHfied his temperance sentiments by abolishing grog 
from the army. Forwarding their baggage with a lot of goods consigned to 
Judge Hanna of Fort Wayne, the missionary and his bride went by the 
steamer "Gratiot" to Perrysburg — Toledo being as yet unknown. 

After a brief sojourn at a village of Pottawatomies they drove by ox- 
cart through an almost unbroken forest to the Maumee rapids, whence they 
were poled by pirogue up to Fort Wayne, where they met a hearty welcome 
from Judge Hanna. The Fort Wayne church however was supplied, and the 
Judge remarked : "There is a right smart little town of three hundred in- 
habitants started at the foot of Lake Michigan. They call it 'Chicago' ; bet- 
ter go there." Instead of doing so they went by canoe down the Wabash 
to Logansport, where they were met by Rev. Messrs. Martin M. Post and 
James A. Carnahan. Leaving Mrs. Hovey for a while at Logansport, Messrs. 
Hovey and Carnahan took to their canoe again and floated down the Wabash 
to Lafayette, where Mr. Hovey had the joy of preaching his first sermon in 
Indiana. Part of the time on horseback they "rode and tied." 

Fountain county, which was decided on as Mr. Hovey's chosen field of 
labor, had then ten thousand inhabitants, but no meeting-house, schoolhouse 
or newspaper. A church organization at Portland had been abandoned ; but 
one was ready to be formed at Covington, of which the missionary took 
charge, and also of one just formed at Coal Creek. New churches were 
started at Rob Roy and Newtown. Midway between the two stood the log 
cabin into which the pioneer couple moved, exactly twelve weeks after bidding 
adieu to Squire Carter's mansion at Peacham, Vermont. The cabin walls 
were "chinked and daubed": its one room had a "puncheon" floor; its one 
window had twelve small panes in the space made by simply removing a log; 
a loft served for storage; the wide door swung on wooden hinges, and its 
latch-string was out by day for hospitality, and pulled in by night for secur- 
ity. In a log stable near by was kept "Barney" a reformed race-horse, who 
carried his new owner over two thousand miles on errands of mercy and 
righteousness through Fountain county, occasionally running away, but never 
letting his master miss an appointment in two years. 

Mr. Hovey felt the responsibility of being the only minister in the 
county. He gathered churches and Sunday schools, started day schools and 
temperance societies, scattered good literature abroad, and promoted the first 
newspaper started in the county seat. He held camp-meetings with good 
results. The Wabash Presbytery was formed, covering sixteen counties. 



MOXTGOMF.RV COL'XTV. INDIANA. X55 

whose four ministers and eight elders met on one occasion at the Hovey 
cabin and lodged at night on its straw-strewn floor. ' A college classmate. 
Rev. Caleb Mills, was urged to come West as his associate. Mills reply, 
dated June 14, 1832, was highly characteristic, but when he finally did come, 
the next year, the hand of Providence had opened for both men a wider edu- 
cational field to which they ga\e their lives, and which was located in Mont- 
gomery county. 

Several men who had been revolving the idea of founding a literary 
institution of high order for the Wabash valley, met at the "Old Brick House" 
at Crawfordsville, on November 21, 1832. Rev. John M. Ellis, secretary of 
the Indiana Education Society, presided; Rev. Edmund Otis Hovey was the 
secretary; Rev. James Thomson stated the object of the meeting; Rev. John 
Thomson and Rev. James A. Carnahan were al.so present; and elders Gilli- 
land, Robinson, McConnell and King. A public meeting of citizens was held 
that night. The next da\- the founders inspected and accepted grounds 
generously donated by Hon. Williamson Dunn. A light snow having fallen, 
those men of faith knelt on its spotless surface amid the virgin forest and 
dedicated the spot to the Triune God, being led in prayer by Mr. Ellis. 

We are not giving a history of the college, except as touching the career 
of Mr. Hovey, who from that day till the day of his death was identified 
with it in various ways. His name headed the list of clerical trustees and 
remained there for forty-five years. He was on the charter committee and 
the building committee, and was the man designated to secure the services 
of Caleb Mills as first instructor. The original suggestion was to found "a 
classical and English high school, rising into a college." The charter name, 
however, was "The Wabash Manual Labor College and Teachers" Seminary''; 
wisely shortened at a later day to its simpler form of "Wabash College." 

After a brief period Mr. Hovey bade his parishioners in Fountain county 
farewell, took an appointment as financial agent for the college, embarked 
with his wife and infant son at Covington, descended the Wabash to its 
mouth, and then went up the Ohio to Louisville, Cincinnati and Pittsburgh. 
Few encouraged him. Dr. Lyman Beecher "frowned on the infant weakling 
of a college." Swarms of agents were ahead of him at the Presbyterian 
General Assembly in Philadelphia and the "May anniversaries" in New York. 
Efforts at Baltimore, Boston, Providence and New Haven were fruitless. 

A memorable crisis found Mr. Hovey at the Tontine Hotel in New 
Haven, "with an empty purse and no hope and every door closed." He 
wrote to Crawfordsville, resigning all connection with the college, saying that 



856 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

he should return to his mission field in Fountain county as soon as he got 
money enough to do so. He signed this affecting letter, "Yours at the point 
of desperation." Concerning it President Tuttle has impressively remarked : 
"If that letter had been sent, the college would have perished. It was not 
sent and the college lived." 

It is due to the memory of Rev. John M. Ellis to relate the fact that he 
happened in on the discouraged agent just at this time, and made the wise 
suggestion that, before mailing his letter, he should confer with the faculty 
of Yale College. President Woolsey has described the interview. The early 
struggles of Yale were rehearsed and words of encouragement were spoken. 
Then followed an interview with the faculty of Andover Seminary, who ad- 
vised an appeal to the rural churches of New England. A circular was 
printed on behalf of "a region equal to Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode 
Island, where the first settlements had been made only twelve years previ- 
ously, yet where there was now a population of one hundred thousand." 

The plan was effective. The first response was from Amesbury Mills, 
being fifty dollars. Then from Newburyport came four hundred and twenty- 
five dollars. Other New England towns gave several thousand dollars in all, 
and the crisis was safely past. 

The task of finding a president was even harder than trying to raise 
money. Dr. Absalom Peters suggested the name of Dr. Elihu W. Baldwin, 
the most popular pastor in New York City. Bravely the Hoosier agent met 
the eminent clergyman, saying, "The King's business requires haste. I ask 
you to be the president of Wabash College." A map of Indiana was spread 
out, and the claims of the new common\vealth were urged till finally consent 
was gained, followed by a unanimous election. Thus encouraged the financial 
problem was successfully solved. 

The fact may here be stated that, after Dr. Baldwin's death in 1840, 
Mr. Hovey was again deputed to secure the services of Dr. Charles White, 
of Owego, New York; and after Dr. White's death, twenty years later, he 
went on a like errand for Dr. J. F. Tuttle, of New Jersey. Some of the other 
members of the faculty were gained by his instrumentality. From the first 
the trustees urged Mr. Hovey himself to take a professorship. In 1834 they 
offered him the chair of the Natural Sciencfes, and Mr. Ellis urged it on him, 
saying "your standing in Indiana, your acquaintance with the business con- 
cerns of the institution, your familiarity with the minutiae of all its parts at 
home and abroad, as well as your personal endowments, all render you em- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. S^J 

phatically the man." Di.strusting his gifts, Mr. Ho\ey at first took the chair 
of Rhetoric; but in 1836 was led to become the professor of Chemistry, 
Geology and Mineralogy. This department was divided in 1871, leaving 
Geology alone to him for the rest of his days. A pioneer college man must 
do whatever has to be done; from mending a gate to teaching astronomy. 
Mr. Hovey was accustomed to say, in his old age, that he had taught every- 
thing in the curriculum except the differential and integral calculus. 

From 1833 to 1839 he was the college librarian, during which period he 
collected and catalogued several thousand volumes. His services as treasurer 
covered twenty-six years, enabling him to turn over to his successor, Alex- 
ander Thomson, Esq., the sum of one hundred thousand dollars. He per- 
sonally superintended the erection of the first frame building, now known as 
Forest Hall ; the original brick building, styled South Hall ; the main building, 
known as Center Hall; and, with General Carrington. the .\rmur\-. since 
turned into the Hovey Museum, and now used as a gymnasium. His early 
knowledge of fanning enabled him to aid the agricultural experiments under- 
taken during the "manual labor" period. Together with President White 
he mustered the boys for tree-planting so that a younger growth of elms, 
maples and beeches might replace the monarchs of the primeval forest as the 
latter fell to decay. At his suggestion the first college band was formed, 
under the leadership of Philyer L. Wells ; and he himself selected, at the 
house of Firth, Hall & Pond, in New York city, the Imgle, horns, trombones, 
flutes, clarinets, drums, etc., that were stored in his attic during long vaca- 
tions. 

When the first site of fifteen acres was deemed unsuitaljle Mr. Hovey, 
acting for the trustees, bought for six thousand dollars a quarter section from 
Major Whitlock and sold a hundred acres of it at auction for nine thousand 
dollars, keeping the remainder as a college reserve. Payment was in "wild- 
cat" bills, which the hard-money Major refused to accept. Then Mr. Hovey 
went to Cincinnati, exchanged the bills for specie, took the silver dollars 
home, by mud-wagon from Indianapolis, in six square boxes, each containing 
one thousand dollars ; had Tom Kelly, a tenant of the college, carry them in 
a wheelbarrow to Major Whitlock, who counted them, dollar by dollar, and 
then gave his receipt for the sum. 

On one of the lots of the "college reserve" the Hovey house was built 
in 1837, space for it being cleared from the virgin forest. A number of the 
big trees were allowed to stand, around some of which wild grapevines 
twined fantastically burdened with many clusters. This property remained 



858 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

for sixty years in the hands of the family, and was finally sold as an elegible 
site for a presidential mansion, the original dwelling being removed to a place 
near the gymnasium to be used by the curator of the college campus. 

One night the five year old son of Mr. Hovey awoke his father with the 
strange cry, "Papa, why does God let Wabash College burn up?" 

In Professor Hovey's diary the following record occurs, for the 23rd 
of September, 1838 : "About two o'clock this morning the cry of 'Fire, the 
College is on fire' was heard, and by half past two the whole roof and fourth 
story of our beautiful building was in a complete blaze." Only eight rooms 
were saved ; but the library and philosophical apparatus were destroyed. That 
calamity was on Saturday, and on Monday rooms were rented in Hanna's 
Building, and by Tuesday recitations were resumed, only a single student hav- 
ing left by reason of the conflagration. The generous men of Crawfords- 
ville rallied to the rescue, saying, "Rebuild and we will help." The friends 
of President Baldwin in New York urged him to resume his pastorate in 
that city, but he nobly said: "I will not give up Wabash College; there is 
only the more work to be done." 

Among the new- friends raised up for Wabash College in its time of need 
should be mentioned Mr. and Mrs. Israel Williams, who were inmates of 
Mr. Hovey's family in 1840-41, with their daughter, who afterward became 
Mrs. S. S. Thomson. Mr. Williams endowed the professorship bearing his 
name, and he induced his brother-in-law, Mr. Chauncey Rose, of Terre 
Haute, to endow the Rose professorship of Geology, whereof Mr. Hovey 
was the first incumbent. Through the hands of the latter Mr. Rose passed a 
sum total of eighty thousand dollars for benevolent purposes, though not all 
this sum was for the college. One day, when putting into his hands fifty 
thousand dollars he playfully said, "Here Mr. Hovey are two thousand dol- 
lars more as your commission and for your own use." 

The Lord had already guided more than one benefactor to the treasur- 
er's cottage. There one evening the prudential committee knelt in prayer 
because debts were due and the treasury empty. A knock at the door brought 
to them Mr. Jesse J. Brown, of New Albany, with an offering^ in cash that 
exactly met their need. An incident comes to mind when at another crisis, 
Mr. Hovey had been pleading in vain in Brooklyn, till footsore and heartsore 
he dropped in to the weekly prayer-meeting of the Plymouth church and 
meekly took a back seat. The topic was "Cheerfulness," and after the open- 
ing remarks he took occasion to thank the pastor and people for past gener- 
osity to the college of which Mr. Beecher had long been a trustee. "Come 



MONTGOMERY COUXTV. INDIANA. ><^q 

to the platform," said Beecher. The final result of the appeal that followed 
was a gift of ten thousand dollars to found the Beecher professorship. 

The hospitality of the Hovey home was abundant. A dozen nephews 
and nieces were treated like sons and daughters. Several orphans were prac- 
tically adopted, one of whom afterward was the wife of Professor D. A. 
Bassett. The house was full of student-boarders, not for gain, but by par- 
ental urging. Some of them distinguished themselves in public life. All 
were required by domestic rules to bow daily at the family altar where prayer 
was wont to be made. 

The humble nucleus of the college cabinet was a lot of ores and crystals 
brought by Mrs. Hovey from Vermont, augmented by tropical shells donated 
by Mrs. Baldwin, and specimens purchased from Prof. S. Harrison Thomson, 
in 1841. One day the little son of Prof. Hovey brought to his father what 
looked like a petrified toad, but which the wiser father identified as a crinoid — 
the first found of all the many thousand Crawfordsville crinoids that have 
enriched the museums of this and foreign lands. Corey's Blufif, the best 
known of the crinoid banks, yet remains in the possession of the family. In 
1874, aided by his son and daughter. Dr. Hovey made out a numbered cata- 
logue of ten thousand specimens for reference, with a written statement that 
there were in all some twenty-five thousand objects of natural history in the 
college cabinet. This included several hundred minerals, fossils and shells, 
and over two thousand botanical specimens indigenous to the region, that had 
been a memorial gift from his son. The varied cares of a busy professional 
life left this pioneer geologist scant time for describing or classifying the pro- 
fusion of fossiliferous riches by which he was embarrassed. A volume might 
be filled with his correspondence about them with such men as Silliman, Dana, 
Shepherd, Newberry, James Hall, Cox, Collett, and other scientists. Oc- 
casional articles from his pen found their way to the newspapers and maga- 
zines ; but he had little time for the joys of authorship. A few of his sermons 
were published, and but few were left in manuscript, though he frequently 
occupied the pulpit, always being heard with attention by his intelligent 
hearers. It may be said that his sermonic appeals, like his own type of piety, 
were more intellectual than emotional. At its centennial celebration Dart- 
mouth College honored him with the degree of Doctor of Divinity. His 
friends felt that it was merited. 

Dr. Hovey passed away after a short illness on the loth of March, 1877. 
Mrs. Hovey survived him for several years, ending her useful life July 12, 
1886, amid the familiar surroundings of the old home. 



860 MONTGOMERY COUNTY,, INDIANA. 

Two children were born to them. One of these, Horace Carter Hovey, 
was born in Fountain county, January 28, 1833 ; and a sketch of his career ap- 
pears elsewhere in this volume. Miss Mary Freeman Hovey, the daughter of 
Professor Hovey, was born at Crawfordsville, September 28, 1838, where she 
died June 4, 1897. She was a graduate of the Ohio Female College ; for several 
years was a professor in the Kansas Agricultural College; taught for three or 
four years in the public schools in New Haven, Connecticut, but was best 
known by her faithful work as a teacher of young ladies, in her home at Craw- 
fordsville, where, first and last she had under her care more than two hundred 
and fifty pupils. There are now living three grandchildren of Professor 
Hovey, one of them a namesake on whom his mantle has fallen, namely, Ed- 
mund Otis Hovey, Ph. D., a graduate of Yale University, and for the last 
twenty years a curator of Geology and Paleontology in the American Mu- 
seum of Natural History in New York City. 

In the front wall of Center church, in Crawfordsville, a memorial win- 
dow has been placed in honor of Professor Hovey; and a granite monument 
marks his resting-place in the beautiful Oak Hill cemetery. But his most en- 
during monument is found in the noble work he did for religion and educa- 
tion. Montgomery county never had a more public-spirited citizen, though 
he never sought or held office outside the college and the church. This sketch 
of his career may be fittingly closed by condensing the just tribute paid to 
him in the funeral discourse preached over his remains by the late President 
Tuttle : 

"Honored by his Alma Mater with her highest degree; honored as a 
preacher of the Word by his brethren in the ministry ; honored by the com- 
munity as an old Roman of the noblest type ; honored by the church which he 
helped to found, and in which for thirty-eight years he was a pillar ; honored 
as a founder, a trustee and a professor of Wabash College; honored with 
many other great trusts, all who knew him were witnesses that the consum- 
mate formula describing his life among men wa«: 'Faithful in the Lord.' 
His last years were singularly beautiful ; as when maples in autumn are cov- 
ered with dying leaves they are also lit up by supernal beauty. He moved 
among us tender, simple and loving as a child, trusting and joyful as a saint, 
fond of earth and most tenderly held by its ties, yet with lifted eye and shining 
face, and his head wearing the crown of glory which the loving God had given 
him." 

The privileged by-standers heard his expiring cry voice his ruling passion, 
"God bless Wabash College," after which simply came the parting prayer, 
"Lord Jesus, receive my spirit." 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INniANA. 86l 



DAMD CHARLES SAIITH. 



Few can draw rules for their own guidance from the pages of Plutarch, 
but all are benefited by the delineation of those traits of character which 
find scope and exercise in the common walks of life. The unostentatious 
routine of private life, although in the aggregate more important for the 
welfare of the community than any meteoric public career, cannot, from its 
very nature, figure in the public annals, though each locality's history should 
contain the names of those individuals who contribute to the' success of the 
material affairs of a community and tn its public stability: men who lead 
wholesome and exemplar)' Ii\es which might be profitably studied by the on- 
coming generation. In such class must consistently appear the name of 
David Charles Smith, well known and progressive business man of Craw- 
fordsville, and one of Montgomery county's most representative citizens, a 
man who leads a plain, industrious life, endeavoring to deal honestly with 
his fellow men and contribute somewhat to the general public good in an 
unobtrusive manner, for being a man who thinks along progressive lines, he 
naturally desires to see his community advance along material and civic lines, 
and, although a very busy man, he has never neglected his duty as a citi- 
zen, but has been one of the men who could be relied upon in the promul- 
gation of such enterprises as make for the general good. 

Mr. Smith was born on October .22, 1843, i" Perrysville, Indiana, and 
he is a son of John Frederick and Lydia Ann (Watt) Smith. The father 
was born in Frederick county, Virginia, in September, 18 12, and was a son 
of David and Susan (Hunsicker) Smith. David Smith was a native of 
Virginia and there he continued to reside until 1832, when he made the 
journey to Indiana on horseback, and here bought a farm and returned home, 
bringing his family here in the fall of 1833, making this trip in wagons, 
which required some time, owing to the fact that the only roads in many 
places were unbroken trails, and it was exceedingly rough going all the way. 
Upon reaching Brownsburg, Mr. Smith was compelled to leave his wife and 
one daughter, in order to have horses enough to draw the wagons on to 
where he desired to settle. John F. Smith, the oldest son, drove the six- 
horse team. The place where they located was on a farm two and one-half 
miles south of Penysville, and there, by hard work a good farm was de- 
veloped from the wilderness and a comfortable home established, and there 
David Smith and wife spent the rest of their lives. 

John F. Smith spent his boyhood days in Virginia, where he received a 



862 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

good, common school education, and among other things he learned survey- 
ing, and after coming to Indiana he followed this vocation in the summer 
and taught school in the winter, continuing thus for two years, then estab- 
lished a general store at Perrysville, which he conducted with great success 
for a period of about thirty-three years, enjoying an extensive trade with 
the people of that section for miles around. During this time he was also 
interested in the milling business, and he shipped large quantities of grain 
to New Orleans in flat-boats, Mr. Smith often going along on the boat and 
returning on horseback. He also sold agricultural implements for many 
years, and was a general business man, very successful in whatever he turned 
his attention to and one of the leading citizens of Perrysville in every respect. 
That town in those days was a great shipping poirit. Our subject has seen 
as many as five boats unloading there simultaneously. Hogs in large num- 
bers were also butchered there and shipped to New Orleans, finding a ready 
market there. These various lines of business Mr. Smith carried on until 
1885, when, having accumulated a competency, he retired. His death oc- 
curred in 1892, after a very active, successful, noble and praiseworthy life. 
He was one of the best known and most highly esteemed citizens of his 
county. Politically, he was a Whig and later a Republican, and in religious 
matters a Methodist. 

'His wife, Lydia Ann Watt, was a native of Circleville, Ohio, who came 
to Perrysville, Indiana, in 1834 with her parents, and here she and John F. 
Smith were married in 1835. She lived to a ripe old age, dying in 1894. 
She was a daughter of John and Judith Watt, both natives of Pennsj'lvania, 
from which state they came to Ohio and later to Indiana, and here they 
spent the rest of their lives, living to very advanced ages. 

David C. Smith, of this review, received a good common school edu- 
cation, and before he could launch out on a business career the Civil war 
came on and he offered his services to his country, enlisting on July 22, 1862, 
in Company K, Seventy-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which regiment was 
afterwards known as the Sixth Indiana Cavalry. He served three years 
with much gallantry and credit, participating in a number of important 
campaigns and battles, and on August 6, 1864, the Confederates took him 
prisoner and sent him to Andersonville. He was captured near Gainesville, 
Georgia, while trying to get back from the Stoneman raid. Previous to 
that, when the regiment had only been in sendee twelve days, he was en- 
gaged at Richmond, Kentucky, where over half the regiment was captured 
and paroled. For some time he did scout duty in Knoxville, Tennessee, 
Kentucky, at Resacca, Cassville and Adairsville. He was in the Atlanta 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. SCtT, 

campaign, and he was captured just before the fall of the city of Atlanta. 
Mr. Smith says words are inadequate in describing the horrors of Ander- 
sonville prison. There were thirty-three thousand of the Union men there 
at one time. He was released on April 29, 1865. He has also been in prison 
in Savannah, Millen, Blackshear, and Thomasville. He was honorably dis- 
charged from the Federal service on June 28, 1865. 

After his career in the army he returned to Indiana and, desiring to 
complete his education, he entered Asbury (now DePauw) University, at 
Greencastle, where he remained one term, then went to Poughkeepsie, New 
York, and took a business course. He went to Minnesota in 1867 and there 
s])ent one winter, during which he canvassed the city of Minneapolis for a 
directorv, then returned to Perrysville, Indiana, and took his father's place 
in the store, continuing to engage in general merchandising until 1883, or 
for a period of sixteen years, during which time he enjoyed an extensive trade 
and got a good start in life. Then lie came to Crawfordsville and engaged 
in the lumber business, purchasing a half interest in a lumber yard with J. 
W. Stroh, which they conducted for two years, when Mr. Smith bought out 
his partner, then engaged in business for himself until 1888, when the firm 
of Smith & Duckworth was started, which has continued with uninter- 
rupted success. They enjoy a very extensive trade with the surrounding 
country and carry a large and well selected stock. Our subject has become 
one of the financially strong men of his town and county, and is deserving 
of much credit for what he has accomplished, having started at the bottom 
of the ladder. He is now advanced in years, but, having been a man of 
good habits, he is hale and hearty. He is a man who is popular with the 
people owing to his honesty, obliging nature and unfailing courtesy. He is 
a member of McPherson Post, Grand Army of the Republic, at Crawfords- 
ville. He belongs to the Masonic Order, and religiously, is a Presbyterian. 
Mr. Smith has done more work for the L. L. Culver Union Hospital in 
Crawfordsville than any other man. 

On July 2, 1868, Mr. Smith was married to Caroline Sidney Evans, 
who was born in Fountain county, Indiana, November 13, 1841, and grew 
to womanhood and received her education in Indiana. Her parents were 
early settlers in that county and were well known there. She is the niece of 
General Evans, for whom Evansville was named. Her father, Jefferson 
Evans, was a prominent attorney and legislator. 

Two children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, namely : Anna 
Mary, who is the wife of Frank P. McNutt, of Crawfordsville, and Agnes 
Neely, wife of Francis S. Cobb, of Boston, Massachusetts. 



864 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

REV. HORACE CARTER HOVEY, D. D. 

Horace Carter Hovey, son of Professor Edmund Otis Hovey, D. D., 
and Mary Carter Hovey, was born near Rob Roy, Indiana, January 28, 1833. 
They moved to Crawfordsville in 1835 and for two years lived in the "Old 
Brick House," till, in 1837, they built the dwelling on a lot of the "College 
Reserve," which remained in the family till 1898, when sold for the site of 
a presidential residence. Among Mr. Hoveys earliest recollections are the 
felling of the great trees and the raising of the frame-house. He was baptized 
by Father John Thomson and joined the Center church, March 30, 1845. 
When only twelve years old he took a class in Sunday school which he kept 
for seven years, being absent only six times in that period. When sixteen 
years old he was chosen to lead the chorus choir, in w;,hich he had previously 
been a singer and flute-player. He was a member of the college band, and 
has kept up his fiute-playing all his life. He belonged to the Euphronean 
society and the Lyceum, and was an honorary member of the Calliopean 
society. Subsequent to graduation he was made a member, and for three 
years the vice-president of the Phi Beta Kappa society, which he was ap- 
pointed to represent at the Ninth Triennial Council of the United Chapters at 
Williamsburg, Virginia, in 1907. For about two years after graduating with 
the degree of A. B., in 1853, he was tutor in the preparatory department of 
Wabash College; and he served one summer as Sunday school missionary in 
Fountain county, where he organized twenty schools, and devised a system of 
Sunday school mapping that has been since adopted generally. In 1857 ^^ 
was graduated from Lane Theological Seminary, at Cincinnati; where he 
mainly supported himself by teaching music in the public schools. He also 
led a chorus choir, mornings and evenings, in the Eighth (now the Third) 
Presbyterian church, and sang in a quartette choir afternoons in a church of. 
which Dr. H. M. Storrs was pastor. In the former church he preached his 
first sermon, November 20, 1856, on "Church Music," which was afterwards 
published in the Christian Herald. He was licensed by the Presbytery of 
Crawfordsville, July 11, 1857, and ordained by the Presbytery of Madison, 
April 16. 1858, his father preaching the sermon on the occasion. He served 
as home missionary at North Madison, Bryansburg and Vevay, and for a 
year as secretary of the American and Foreign Christian Union. While 
considering a call to the Presbyterian church at Coldwater, Michigan, the Civil 
War began. His sermons in that city on the National Fast-Day (January 4, 
1861), and on the firing on Sumpter, in April, caused such agitation that the 




.::Vo 



. %,,„ „ : ■//,',./,„,,.,/,.'■ /■', ■ -y,->'.>.'-/-^- /'t'^/' 



MnXTdOMKRV cni-XTV. ixniANA. M15 

pastoral call was declined, and Mr. Hovey accepted a call to the Florence 
church in Northampton, Massachusetts, where he stayed four years. While 
there he served twice as delegate of the United States Christian Commission, 
during "battlefield duty" during his first term, at the Wilderness, North Anna 
and Cold Harbor; and in the second term, after six weeks work in camps and 
hospitals at Washington, D. C, he went to Richmond, just after its surrender, 
and had the task of superintending the feeding of the starving people. His 
other pastorates were: Second Presbyterian church in New Albany, Indiana 
(1866-1869); Fulton Street Presbyterian Church, Peoria, Illinois (1869- 
1873); First Presbyterian Church, Kansas City, Missouri (1873-1875): Pil- 
grim Congregational, New Haven, Connecticut (1876-1883); Park Avenue 
Congregational, Minneapolis, Minnesota (1883-1887); Park Street Congre- 
gational, Bridgeport, Connecticut (1887-1891); South Congregational Mid- 
dletown, Connecticut, as supply (1892); and First Presbyterian church in 
Newburyport, Massachusetts (1893- 1909). 

Dr. Hovey's ministerial labors have been rewarded by large accessions 
to the churches to which he has ministered, especially at New Albany, New 
Haven, Minneapolis and Bridgeport, in each of which places there were re- 
markable revivals. He retired from active pastoral labors at the ripe age of 
seventy-five years; and since then has done occasional preaching, and con- 
siderable literary and scientific work. First and last he has made his mark 
as a lecturer on popular and scientific subjects, having filled engagements in 
many of the principal cities in the United States and Canada, and at numer- 
ous Chautauqua assemblies, as well as with colleges and seminaries. He re- 
ceived the degree of Master of Arts from Wabash College in 1857. Twice 
he has been honored with the degree of Doctor of Divinity, from Gale College 
(Wisconsin) in 1883, and from Wabash College in 1907. He is a fellow of 
the American Association for the Advancement of Science ; a member of the 
Geological Society of America, of the National Geographic Society, of the 
International Geological Congress, of La Societe de SpcMeologie (France), 
and a charter memljer of the Connecticut Sons of the Amreican Revolution. 
He has been for fourteen years the president of the Merrimack Bible Society, 
and of the Daniel Hovey Association for nearly as long a period. He has 
also held numerous oflices in the ecclesiastical bodies with whicli he has been 
identified. 

From boyhood Dr. Hovey has been interested in scientific matters. When 
but nine years old he found the first of the myriads of "Cravvfordsxille Crin- 
oids" that have enriched the museums of this and other lands, and for many 
(55) 



866 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

years he owned the most noted of the Crinoid banks, known as Corey's Bluff. 
In 1871 he gave his cabinet to Wabash College, the gift being valued at one 
thousand dollars, and in 1887 he disposed of a collection of equal value to 
Carleton College in Minesota. In the summer of 1854 he made an indepen- 
dent geological reconnaisance of a considerable portion of Southern Indiana, 
reporting the result to the Indiana Geological Society and also sending a re- 
port to the New Orleans Academy of Science. In it he called attention to 
the now noted marble quarries, bituminous coal-fields, remarkable fossils of 
Spergen Hill, and the numerous caverns found in the Mountain Limestone. 
He explored that same year the wonderful Wyandotte Cave, of which he 
made a map, and he published his description in the Indianapolis Journal and 
the Nezu York Tribune. Since that time he has visited more than three hun- 
dred caves and grottoes and gained especial distinction by his works on 
Mammoth Cave. In 1897 he joined a party that explored numerous can- 
yons and caverns in France, and he also visited Russia with a geological party 
that year, who were guests of the Tsar. 

Dr. Hovey has been a frequent contributor to scientific and popular 
magazines, and more than a hundred articles from him have appeared in the 
Scientific American. He wrote a number of articles for the Ninth, Tenth 
and Eleventh editions of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. He is the author of 
"Celebrated American Caverns" (1882) ; "A Guide-Book to Mammoth Cave" 
(fifteen editions) ; "Mammoth Cave Illustrated" (with Dr. R. E. Call, in 
1897); "Hovey's Hand-Book of the Mammoth Cave" (1909); and a re- 
vised and enlarged edition of Hovey and Call's "Mammoth Cave Illustrated" 
(1912). He compiled in 1897 a work styled "The Origin and Annals of the 
First Presbyterian Church in Newburyport," that was published by Damrell 
& Upham, of Boston. More than thirty of his sermons, poems and addresses 
have been published in pamphlet form ; besides numerous minor contributions 
to the press. Jointly with Dr. Call he has compiled an exhaustive bioliography 
of Mammoth Cave, including 400 titles of works mainly in his own library, 
that will appear in 1913 in "Spelunca," a French periodical. 

Dr. Hovey married, at New Haven, Connecticut, November 18, 1857, 
Helen Lavinin Blatchley, daughter of Samuel Loper Blatchley, Esquire. She 
was born ;u ^ 'orth Madison, Connecticut, April 23, 1830, and is directly 
descended frr m Thomas Blatchley, who emigrated from Wales to Boston, in 
1635, removed to Hartford in 1640, to Guilford in 1666, whence he returned 
to Boston, wlipre he died. Her father went to reside in New Haven in 1846, 
where he became a well-known business man and had one of its principal 



MON'HiOMERV COUNTY. INDIANA. 867 

Streets named for him. On lier maternal side, Mrs. Hovey traces her ances- 
try back to the twelftli century. Her grandfather, Ebenezer Robinson, and 
her great-grandfather, Capt. James Robinson, were in the Revokitionary 
army. Previous to marriage she taught in the New Haven schools and also 
in Woodward and Hughes High Schools in Cincinnati. Dr. and Mrs. Hovey 
have had four children, namely, Mrs. Helen C. Ellinwood, wife of Rev. 
Henry F. Ellinwood, of Hamlet, North Carolina: Dr. Edmund Otis Hovey, 
Jr., of New York City, who is general secretary of the Geological Society of 
America, and geological curator in the American Museum of Natural His- 
tory : Samuel Blatchley Hovey, deceased ; and Mrs. Clara Hovey Raymond, 
wlio. witii her son, Horace Hovey Raymond, makes her home with her par- 
ents at Xewburyport. Dr. and Mrs. Ho\ey celebrated their golden wedding 
November i8, 1907: sliortly after which tlie following" testimonial was pub- 
licly presented : 

"The Presb\tery of Boston take pleasure in presenting you, the Reverend 
Horace C. Hovey, D. D., this testimonial, containing a brief expression of 
their esteem for vou, on having completed the jubilee of your ministry for 
Christ and His church. In doing so we wish to acknowledge the unfailing 
goodness of Almighty God. our Hea\enly Father, whose hand has sustained 
you and vour beloved wife in all your \aried life and work. We also recog- 
nize with profound gratitude the signal honor conferred upon you by His 
grace in permitting you to serve as an ambassador of Christ for the excep- 
tional period of fifty years. We most heartily congratulate you and Mrs. 
Hovey on this consummation together of fifty years' senice in the \ineyard 
of our Lord. We appreciate fully the work and worth of such a term of 
service, and realize that for the ripe scholarship which lias adorned your 
preaching, the pastoral care which has nurtured it. the irenic spirit which 
sweetened it, the consistent godly life which enforced it and the large meas- 
ure of success which has attended it, the whole Church of God, and the land 
you love are your debtors. 

Your work as a Presbyter has been characterized by loyalty to Presby- 
terian principles: your zeal for and unremitting toil in their advancement 
have been tempered with sweet reasonableness, and charity to Christians in 
other flocks. Your knowledge of Chruch Law has made you a safe councillor, 
and a leader in her courts: for all of which we tender you our most hearty 
thanks. It is the earnest prayer of our Presbytery that you and your life 
partner may be long spared to enjoy in health and peace the evening of life 
among vour family and many friends: and when the dawn of the endless 



868 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

day breaks and the shadows of this life flee away, )'ou may have an abundant 
entrance into the inheritance of the saints in light, and receive life's crowning 
benediction from Him whose name is love, in His own immortal words, 
'Well done, good and faithful servant, enter into the joy of thy Lord.' " 

Dr. Hovey, now an octogenarian, enjoys his full intellectual vigor, and 
is spending his declining days among his friends and former parishioners, at 
Newburyport, Massachusetts. Besides occasional use of his gifts as a preacher 
and a lecturer on scientific and literary topics, he has devoted his time to the 
congenial task of editing the "Hovey Book,' a volume of some 450 pages, 
with many illustrations, compiled under the auspices of the Daniel Hovey 
Association, already mentioned. This labor of love has brought him into 
delightful fellowship, personally or by correspondence, with a great number 
of kinsmen who claim descent from Daniel Hovey of Ipswich, as well as 
with many of the name abroad. Yet amid these diversified employments he 
cherishes the warmest devotion for his native state of Indiana, and retains a 
lively interest in all that concerns Montgomery county and its inhabitants, 
among whom he spent his boyhod and early manhood. 



JESSE CARL ALFRY. 

Life is pleasant to live when we know how to make the most of it. Some 
people start on their careers as if they had weights on their souls, or were 
afraid to make the necessary efifort to live up to a high standard. Others, 
by not making a proper study of the conditions of existence, or by not having 
the best of all trainers — good parents — are side tracked at the outset and 
never seem thereafter to be able to get back again on the main track. Much 
depends on the start, just as it does in a race. The horse that gets the best 
start, all other things being equal, will almost invariably win the race. So in 
the race of life; if you are properly started with suitable grooming, such as 
good educational and home training, you will lead in the race in after years 
and enjoy your existence. Such home influences were thrown around Jesse 
Carl Alfry, well known business man of Crawfords\'ille, and a representative 
of one of the leading families of Montgomery county. Both father and 
mother were people of sound principles and exemplary habits, no word of re- 
proach being heard against either of them, being re\-ered by all their many 
friends. 

Jesse C. Alfry was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, November 2, 1881, and 



.V'OVTCOMKUV COL'NTV, INDIANA. 869 

he is a son of Henry and Nancy (Drake) Alfry. In view oi the fact that a 
complete sketch of Henry Alfry occurs in another part of this volume, an 
extended notice of this distinguished business man is not deemed necessary 
here. However, brietly. he was Ixirn in Mercer county, Kentucky, Septem- 
ber 15, 1837, the son of Kentucky parents, and Mr. .\ifry spent his boyhood 
in his native state, remaining there until he was eighteen \ears of age when 
he came to Indiana and l>egan working on a farm in Ripley county, and w hile 
living there married in 1857 his first wife, Lydia A. Selman, whose death oc- 
curred in 1874, leaving three children, William F., Etta Jane and Rose. The 
following year Mr. Alfry married Nancy Drake, mother of our subject. Her 
death occurred on August 8, 1909, leaving three children, Elenore and Harry 
D., besides our subject. When the Civil war came on, Henry Alfry enlisted, 
in 1861 in the Thirty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served gallantly 
for the Union until his discharge in 1864. having participated in many im- 
portant battles. After the war he returned to Indiana and in a mndest way 
began the line of business that ultimately led to a fortune, lumbering, or more 
properly a department of lumbering, the heading business. He started this 
in the woods near Muncie, beginning making barrel staves, later made barrel 
and keg headings. He was successful in this from the start and his business 
increased with the years, having at one time five large factories, employing 
over two thousand men, in fact, he has handled millions of dollars and em- 
ployed many thousands of men, having been the undisputed leader of the iiead- 
ing business since 1857. Under his owm management he has made and ship- 
ped fully 40,000,000 sets of all kinds of circled tight laarrel heading from 
1876 to 1912, having worked up in all his years in the business fully 400,000,- 
000 feet board measure, or 16,666 carloads, or about 555 trains of thirty cars 
each, which would make a solid train 135 miles long. He has ojjerated in 
various parts of the country, moving to Indianapolis in 1880, removing to 
Crawfordsville two years later, which city has since been his home and chief 
headquarters, although he has been in the South a great deal, looking after his 
interests there. He is still active in this business, but not so extensively as 
formerly. Through his energy, honesty and close application he has ac- 
cumulated a fortune, and is one of the best known and highly esteemed men in 
Montgomery county. 

Jesse C. Alfry was educated in the schools of Crawfordsville, and was 
graduated from the Culver & Howe Military Institute in September, 1910, ' 
after which he formed a partnership with J. C. Treadwell in the Crawfords- 
ville Fruit Company, and in 19 u he purchased his ])artner's interest, and is 



870 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

doing an extensive and satisfactory business, handling fruits of all kinds, 
cigars and confectionery. 

Fraternally, Mr. Alfiy is a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. 

Mr, Alfry was married on December 23, 1909 to Beatrice Agnes Daley, a 
native of Brooklyn, New York. 



WALTER LAWRENCE HUNT. 

It is a good sign when so many residents of a county are found to 
have been born there. It indicates that they have found right at home all 
the opportunities necessary for the gratification of their ambitions in a busi- 
ness, political or social way, and it also indicates stability. One is reminded 
that "A rolling stone gathers no moss." That young man is the wisest who, 
when conditions will permit, remains in his native locality and addresses 
himself to the improvement of conditions he finds there and to his personal 
advancement along such lines as he may choose, selecting that for which he 
is best fitted by nature. One of this class is the successful and well known 
undertaker and funeral director. Walter Lawrence Hunt, of Crawfordsville, 
representative of an honored old family of Montgomery county. 

Mr. Hunt was born in Mace, this county, on November 28, 1874, and 
he is a son of Samuel F. and Jennie (Coulter) Hunt. The father was also 
a native of Montgomery county, Indiana, having first seen the light of day 
at the old Hunt homestead in Walnut township, on May 3, 1848. He was 
a son of Ephraim Hunt. Ephraim Hunt was a native of Ohio, where he 
spent his childhood and from there came in a very early day and entered 
from the government one hundred and sixty acres in ^Valnut township, 
when the famous Wabash valley was practically an unsettled wilderness. 
He worked hard developing this land and established a comfortable home, 
later moving to Mace, spending his declining years in retirement in that 
village, and there his death occurred in the seventies, an honored and well 
known pioneer. 

Samuel F. Hunt, father of our subject, grew to manhood on the home 
farm in Walnut township, where he found plenty of hard work to do when 
a boy, assisting his father with the general duties of the farm, and he re- 
ceived the usual education accorded country boys of that early period. Early 
in life he began farming for himself and soon had a good start, eventually 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 8/1 

becoming; one of the leading farmers and stock raisers of liis part of the 
county, and he continued to make these lines his chief life work until his 
retirement, in the year 1906, when he left the farm and moved to a com- 
fortable home in Crawfordsville, where he is spending his old age in quiet 
and in the midst of plenty. He is well known throughout the county and is 
respected by all who know him, for his life has been characterized by indus- 
try and honesty. Politically, he is a Democrat, but has never been especially 
active in public affairs. In religious matters, he is a member of the Metho- 
dist church. 

In the early seventies, Samuel F. Hunt married Jennie Coulter, who 
was born in Pennsylvania in 1852, from which state she came to Walnut 
township, Montgomery county, Indiana, with her parents when she was 
young. Her father purchased the land on which Ehpraim Hunt first settled, 
and here her family Ijecame \ery conifortabl)^ established and favoral)ly 
known. Mrs. Hunt received a rural school education. 

To Samuel F. Hunt and wife six children were born, namely : Minta 
is the wife of B. Coombs who is farming in southern Indiana ; William lives 
in Red Wing, Minnesota; Lena is the wife of Allen Arnold, of Crawfords- 
ville; Florence is the wife of Alvin Powers, of Ladoga; Harley lives in 
Crawfordsville; and Walter L.. uf this sketch, he being the eldest of the 
children. 

Walter L. Hunt grew to manhood on the home farm, and there made 
himself generally useful when a boy. He received a good common school 
education in his neighborhood, and he continued to work on the farm until 
1899, when he attended the Askins School of Embalming in Indianapolis, 
where he made a splendid record, graduating from the same in 1912, having 
become quite proficient in the modern methods of embalming. However, 
prior to that he had maintained an establishment and had charge of funerals, 
etc., erijoying a good business, which is now very rapidly increasing, his neat 
and modernly appointed establishment being now located at 122 North 
Washington street. 

Mr. Hunt was married on September 20, 1896, to Georgina Bowman, 
who is a native of Boone county, Indiana, her birth having occurred there 
on April 8, 1872, and there she was reared and educated. To this union 
four children have been born, namely : Ruth, who is now attending high 
school; Edith is in her seventh grade in school; Esther is doing fourth grade 
work ; and Lester, third grade in the local schools. 

Politically, Mr. Hunt is a Democrat, and in religious matters is a Bap- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



tist. He is prominent in fraternal circles, being a member of the Masonic 
Order, Knights of Pythias, Improved Order of Red Men, including the Hay- 
makers degree; the Knights of the Maccabees, the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, and the Patriotic Order Sons of America. He has passed through 
all the chairs in the last named order, also in the Knights of Pythias lodge. 



WILLIAM H. BROWN. 

The name of the late William H. Brown stands out distinctly in the list 
of enterprising and skillful farmers and successful stock raisers in Montgom- 
ery county in a past generation, for he was a man who believed in carrying 
into his every-day work progressive ideas and so far as practicable trans- 
planting the old order of things to the new ; however, he had to admit, as do 
all fair and broad-minded men, that many of the methods employed by our 
fathers and grandfathers in agricultural pursuits have never been improved 
upon. Mr. Brown was a good citizen and a splendid neighbor, hence was 
popular with all who knew him. He supported every movement that had for 
its object the general good of the community, delighting in seeing new re- 
forms enforced. He, while laboring for his own advancement, never ne- 
glected his duties to his neighbors, but was helpful, kind, obliging and be- 
lieved in the old adage that it was better to live and let live. So he was a 
good man, and his name is eminently deserving of perpetuation on the pages 
of local history. 

Mr. Brown was born on Novemlaer 8, 1S30, in Rush county, Indiana. 
He was a son of Lucius Brown and wife, who were from the state of New 
Jersey, having made the long westward journey over the mountains and 
through the vast wildernesses as early as 1828, locating in Rush county, 
Indiana, where they remained a number of years, then removed to Boone 
county, tliis state, where they spent the rest of their lives on a farm, and on 
that place our subject remained until a young man, when he went to Illinois, 
where he remained for two years, then came back to Boone county, this state. 
When twenty-one years old he came to Montgomery county, where he pur- 
chased forty acres of land, to which he later added, prospering through hard 
work and good management until he owned several fine farms totaling nearly 
six hundred acres, wliich he l>rought up to an excellent state of improvement 
and cultivation, and on which he kept a good grade of live stock and had 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 8/3 

established a comfortable set of buikbngs. He also owikhI [jropcrty in tlie 
city of Newport. 

i\Ir. Brown was twice married, first to Nancy J. Routb, on ]\Ia\- 8, 1853. 
To this union nine children were born, namely: Ailey A., Alary E., I-'iiza E., 
John AI. L., Telitha E., Willis T., luhvard L., Charles K., deceased, and 
James O. Nancy J. Routh. the mother, died Deceml)er 30, 1873. 

Mr. Brown was married the second time on April 19, 1878, to Priscilla 
Hays, the daughter of John Newton and Martha (Martin) Hays. The father 
was born in Ohio and the mother in Kentucky. Grandfather Ha\'s came to 
Montgomery county, Indiana, in a very early day and settled in Union 
township, where he farmed. Martha Martin came to this county when a 
young girl with her lirother, and the}' settled in Union township. John Hays 
took an interest in public affairs, and he served a term as trustee of Scott 
township. His family consisted of five children, namely : Berilla Ann. 
George T., Phoebe, Daniel C, all deceased ; Priscilla, who married the sul)ject 
of this memoir. 

Seven children were born to William H. Brown and wife, namely: Esta, 
Bertha A., Martha, Stella E. is deceased. Newton H.. and Lulu. By her 
first marriage to Henry R. Canine. Mrs. Jjrown liecame the mother of one 
child, Maud M. Canine. 

Politically, Mr. Brown was a Reinililican. but he never sought or held 
public office. He was a member of the Christian Disciple church, and fra- 
ternally belonged to the Free and Accepted Masons. 

The death of Mr. Brown occurred in 1906 at the age of seventy-six 
years. 



ARTHUR ALBERT McCAIN. 

Arthur Albert McCain, the present able and pnpular postmaster of the 
city of Crawfordsville, and a newspaper man, was Ijorn in Crawfordsville, 
Indiana, December i, 1868, and is a son of Thomas Hart Benton McCain and 
Salome Snow (Longley) McCain. The father was born in Clinton county, 
Indiana, on January 24, 1839, and was a son of Hugh B. and Minerva (Doug- 
lass) McCain. The McCains are descendants of a long line of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry. Hugh B. McCain was a farmer. His death occurred in the year 
1893. He belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. During the Civil 
war he was a very strong L^nion man. Thomas H. B. McCain, father of our 
subject, worked on the home farm when a boy and at the commencement of 



874 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the war of the states he enlisted in the Eight3'-sixth Indiana Vokinteer In- 
fantry, in which he served with distinction for a period of three years. He 
was sergeant-major of his regiment during the first year of his service, and 
the last year he was first Heutenant of Company I, in the same regiment. He 
participated in a number of important campaigns and battles, such as Stone's 
River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and those of the Atlanta campaign. 

After his career in the anny he returned to Indiana and began publish- 
ing the Delphi Journal, later removing to Lebanon, this state, where he 
published the Patriot for eighteen months, then went to Murfreesboro, Ten- 
nessee, and published a Republican paper for six months. Returning to 
Indiana in 1868, he purchased the Crawfordsville Journal, and brought it up 
to a paying business, proving himself to be a very capable editor and mana- 
ger. He continued to publish the Journal until his death, which occured 
on May i, 1898. His widow is still living in Crawfordsville. He did much 
for the general upbuilding of the city and he was held in the highest esteem 
by all with whom he came in contact. He belonged to McPherson Post, 
Grand .\rmy of the Republic. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and politically, was a staunch Republican. He was postmaster of 
Crawfordsville from 1873 to 1881, filling the office with much satisfaction 
to all. He and Salome Snow Longley were married on May 7, 1867. She 
lived at Lebanon, Indiana. To this union two children were born — Arthur 
Albert, subject of this review; and Fred T., manager, of the Journal. 

Arthur A. McCain grew to manhood in his native city and here attended 
the common schools, later entering Wabash College, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1889, having spent several years in that historic 
institution, being a student in the preparatory as well as the regular college 
branches. He quite naturally took to newspaper work and began as a reporter 
on his fadier's paper, working in this capacity one year, then became business 
manager i:,f the same, continuing successfully thus until October, 1901, then 
became editor, which position he still holds, however, has not been active 
since becoming postmaster. He has kept the paper up to the high standard 
it knew in the days of the elder McCain, and it has continued to be a power 
for the upbuilding of this section of the state, wielding a wide and ever 
growing influence, and it has become a very valuable medium for advertisers. 
Its mechanical appearance is all that could be desired in modern newspaper 
work, and its columns teem daily with the world's most important and 
brightest news. Its editorial page is recognized as a molder nf public opinion. 
The plant is well equipped with up-to-date machinery and all modern appli- 
ances necessary in issuing a live newspaper of the twentieth century. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. hj^ 

Mr. McCain was appointed postmaster at Cra\\tor(ls\ille on Decenilier 
12. IQII, and is still incumbent of that office, the duties nf which he is dis- 
charging to the eiuinent satisfaction of the people and the department. Mr. 
McCain has heen successful from a financial standpoint and is a stockholder 
in several manufacturing concerns. He is a Republican, and is very active 
in the local affairs of his party. Fraternally, he is a member of the Trilie of 
Ben-Hur. 

Mr. McCain was married on October 2^. 1895, at Indianapolis, to 
Ethel Rondthaler, a native of Pennsylvania, her birth having occurred in 
Bethlehem, that state. To this union two children ha\'e been born : Kather- 
ine Louise, who- is attending high scIkioI, and Robert Benton, a student in the 
public schools. 



FRED T. McCAIN. 



Among the newspaper men of Montgomery county the name of Fred T. 
McCain, secretary of the company that publishes Tlic Crazvfordsvillc Journal, 
has long been familiar, and he 'has made his influence felt in a most potent 
manner in the locality of which this history treats, and he is not unknown to 
the wider journalistic fraternity of the state, occupying as he does a prom- 
inent place in his profession and standing high in the esteem of the fraternity 
wherever he is known. He has literally grown up in a newspaper ofifice, fol- 
lowing in the footsteps of his honored father in a professional w'ay, the elder 
McCain proving to be an able preceptor, and was long regarded as a man of 
influence in the affairs of Montgomery county. 

Mr. McCain was born in this county on July 24. 1874. He is a son of 
Thomas Hart Benton and Salome (Longley) McCain. The father was born 
in January 24, 1839, in Clinton county, Indiana, and his death occurred on 
May I, 1908. The mother of our subject was born on July 5. 1841 in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, and she is still living in Crawfords\-ille. 

T. H. B. McCain devoted the major portion of his life to newspaper 
work. He was editor of The Crazufordsi'illc Joiinnil for a good many }'ears. 
Prior to that he was a teacher at Thorntown. lie was a soldier in the Civil 
war, having enlisted in 1861 in the Eighty-sixth Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, 
in which he served gallantly for a period of three years. 

Two children were born to T. 11. B. McCain and wife, namely: .\rthur 
A., a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work: and bVed T.. of tliis 
re\'iew'. 



876 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Fred T. McCain received a common school education, later was a student 
at Wabash College. 

On December 16, 1902 he married Helen Krause, who was born on Janu- 
ary 13, 1880. She is a daughter of J. S. and Frances (Luckenbach) Krause. 
She and her parents were born in Pennsylvania, her birth occurring at the 
town of Bethlehem, and there she recei\'ed a common and high school educa- 
tion. 

To Mr. and Mrs. McCain two children were born, namely : Frederick, 
born November 2, 1903, is attending school; and Samuel, born August 15, 
1910. 

Mr. McCain has practically spent his active life with The Crawfords- 
ville Journal, which he has helped to make one of the leading newspapers in 
western Indiana. He was elected secretary of the firm in 1909, which posi- 
tion he is still holding to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

Politically, Mr. McCain is a Republican. He belongs to the Commercial 
Club, and takes much interest in the affairs of his citv. 



GEORGE THOMAS WILLIAMS. M. D. 

The medical profession of Montgomery county has no abler or worthier 
exponent than Dr. George Thomas Williams, of Crawfordsville, a man who 
has been favored by nature with all the necessary attributes to render one 
successful in this laudable field of endeavor. But notwithstanding the fact 
that he has the proper attributes he has not depended on this solely, having 
studied hard and in fact left no stone unturned whereby he might advance 
himself, keeping fully abreast of the times in all phases of his vocation, and, 
being a man of genial and kindly address, he has won not only the confi- 
dence of the people here but also won his way into their affections so that 
his wide circle of patients might also be termed his friends. 

Dr. Williams was born in Brown township, this county, on June 8, 
1865, and is a son of Henry and Nancy J. (Gott) Williams. The father 
w^as born in Shelby county, Kentucky, October 14, 1836, and was a son of 
Elder Garland and Harriet (Mitchell) Williams. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject was also a native of Shelby county, Kentucky, and 
was a son of Joseph and Julia Williams, both of whom came to Kentucky in 
a very early day and there established the future home of the family and be- 
came influential and well known in Shelby county. A brother of Joseph 



MOXTGOMICRV COINTV. INDIANA. JSjJ 

Williams served in tlie war of 1812 under General Andrew Jackson. Gar- 
land Williams was a farmer and also an ordained minister of the Baptist 
church, in which he did a great work among the pioneers and in its early his- 
tory preached at Crawfordsville. His death occurred in Kentucky. His 
wife also died there. Henry Williams came to Crawfordsville in 1861. lie 
was a cabinet maker by trade and this trade he followed here in connection 
with carpcnterinji and contracting for a number of years, and became well 
known in this line of endeavor throughout the county. He is now living re- 
tired at Brown's Valley. He is a deacon in the Baptist cliurcli. a Democrat, 
and a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

Henry Williams ai)d Nancy J. Gott were married on Novenil)er 27, 
1863. She was born on December 23. 1845. 'n Brown township, this county, 
and here she was reared to womanhood and was educated. She was a 
daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (VanCleve) Gott. Her death occurred 
in April, 1900. 

Four children w-ere born to Henry Williams and wife. namel\' : Lillian 
E. married J. C. Allen, and they live at Brow-n's Valley, this county ; Charles 
G. is a cabinet maker, and lives in Crawfordsville; Mary L. died in October, 
1900; and George T., of this review. 

Dr. Williams grew up in his native county and received a good common 
school education. He began the study of medicine in 1882. He subse- 
quently entered the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, from which in- 
stitution he was graduated with the class of 1887. Soon afterward he estab- 
lished himself in the practice of his profession at Russellville. l)ut remained 
there only two months, wiien he came t'l lirown's \'a]lc\', where he remained 
seventeen years, enjoying a large and successful practice. Then he went to 
Frankfort, Init remained there only six months, w lien he came to Craw- 
fordsville, where he has since remained and is regarded as being in the front 
rank of local medical men, and he has a good practice, his patients being 
found all over the county. In order to further equip himself for his chosen 
life work, Dr. Williams took a post-graduate course in Xcw "S'ork at the 
Post-Graduate School of the University of New York. 

Politically, the Doctor is a Democrat, and while he is loyal in the siij)- 
port of his party he has never been ambitious to hold public oflfice, preferring 
to give his attention exclusively to his professional duties. 

On October 17. 1888. Dr. Williams was married to Mary F. Todd, 
who was lx)rn in Brown township. May 2, 1866. She is a daughter of John- 
son and Ruth (VanCleve) Todd, the former a farmer of Brown township. 
Both of Mrs. Williams' parents are now deceased. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



FRED ATWOOD DENNIS, M. D. 



One of the younger generation of physicians in Montgomery county, 
who is deserving of specific mention in a work of the nature of the one in 
hand is Dr. Fred Atwood Dennis, of Crawfordsville, a man who seems to 
combine all the essential attributes of head and heart that go to make up 
the popular and successful physician and, having somewhat specialized on 
the treatment of tuberculsis, he has won a wide reputation in the same, 
and he is a man to whom the future years must needs hold much of promise. 

Dr. Dennis was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on April 20, 1876, and 
he is a son of Milton P. and Clorinda H. (Wheeler) Dennis. The father 
was of Quaker descent, and for many years engaged successfully in the 
wholesale tea and toljacco business in Indianapolis. He traveled some time 
for a Terre Haute firm, and in the year 1879 located in Crawfordsville, as a 
wholesale and retail grocer, at the corner familiarly known to all old-timers 
as the Dennis corner, which was a regular meeting place for them. Mr. 
Dennis was a successful business man and was highly respected by all who 
knew him. His death occurred in 1890. He was a Mason, belonging to 
the Blue Lodge, also was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
having during the war of the states been a member of Company D, First 
Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, in which he served throughout the war. He 
was for some time a guard in government service on the banks of the Missis- 
sippi river, in St. Louis, Missouri. He married Clorinda H. Wheeler in 
September, 1872. She was born in Hamilton county, Indiana, near West- 
field. To this union seven children were born, six of whom are living at this 
writing. 

Dr. Fred A. Dennis, of this sketch, was educated in the common schools 
of Crawfordsville, being graduated from the high school with the class of 
1894. Having determined upon the medical profession early in life, for 
which he had a decided natural bent, he began reading medicine with Drs. 
Gott & Taylor, and in 1895 he entered the Indiana Medical College, where 
he made an excellent record, and from which he was graduated with the 
class of iSgS. He then began the practice of his profession at .Alamo, 
where he remained two and one-half years, during which time he got an ex- 
cellent start, and, seeking a wider field for the exercise of his talents he 
came to Crawfordsville, where he has continued in the general practice to 
the present time very satisfactory results, enjoying a large and growing 
patronage. He has made a special study of tuberculosis and is regarded as 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 8/9 

an authorit}- and expert in the same. He was elected county Iiealtli officer, 
in which position he ser\ed with much credit and satisfaction for one year. 

Dr. Dennis is a Repubhcan, and fraternally he is a Mason, attaining 
the Knights Templar degrees. He was married on July 29, 1903, to Hen- 
rietta Gilkey, a daughter of James R. and Alice (Wilcox) Gilkey, a well 
known family of Ripley township, this county, who located in Union town- 
ship. She was born on October 2, 1880. 

To the Doctor and wife one child has been born — Margaret E. Dennis, 
who is attending school. 

Dr. Dennis is medical director for the Commonwealth Life Insurance 
Company, He is a fellow in the Sydenham Society, a college organization. 



FAYE O. SCHEXCK. M. D. 

Proper intellectual discipline, thorough professional knowledge, and 
the possession and utilization of the qualities and attributes essential to suc- 
cess has made Dr. Faye O. Schenck, of Crawfordsville, successful in his 
chosen calling and for a numljer of years he has stood among the scholarly 
and enterprising physicians and surgeons in a community long distinguished 
for the high order of its medical talent. While yet young in years, he has 
shown what ambition, close application, and an honorable impulse can ac- 
complish no matter how great obstacles may be encountered. 

Dr. Schenck was bom in Crawfordsville, Indiana, April 12, 1878, and 
he is a son of Henry and Isabelle (Orr) Schenck. The father was born on 
October 31, 1853, in Crawfordsville, being the only son of Ruleff and Mary 
(Snook) Schenck. Ruleff Schenck was a native of Ohio, from which state 
he came to Montgomery county, Indiana, when a young man and when this 
country was little improved. Here he clerked in a store for a number of 
years. He was elected justice of the peace, in which capacity he long served 
the people of this locality. His death occurred in 1859. Mary Schenck was 
the only child of her parents. Her death occurred in 1865. Henry Schenck 
lived on a farm until he was sixteen years of age, then learned the tinner's 
trade, later working as journeyman tinner, and in 1888 he opened a shop on 
South Water street. Crawfordsville, and has since been located there, enjoy- 
ing a good business. Politically, he votes independently. He belongs to the 
Tribe of Ben-Hur, Improved Order of Red Men, including the Haymakers. 
He belongs to the Presbyterian church. 



8»0 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Henry Schenck and Isabelle Orr were married on February 20, 1877. 
She was bom in Ohio on February 12, 1856, and she came to Indiana when 
a child with her parents. Two children were born to Henry Schenck and 
wife, namely: Faye O., of this sketch; and Myrtle B., who is the wife of 
William H. Madir, of Martins Ferry, Ohio. 

Dr. Schenck grew to manhood in his native city and was educated in 
the public schools here, graduating from the high school in 1896. When a 
young man he learned the tinner's trade under his father, but desiring to 
enter a professional career he began the study of medicine and entered the 
Indiana Medical College (now University) at Indianapolis, from which he 
was graduated with the class of 1905. He served as interne in the City 
Hospital in Indianapolis for a period of fourteen months. He then went 
to Crawfordsville and opened an office, where he has since been successfully 
engaged in the practice, and ranks among the most successful and popular 
physicians in Montgomery and adjoining counties. He is medical examiner 
for the Prudential Life Insurance Company, also the John Hancock, the 
Scranton, and the Central States Life Insurance Companies. 

The Doctor is independent in politics. He belongs to the Presbyterian 
church, is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, the Tribe of Ben- 
Hur, and the Improved Order of Red Men, including the Haymakers, being 
treasurer of the local lodge. 

Dr. Schenck was married on October 21, 1908, to Anna Winter, a 
daughter of Mrs. Catherine Winter. 



RICHARD N. CORDING. 

The subject of this sketch has long enjoyed distincti\-e prestige among 
the enterprising men of Montgomery county, having fought his way onward 
and upward to a prominent position in the circles in which he has moved, and 
in every relation of life his voice and influence have been on the side of right 
as he sees and understands the right. He has long ranked with the leading 
business men and substantial citizens of the town of Wingate. He has 
always been interested in all enterprises for the welfare of the community and 
has liberally supported every movement calculated to benefit his fellow men. 
Mr. Cording has witnessed wonderful progress and improvement during the 
time he has lived here, has been a very important factor in local growth and 
prosperity, and has an extended circle of acquaintances throughout the county 
who wish him well, for his life has been exemplary in every respect since cast- 




Rlf'HARn N. CORDING 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INDIANA. 88 1 

ing his lot witli our people. He has taken a surprising interest in our institu- 
tions in view of the fact that he was born under ahen skies and was taught 
to respect another flag. He is deserving of a great deal of credit for what 
he has accomplished, having started in life at the bottom of the ladder and, 
unaided, ascended to a topmost ning through the exercise of those attributes 
that never fail to win. 

Richard N. Cording was born in Somerset, England, November lo, 1851. 
He is a son of John and Jane (Norrish) Cording, both natives of England, 
and there they grew to maturity, were educated and married and reared a 
large family, nine children having been born to them ; one died in early 
infancy, a daughter grew to womanhood and passed away, and a son also 
grew up, dying in middle life, but six of the brothers and sisters are yet living 
and actively engaged in life's duties. The children were named respectively : 
Edward, the eldest; Richard N., subject of this sketch; John, William. Anna 
(deceased); Lucy, the wife of John Marson of South Haven, Michigan; 
Laura, wife of William Herron who lives in Attica. Indiana ; and Thomas, 
who was a well known citizen of South Haven, Michigan, is now deceased; 
Alice, the youngest child, is deceased. 

John Cording, father of the above named children came to the United 
States with his family in 1867, coming on west from the eastern coast where 
they landed after a tedious journey, and they located in Illinois, upon whose 
broad, virgin prairies they found a pleasant home, but did not long remain 
together. It was in the bleak month of January that they arrived there, and 
by spring they were squared away ready to begin raising a crop. The father 
was a skilled agriculturist, and devoted his life to general farming and stock 
raising with gratifying results. His death occurred at an achanced age on 
April 19, 1910, his wife having preceded him to the gra\e in July, 1905. 

Richard N. Cording spent his boyhood days in England and there at- 
tended the public schools. Upon arriving in Illinois he first located in the 
town of Forrest, where he remained but one year. He then came to Indiana 
and engaged to work by the month for Hugh Meharry, a well known resident 
of Montgomery county. An energetic, tactful and quick-thinking young 
man, thoroughly versed in the various phases of agriculture, our subject gave 
his employer eminent satisfaction and continued in his service four years, 
during which time he saved his money and got a good start. At the expira- 
tion of this time he found a home and employment with Isaac Meharry. for 
whom he worked faithfully three years. Then, having mastered the ins and 
outs of stock raising as well as tilling the soil, and the general management of 
(56) 



5S2 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

agricultural interests, he determined to become his own employer, and to this 
end located on a neighboring farm. He was successful from the start and 
each succeeding year found him further advanced, until he eventually became 
one of the most progressive general farmers and stock raisers in Montgomery 
county and he is now the owner of a valuable and highly improved landed 
estate of eight hundred and twenty-nine acres, a part of which is in Indiana 
and a part in Illinois. It is all productive, well tiled, tillable and fertile. He 
sold out part of his farming interests in the year 1890 and removed to his 
present commodious home in the town of Wingate. Here he was not long 
idle, almost immediately entering into a partnership with Mr. Sturm. The 
succeeding year he materially improved the appearance of the main thorough- 
fare of his town when he erected thereon one of the most substantial, attrac- 
tive and convenient brick blocks in this section of the state. He has been 
engaged in the mercantile business here since 1891 and has built up a large 
and ever growing trade with the surrounding country, carrying at all seasons 
a complete and carefully selected stock of up-to-date merchandise. 

Mr. Cording is a Democrat and has long been active in the ranks. Fra- 
ternally, he belongs to the Masonic Order, having attained the thirty-second 
degree in that time-honored fraternity. He is a member of the Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Murat Temple, Indianapolis. 
Religiously he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and is a liberal 
supporter of the same. He is also a Knights Templar, and a member of the 
Knights of Pythias. He belongs to the National Detective Association. 

Mr. Cording has been twice married, first, to Ellen P. Djck, who was 
born and reared in Montgomery county, Indiana. Together they began their 
home life upon the farm, and there remained for twelve years. After the 
death of Mr. Cording's first wife he was united in marriage to Villa Hayes, 
who was born near Elmdale, this county. 

Our subject's family consisted of three children, namely : Effie died in 
infancy; E. John, who was a student in DePauw University, at Greencastle, 
Indiana, died in 1904; and Opal, who is at home. 



GEORGE RAYMOND WHITE. 

The subject of this sketch, well known manager of Music Hall in Craw- 
fordsville, is a man who has engaged in many lines of endeavor, and has 
shown that he is the possessor of varied talents, inheriting many of the com- 
mendable traits of his distinguished father, who was one of the noted men 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 88^ 

of his day and generation in western Indiana, whose name will continue to 
be honored by the people here through succeeding generations. 

Mr. White was born August 28, 1868, in Crawfordsville, and he is a 
son of Michael Daugherty White and Laura E. (McMechan) White. The 
father was born on a farm in Clark county, Ohio, September 8, 1827, and 
was a son of Lanson and Mary (Daugherty) White, the former a native of 
New York, and was a son of Nathaniel White, a Revolutionary soldier, who 
first emigrated to Ohio and thence to Tippecanoe county, Indiana, and died 
there at the age of seventy-six years, at Greenbush. Lanson White came 
with his father and his own family to Tippecanoe county in 1829, locating 
on a farm. His death occurred in 1844 in that county. Mary Daugherty 
\Miite was born in Pennsylvania in April, 1807. From that state she came 
to Ohio with her parents and there married Lanson White, in 1824. Her 
death occurred in Danville, Illinois, in 1892. 

Michael D. White received his early education in the common schools, 
as times afforded, in Tippecanoe county. In 1848 he removed to Craw- 
fordsville and attended what was known as the old County Seminary, later 
was a student in Wabash College for a period of four years. Then on ac- 
count of his health he went to Darlington and clerked in a store for one 
year. Deciding upon a legal career he returned to Crawfordsville in 1853 
and read law with the late Gen. Lew Wallace, for one year, after which he 
was ofifered full partnership, which he gladly accepted. He made rapid 
progress in his studies and was admitted to the bar in the si:)ring of 1854, 
and in the fall of that year was elected prosecuting attorney for the common 
pleas court, of Montgomery and Boone counties, sen-ing two years, refusing 
a second term. He continued to practice law with Lew Wallace, the latter 
being elected state senator in 1856, from Montgomery county, and during his 
absence Mr. White conducted the affairs of the office alone. This partner- 
ship lasted until 1859, when Mr. Wallace joined Cok Sam C. Wilson, Mr. 
White retaining the old office. In i860 the latter was elected state senator, 
having the distinction of being the first Republican e\er elected senator from 
Montgomery county. He served with distinction for a period of four years, 
giving entire satisfaction to his constituents, and refused a second nomina- 
tion. That was during the Civil war period, and while serving as senator 
Mr. White was largely engaged in raising soldiers for sen'ice in the Union 
arniv. After his term of office had expired he resumed the practice of law, 
and in 1876, having continued to take an active part in public affairs, he was 



884 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

elected to Congress, the duties of which responsible post he discharged with 
rare fidehty and satisfaction for a period of two years, but was defeated for 
a second nomination by a gang of scheming poHticians, although he was un- 
doubtedly the people's choice. He resumed the practice of law, and con- 
tinued a leader of the local bar until in August, 191 1, when he retired. 

Michael D. White is a member of the Masonic Order. He has been 
recognized as a social member of the Tribe of Ben-Hur. He belongs to the 
Christian church. On April 29, 1858, he was united in marriage in Craw- 
fordsville to Laura E. McMechan. She was a daughter of Dr. James G. 
and Eliza McMechan, and she was born in Crawfordsville on May 14, 1837. 
Her father was a native of Ohio, and he came to Montgomery county in an 
early day, and here practiced medicine until his death on June 7, 1899, ^^ 
the advanced age of ninety-one years. His wife preceded him to the grave 
in 1892. To Michael D. White and wife ten children were born, live of 
whom are still living, namely: Mellie E., wife of Wallace A. Stillwell, of 
Los Angeles; John L. lives in Portland, Oregon; George Raymond, subject 
of this sketch ; Grace M., wife of Earl C. Finlay, of Spokane, Washington ; 
and Anna L., wife of Howard L. Shav,-, of Dayton, Ohio. 

George R. \\'hite received a good common school education, and he 
learned telegraphy when a young man, and he worked at this for the West- 
ern Union, in Indianapolis, St. Louis and a number of other places, wherever 
he was sent, following the same until 1898, giving eminent satisfaction, being 
an expert and a conscientious worker. 

When the Spanish-American war came on in 1898, Mr. White enlisted 
for service in the signal corps as a telegrapher, and served out his term of 
enlistment. In the meantime he injured his wrist, which permanently dis- 
abled him for his chosen work as telegrapher. He then engaged as a broker, 
with offices in the Knights of Pythias building, Crawfordsville. He was a 
member of the Chicago and New York exchange. He subsequently engaged 
in the picture show business, operating in Independence, Kansas, for three 
years, then sold out and returned to Crawfordsville, buying out the Air- 
dome, next to the Ben-Hur building. This he now leases, and manages the 
Music Hall, the only opera house in Crawfordsville, and he is making a great 
success of the same, giving the people excellent shows. 

Politically, he is a Republican. He belongs to the Christian church, 
and is a member of the Benevolept and Protective Order of Elks. He is well 
liked and has a host of friends wherever he is known. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INDIANA. 



LOUIS W. OTTO. 



It is no ver}' rare tiling for a poor Ixiy in our countr}' to become a pros- 
perous man and occupy a commanding position in the business world, but 
many who have fought their way from poverty to wealth, from obscurity to 
prominence, retain some marks and scars of the conflict. They are apt to 
be narrow and grasping, even if not sordid and unscrupulous. Louis W. 
Otto, well known and successful jeweler of Crawfordsville, Montgomery 
county, although he did not come up from the ranks of the poverty stricken, 
and has not reached the affluence of the rich, yet he has worked his way 
from a modest beginning to a comfortable station in the world of affairs, 
being an instance of a man who has achieved success without paying the 
price at which it is so often bought. His success has not removed him 
further from his fellow men, but has brought him into nearer and more in- 
timate relations with them. and. although he leads a busy life, he has yet 
found time to devote to those interests which develop the intellectual and 
moral nature of man, living not to himself alone, but willing to assist his 
fellow man on the highway of life when ever proper occasion presents itself. 
He is of German extraction and seems to have inherited many of tlie char- 
acteristics that win from his sterling ancestors. 

Mr. Otto was bom in Ripley county, Indiana, December lo, 1864, and 
is a son of Franz E. and Marie Otto. They were both born, reared and 
educated in Saxony, Germany, and there they spent their earlier years, 
finally emigrating to the LTnited States and settling in Ripley county, and 
became very comfortably established through their thrift and frugality, 
and here spent the rest of their lives, having been deceased now a number 
of years. They were honest, hard-working people, and respected by their 
neighbors. 

Louis W. Otto left the old homestead in Rijjley county and received a 
good common school education. When a young man he learned the watch 
making and jeweler's trade, becoming quite proficient in them, for he went 
into the work enthusiastically, having been apprenticed to an excellent work- 
man in Aurora, Indiana, remaining with him three years, then one year as a 
journeyman. 

Thus well equipped for his chosen vocation Mr. Otto went to Pomroy. 
Ohio, where he remained for a time, then to Gallipolis, that state. We next 
find him in Kentucky, following his trade in Georgetown and Paducah, re- 
spectively. He then came back to Indiana and located at Rushville, and 



886 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

from there came to Crawfordsville in 1885 and started in business on Green 
street, where the Western Union telegraph office is now located, being in 
partnership under the firm name of Rost & Otto, and they continued to- 
gether for four years, when they dissolved partnership and our subject 
located at iii South Washington street, remaining there ten years, then 
came to his present location, in 1899. He was successful from the first and 
has enjoyed a constantly growing and lucrative business, his hundreds of 
customers coming from over a wide radius of territory, and many of the 
customers he had a quarter of a century ago still patronize him, this being 
sufficient evidence of his honesty and courtesy in dealing with the public. 
He has an attractive and modernly appointed store, carrying at all times a 
large and carefully selected stock of jewelry and everything commonly found 
in an up-to-date store of this kind, diamonds and fine jewelry being what he 
specializes on. 

Politically, Mr. Otto is a Republican, but he has never been especially 
active in public affairs. Religiously, he belongs to the Methodist church. 
He is prominent in fraternal circles. He belongs to the Improved Order of 
Red Men, being Past Great Sachem of Indiana in this order. He: holds 
membership with the Modern Woodmen of America, and is a member of the 
board of auditors of the Head Camp; he also belongs to the Tribe of Ben- 
Hur and the Kjiights of Pythias. 

Mr. Otto was married in October, 1889, to Mary Keegan, a daughter 
of Dr. and Mrs. Keegan, a well known and highly respected family. Mrs. 
Otto, who was a woman of gracious personal characteristics, was called to 
her eternal rest in October, 1912, leaving three children, namely: Marie, 
who is in Vassar College; Fredeick Keegan and Elsa Louise are both at- 
tending high school in Crawfordsville. 

Mr. Otto was twice elected president of the Crawfordsville Commercial 
Association. 



JASPER HORNBECK. 

The gentleman whose name heads this paragraph is widely known as 
one of the enterprising merchants of Montgomery county. Jasper Horn- 
beck, now a leading grocer of the city of Crawfordsville, has for years been 
prominently identified with the commercial interests of his localit}-. His 
well directed efforts in the practical affairs of life, has capable management 
of his business interests and his sound judgment have brought large rewards 



MONTGOMKKV COrXTV, INDIANA. 88/ 

for the labor he has expended, and liis Hfe demonstrates what may i>e accom- 
pHshed in this free land of ours by those who show a willingness to work 
and be honest in the various relations of life. 

Mr. Hornbeck was born on December 23, 1843, '" Madison county, 
Ohio, and he is a son of Andrew and Clarissa C. (Carrell) Hornbeck. The 
father was also a native of Madison county, Ohio, and was a descendant of 
\'irginians who settled in that county at an early date. He came to Tipton 
county, Indiana, in 1848, and engaged in farming, having entered eighty 
acres of land from the government, and bought one hundred and eighty 
acres. This he hired oj^erated and used it for the grazing of his herds. He 
engaged, in connection with general farming, in stock raising and cattle 
driving. He was very successful, especially as a stock man. His death oc- 
curred in Tipton county in 1852. Politically, he was a Democrat, and in 
religious matters a Methodist. 

Clarissa Carrell-Hornbeck, mother of our subject, was also born in Ohio 
and was also of Virginia stock. Her death occurred in Fountain county, In- 
diana, in 1887. 

Jasper Hornbeck received the usual log-school education, which he at- 
tended three winters, then began his business career by clerking in a grocery 
store on East Washington street, Indianapolis, remaining there two years, 
during which he gave his employer satisfactory service and learned the ins 
and outs of this line of endeavor. He then began working for the first ice 
cream manufacturer in Indianapolis, remaining with him one year, then 
went to Tipton, Indiana, and clerked in a dry goods store. Then he worked 
on a Boone county farm until 1861, when he enlisted in Company G, Fifty- 
fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in the three months' service. He was de- 
tailed to guard prisoners at Indianapolis, later going to Kentucky and was 
in the battle which started at Cumberland Gap and was also in the engage- 
ment at Richmond, Kentucky'. After a very faithful service he was honor- 
ably discharged. 

After his career in the army Mr. Hornbeck went to Whitestown, where 
he engaged in the grocery business for himself, which he conducted one year, 
aftef which he returned to Indianapolis, where he engaged in the grocery 
business on Virginia avenue for a year, then went again to Tipton and 
clerked in a general store two years, then was in a general store in Thorn- 
town for five years. We next find him at Darlington, in the general mer- 
chandise business for himself, which he conducteil with his usual success 
until 1872, when he went to Arkansas and clerked for three years, after 



888 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

which he returned to Crawfordsville and clerked for four years, then worked 
as a stationary engineer for three years for the Montgomery Lumber Com- 
pany. He next took a position with Henry Alfry, the noted heading factory 
and saw mill man, remaining with him for a period of twenty-seven years, 
giving eminent satisfaction, as might be inferred from his long retention. 
In 1909 Mr. Hornbeck purchased his present grocery store in Crawfords- 
ville and has since conducted the same, enjoying a large and growing trade, 
with the town and county. 

Politically, he is a Republican, and he belongs to McPherson Posf, 
Grand Army of the Republic. He is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and of the Methodist church. 

Mr. Hornbeck was married, first, in November, 1862, to Susan Barn- 
hart, who was born at Mt. Holly, Ohio, in 1839. Her death occurred on 
December 25, 1882. In December, 1884, he was again married, his last wife 
being Emma Chapman, who was born in Boone county. 



SAMUEL DUNN SYMMES. 

Perhaps no one agency in all the world has done so much for public 
progress as the press, and an enterprising, well-edited journal is a most im- 
portant factor in promoting the welfare and prosperity of any community. 
It adds to the intelligence of the people through its transmission of foreign 
and domestic news and through its discussion of the leading questions and 
issues of the day, and more than that, it makes the town or city which it 
represents known outside of the immediate locality, as it is sent each day or 
week into other districts, carrying with it an account of the events trans- 
piring in its home locality, the advancement and progress there being made, 
and the advantages which it ofifers to its residents along moral, educational, 
social and commercial lines. Montgomery county is certainly indebted to its 
wide-awake journals in no small degree, and one of the men who has been a 
potent factor in the local field of newspaperdom is Samuel Dunn Symmes. 
He has long been connected with journalistic work, and his ability is widely 
acknowledged among contemporary newspaper men and the public in general. 

Mr. Symmes was born in Pleasant, Indiana, October 20, 1856, and he 
is a son of Rev. Francis Marion Symmes and Mary Jane (Dunn) Symmes. 
The father was bom on November 18, 1827, near Symmes Corners, Ohio. 
He was a son of Daniel T. and Lucinda (Randolph) Symmes. Daniel T. 




SAMUEL D. SY.MMES 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 889 

Symmes was born at the same place, as was his son. This family was one 
of the early settlers of Butler county. Mrs. Symmes was a direct decendant 
of Pocahontas, the famous Indian maid of old colonial Virginia. Rev. F. 
M. Symmes was graduated from Hanover College, later from Princeton 
Theological Seminary, at Princeton, New Jersey. His first charge as Presby- 
terian minister was at Pleasant, Indiana, and later he had charges at Vernon, 
Crawfordsville, Brazil, Bedford, Lebanon, Romney, Alamo, Paoli and Or- 
leans, then went to Pittsburg, Kansas, in 1883, also had charge of churches at 
Florence and Derby, Kansas, later returning to Pittsburg, where his death oc- 
curred on September 5, 1905, after a useful, honorable and devoted life, hav- 
ing done a most commendable work as a minister of the Gospel, being well 
liked and popular where\er he went and building up the churches of which he 
had charge. He was an earnest and eloquent pulpit orator and a man of pleas- 
ing personality. He belonged to the Masonic Order, including the Knights 
Templar degrees. He could fill any position in that branch of Masonry. Politi- 
cally, he was a Republican; however, his ancestors were Democrats. He and 
Mary Jane Dunn were married in March. 1855. She was living at Craw- 
fordsville. She was a daughter of Nathaniel A. and Sophia (Irvin) Dunn. 
Her father was one of the first settlers of Montgomery county, locating at 
Crawfordsville when there was but a mere handful of houses. He owned 
what is now the northwest quarter-section of what is at present the main 
part of the city, also owned several farms, being one of the most substantial 
and best known business men of the county in his day and generation. In his 
early life he was a tanner by trade. He served in the war of 1812. He and 
his wife were natives of Kentucky. Mrs. Symmes died on February 12, 

1895- 

Samuel D. Symmes, of this review, received liis education in the com- 
mon schools of Lebanon, and in Wabash College. He learned the printer's 
trade in the old Star ofifice, and worked at that for a period of twenty years, 
becoming well known to the trade in this section of the state and highly effi- 
cient. He was then elected township trustee, in which position he served 
from August, 1895, to November, 1900. also from January i, 1905. till 
January i, 1909. This was in L''nion township in which is the city of Craw- 
fordsville. He discharged his duties in a manner that reflected much credit 
upon himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. W^hen he was first trus- 
tee of this township he worked out the plan of consolidated school, men- 
tioned in the educational chapter of this work. 

After his term of office had expired he purchased the Sunday Star at 



»90 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Crawfordsville, which he ran successfully for four years. It is now a part of 
the Journal. 

Mr. Symmes was prominent in the organization of the Patriotic Order 
Sons of America, and is now national vice-president of that organization, 
which has grown into a large body. He is also state secretary. He is fill- 
ing these positions in an eminently successful manner and has become widely 
known in this connection. He is a member of the Kinights of Pythias, and 
has filled all the offices in the local lodge, and was representative to the Grand 
Lodge. He is a member of the Masonic Order, also the Modern Woodmen 
of America, the Order of Owls, the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and is a charter member of the Tribe of Ben-Hur. He belongs to the 
Printers Union. 

Mr. Symmes was married on March 31, 1883 to Nancy, Jane McCaine, a 
daughter of Vardaman McCaine and wife, of Bedford, Indiana. Her 
father was a native of Ireland. 

To Mr. Symmes and wife five children have been born, four of whom are 
living, namely: Frank A., of Indianapolis, is an attorney; Clyde B., of 
Evansville, Indiana; William V., who is at home and attending school; Ruth 
M. is the wife of Henry O. Armstrong, and they li\-e in Crawfordsville. 



ARCHELAUS CHRISTIAN AUSTIN. 

This is an age in which the farmer stands pre-eminently above any 
other class as a producer of wealth. He simply takes advantage of the winds, 
the warm air, the bright sunshine and the refreshing rains, and with the 
help of the Creator and by virtue of his own skill in handling nature's gifts 
he creates grain, hay, livestock and vegetables, all of which are absolute 
necessities to the inhabitants of the world. One of the best known and 
most successful agriculturists about the city of Crawfordsville is Archelaus 
Christian Austin, who is the owner of a very valuable and productive farm 
adjoining the city. 

Mr. Austin was born in the city in which he has been content to spend 
his life and where he still resides, on November 19, 1843. He is a descend- 
ant of one of the pioneer families of Montgomery county, being a son of 
Samuel Wilson Austin and Nancy (Beaver) Austin. The father was born 
on November 18, 181 8, in Bath county, Kentucky, and was a son of John 
Baden Austin and Nancy (Vanhook) Austin, the former having been born 



MONTGOMERY COrNTY, INDIAXA. 89I 

near tlie Natural Bridge, Virginia, in 1796, and when a )oung man he came 
with his parents to Bath county, Kentucky, where he worked," and enjoyed 
little better conditions than the average for those primordeal times, being a 
Missionary Baptist minister. Eventually, he removed to Montgomery coun- 
ty, Indiana, and purchased a farm at the western edge of the city of Craw- 
fordsville, but shortly afterwards traded the same for a stock of goods at 
Pleasant Hill. From there he returned to Crawfordsville, and upon the or- 
ganization of ]\Iontgomery county was elected its first auditor, remaining in 
that office for a period of eight years. During all these years of varied en- 
deavor he continued to preach occasionally and did much good among the 
pioneers. His death occurred in 1868 or 1869. He married Nancy Van- 
hook. They became the parents of seven children. Her death occurred 
while Mr. Austin was in his second term of ofifice as auditor. 

Samuel Wilson Austin was educated in the common schools of Mont- 
gomery county, and in his early manhood days he clerked, later working as 
bookkeeper in Crawfordsville for Campbell, Galey & Hunter, during the war 
of the Rebellion. The second year after the organization of the First 
National Bank be was its head bookkeeper, being later advanced to cashier 
of the same, and remained in this position to within about two years of his 
death, which occurred in November, 1892, at an advanced age. He was well 
and favorably known throughout this localit)-, and was an excellent business 
man and broad-minded citizen. Politically, he was a Republican. He was 
a Methodist, and he belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
and Nancy Beaver were married on January 6, 1842. She was a daughter 
of Christian and Mary (Shoemaker) Beaver, and her birth occurred on 
Februaiy 24, 1822, in Montgomery county, Indiana. Her parents were 
pioneers here. She died in May, i860, leaving four children, namely: 
.\rchelaus Christian, of this sketch ; .\lbert O.. who lives five miles north 
of Crawfordsville; Henry M., who lives west of Craw'fordsville : Frank is a 
resident of Crawfordsville. 

Archelaus C. Austin grew to manhood in Crawfordsville and here he 
received a good common school education, being a student at the commence- 
ment of the Civil war. He did not hesitate to leave his books and home as- 
sociations and offer his services to his country, so early in the conflict he 
enlisted in the Eighteenth Indiana Battery, under Col. Eli Lilly, and he 
served with much faithfulness and credit until the close of tiie war, taking 
part in many notable engagements. He was honorabl\- discharged and was 
mustered out on June 29, 1865. 



892 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

After his service in the army, Mr. Austin returned to Crawfordsville 
and turned his attention to farming, which he has continued to make his Hfe 
work, being now the owner of a fine and modernly improved farm of one 
hundred and ninety-two acres joining the city on the east, and he has been 
very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. He owns a commod- 
ious home at 312 East Main street. 

Politically, Mr. Austin is a Republican. His family belong to the 
Methodist church. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Austin was married in 1871 to Annie Munns, a native of Mont- 
gomery county, and a daughter of George and Anna (Shanklin) Munns. 
George Munns was born in Kentucky in 1813, and followed farming as an 
occupation. He came to Indiana in the early days of the state. At one 
time his owning in this locality approximated one thousand acres. Like many 
others, he was a Whig in early life, but changed to the Republican politics 
when organized. His death occurred in 1877. Mrs. Austin's mother came 
to this state with her people prior to the father. The farm upon which her 
folks settled is still in the Munns' name. She died March 17, 1909. He was 
a member of the Baptist church, and she of the Presbyterian. 



DAVID HENRY DAVIDSON. 

"Man is the noblest work of God," wrote England's great poet-phil- 
osopher, Alexander Pope, "and a truly noble man but fulfills the plan of the 
Creator." The life of man describes a circle. The cycles of existence of 
different lives form distinct concentric circles, for some are given but a quarter 
of a century wherein to complete their appointed work, while the span of others 
varies to the allotted three score and ten. But how true and comforting 
that life is measured, not by years alone, but rather b}^ a purpose achieved, by 
noble deeds accredited to it. How often we are confronted, when a loved 
friend and co-worker answers the final summons, with the question "Why 
must he go when there remains still so much for him to do, when he can so 
illy be spared ?" But the grim messenger heeds not and we are left to mourn 
and accept submissively. The death of the late David Henry Davidson 
removed from Montgomery county one of her most substantial and highly 
esteemed agriculturists and the many beautiful tributes to his high standing 
as a citizen attested to the abiding place he had in the hearts and affections 
of his many friends throughout this locality, and his career, eminently hon- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 893 

orable and successful, is commended as an example tor tiie younj^er >i;enera- 
tion of farmers who read these pages. 

Mr. Davidson was bom on July 26, 1852, and was a son of William 
F. and Mary Ann (Hostetter) Davidson. The father was born in 1798 in 
Pennsylvania and there he spent his early life, but was not yet thirty years 
old when, following other pioneers westward, he located in Montgomery 
county, Indiana, when this country was practically a wilderness. It was in 
the year 1827 that he established the future home of the family in this county 
and from that remote day to tliis the Davidson have been well known here. 
He entered eighty acres of land from the government where the buildings 
of the Davidson farm now stand. There he cleared a "patch" on which he 
erected his log cabin and began life like the typical first settler. He worked 
hard and soon had a farm developed and a comfortable residence. After 
getting his place started he walked to Ohio where he married, on September 
II, 1828, Amanda Schnof, returning then to his new home in this county. 
He made the long journey from the East on foot when he first penetrated 
the wilderness to the westland, carrying his gun, powder horn, and a few 
other necessities. The old powder horn is still in the family, also the sheep 
skin deed which the government gave him, and the old flax hackle which was 
brought from Scotland. He was a renowned fiddler in his day and played 
frequently for dances for young folks. He was a man of religious tempera- 
ment; always returned thanks for his food, and observed the Golden Rule 
in his every day life; however, he never belonged to any church. He was a 
man of industry and he added considerable land to his original eighty. He 
was a very ambitious man and did much to set the wheels of progress re- 
volving in this locality. Four children were born to them, three dying in 
childhood. Jasper N. reached maturity. His first wife dying, he was mar- 
ried the second time to Mary Ann Hostetter on Feljruary 14, 1839. They 
were the parents of eight children, namely: Zerelda J., married to P. H. 
Burns, of Crawfordsville ; Catherine, married Eli Armentrout; Sarah mar- 
ried to Dave Harshbarger; William Sherman married to Louisa Harrison; 
Margaret, deceased: David H., our subject, and two others, who died in 
infancy. 

David H. Davidson, the immediate subject of this memoir, grew to 
manhood on the old homestead, amid pioneer environment, and he had plenty 
of hard work to do in assisting his father develop tiie ])lace from the virgin 
soil, a task which required many years of close application. He received a 
meager education in the inadequate rural schools of his day. He remained 



894 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

on the home place all his life, keeping it well improved and well cultivated, 
owning the same at the time of his death, which occurred on November 
29, 1908. 

Fraternally, he belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He belonged to the agricultural association from the time of its organization, 
and was president of the same for one year. He did much to make it a 
success. He was also a member of the Horse Thief Detective Association. 

Mr. Davidson was married on November 12, 1874, to Salome E. Harsh- 
barger, a daughter of Jacob M. and Mary (Myers) Harshbarger. She was 
born in Clark township, Montgomery county, January 11, 1854. There 
she grew to womanhood and was educated in the common schools. 

Jacob M. Harshbarger was born March 10, 1828, near Roanoke, Vir- 
ginia, and was a son of Jacob, Sr., and Salome (Ammen) Harshbarger, the 
former born in Pennsylvania June 24, 1792, and was a son of Samuel and 
Elizabeth (Gish) Harshbarger. Samuel Harshbarger was born on Septem- 
ber 19. 1759, in Pennsylvania. From that state he went to Virginia and 
from there came to Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1833. He had been 
preceded here in the spring of 1829 by Jacob Harshbarger. The latter en- 
tered from the government fifteen hundred acres of land north of Ladoga, 
and owned nearly three thousand acres at one time. Much of this valuable 
land he cleared and farmed on an extensive scale, becoming" one of the lead- 
ing farmers and most substantial citizens in his township. He was a mill- 
wright by trade, which he followed in connection with farming, his children 
doing the actual work on the place. His death occurred in 1866. He was 
a member of the German Baptist church. He was often seen poring over 
his mammoth Bible, which weighed sixteen pounds and measured fifteen and 
one-half by ten inches and was six inches thick. It was of German manu- 
facture, of deer skin cover and was issued over one hundred years ago. He 
gave each of his eight children one hundred and sixty acres of good land. 
His wife died in 1870. Ten children were born to them, only two of whom 
are now living. Eight of them lived to be over sixty-four years old. 

Jacob M. Harshbarger grew up on the home farm and received only a 
meager education; he devoted his life to farming and stock raising on a large 
scale. He owned at one time over fourteen hundred acres of valuable land, 
and he gave some to his children. He is still hale and hearty, and successful 
in a business way, being one of the substantial men of the community. Mr. 
Harshbarger served very faithfully and acceptably as county commissioner 
from 1880 to 1882. He is well liked by everybody, having always lived an 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 895 

honorable and upriglit life and is kind, neighborly and charitable. He was 
married to Mary Myers on April 13, 1848, and after a happy married life 
of over a half century she was called to her rest on June 1 7, 1900. They cele- 
brated their golden wedding on the farm where they w ere married and spent 
their married life. Five children were l)orn to tliem. namely: Marion and 
Henry Meda are both deceased; Salome E., who married Mr. Davidson of 
this memoir; Amanda, is the wife of E. V. Brookshire, and they live in 
Washington City; George, lives in Clark township, this county. No better 
or more helpful family has ever lived in Montgomery county than the Harsh- 
bargers and none more highly respected. 

The union of David H. Davidson and wife was blessed by the birth of 
eight children, namely : Warner M., who lives in Union township, this 
county; Dr. Homer J. and Dr. Cline F., both live in Seattle, Washington; 
Nora A. is the wife of M. Kesler and they live in Union township; Lola M. 
also lives in the city of Seattle, where she is engaged in teaching; Ethel H. 
is at home ; Mary C. and Mina S. are both attending high school. 



LEE S. WARXER. 



The senior member of the firm of Warner & Peck is Lee S. Warner, 
who was born in Vienna, Austria, July 26, 1849, and there he spent his early 
boyhood years, being about twelve years of age when, in 1862, he emigrated 
to the United States, settling in Buffalo, New York. While there he attended 
school part of the time and also worked in a clothing store. Learning the 
ins and outs of this line of endeavor he began the clothing business for him- 
self in 1870 at Effingham, Illinois, remaining there ten years during which 
he got a good start, then came to Crawfordsville where he remained a short 
time, subsequently returning to Buffalo, New York, where he engaged suc- 
cessfully in the wholesale business for a period of thirteen years, after which 
he returned to Crawfordsville in 1893 ^"^ engaged in the clothing business. 
He formed a partnership with Dumont M. Peck. They handle Hart, 
Schaffner & Marx and Stein-Blocks brands of clotliing, the L System of 
Clothcraft, Regal shoes for men (exclusively), Holland shoes for boys; 
Ederheimer Stein childrens' clothes, also Skolny clothes; Knox, Stetson and 
Imperial hats: Manhattan and Davies shirts: Sweet Orr. Marx & Haas 
cloths, traveling bags, trunks, in fact, everything that is found in any large, 
modern store of this kind in any of the thriving cities of the country. 



896 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Fraternally, Mr. Warner is a member of the Masonic Order, including 
all of the York Rites, and the fourteenth degree in the Scottish Rite ; he also 
belongs to the Tribe of Ben-Hur, and the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. Politically, he is a Progressive. 

Mr. Warner was married on August 21, 1873 to Rachael Wiener, of 
Buffalo, New York, and to this union three children have been born, namely : 
Juliet A., wife of Dumont M. Peck, junior member of the firm of Warner 
& Peck; Sidney M., who resides in Indianapolis; and Cornelia, wife of J. 
Whitford, residents of St. Petersburg, Florida. 



CAPT. MARTIN V. WERT. 

One of the best known and deservedly popular men in Montgomery 
county is Capt. Martin V. Wert, the present able and public spirited mayor 
of the city of Crawfordsville, in which position he is doing much for the 
permanent good of the city and showing the people that he is a man of 
progressive ideas, broad-minded and energetic for the general weal. He is 
by nature and training a military man, and his record as a soldier is indeed 
an enviable one. He is a born leader of men and has stamped the impress of 
his strong personality on all that he has met. And yet with all his indomitable 
courage, diplomacy, progressiveness and widespread popularity he is entirely 
unassuming and a recognized friend of the common people, yet reserving a 
proper dignity, as becomes a man of his type, so that he is highly esteemed 
by all who know him. He is a business man of more than ordinary ability, 
and ranks among the most substantial and representative citizens of his city 
and county. 

Capt. Wert was born in Fountain county, Indiana, on a farm, July 17, 
1841, and he is a son of Henry and Isabelle Wert, one of the honored old 
families of this section of the great Wabash country. Our subject was 
reared on the home farm and there assisted with the general work when a 
boy. During the winter months he attended the common schools of his 
neighborhood, and was graduated from the Fountain county high school in 
i860. 

The war of the states coming on, Mr. Wert could not stand idly by 
and see the old flag insulted, so on October i, 1861 he enlisted in Company B, 
Tenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and he served with much credit and dis- 
tinction during the rest of the war, having charge at one time of a squad from 




CAPT. MARTIN V. WERT 



MOXTGOiMERV COrXTY. INDIANA. 897 

his regiment that was detailed to guard trains and cdttmi. This required 
skill and tact and was very dangerous. He took part in numerous important 
campaigns and battles, and was twice wounded, once at M\\\ Springs and also 
at the great battle of Chickaniauga. On Septemljer 3, 1864. he was trans- 
ferred to Company B, Fifty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and he con- 
tinued to serve faithfully with this regiment until honorably discharged on 
November i, 1864. 

After his career in the army he returned home and learned the carpen- 
ter's trade, and in the year 1870 he came to Crawfordsville and engaged in 
the contracting business, meeting with much success from the first. This 
has continued to be his chief life work, and his business has increased with 
the advancing years until he has become one of the financially strong men of 
the city and has accumulated considerable valuable property. 

Captain Wert was elected, in August, 1887, first lieutenant of Company 
D, First Regiment Indiana National Guard, and was very active in this com- 
pany for three years. Then upon the transferring of the company to the 
Second Regiment and assignment to Company I, he was elected captain of 
Company M, Second Regiment Indiana National Guard in recognition of his 
earnest work in the military afifairs of the state. Upon the outbreak of the 
Spanish-American war, this company started to the front, but the regiment 
of which it was a part was discharged on April 26, 1898. Captain Wert is 
still verv active in military affairs. He was one of the leading spirits in the 
making of the history of the old Tenth Regiment, which was first published 
a number of years ago. 

Politically, the Captain has also been prominent for years, always active 
in the ranks of the Republican party. He was twice elected a member of the 
city council, and in 1910 was elected mayor of Crawfordsville the duties of 
which important office he has discharged in a manner that has reHectcd much 
credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned, and he 
is still incumbent of this office. He is a man of progressive ideas, and stands 
for law enforcement at all times, and he insists on those under him ii])eying 
the laws to the letter. 

Captain Wert was married in 1868 to Adeline .\ston. of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, daughter of John B. and Ann (Coats) Aston. The father was a 
farmer and lived all his life in Hamilton county, Ohio. Our subject and 
wife have two children, namel\- : Albert E., an architect, living in New 
York city; Arthur B., a contractor, lives in Crawfordsville. Pioth tliese sons 
are very successful in their chosen fields of endea\or. 
'(57) 



898 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ABRAHAM H. HERNLY. 

Fifty years ago, when the slaveholder's rebellion broke out with all its 
fury at Fort Sumter and when it looked as if the Union that all loved so 
much would be dissolved, many households became divided, some members 
of a family going into the Federal army and others casting their lots with 
the Confederacy; some enlisted to save the federation of states, even though 
they had to free their slaves to do so. It was a time when there could be no 
temporizing and no halting, — no half-way position, — for all who were not 
for the Union were against it, and both sides hated the man who claimed to 
l>e neutral because he did not want to risk his life on the field of battle and 
had no principles to sustain. The Hernly family was alive to the gravity of 
the national conflict, and realized that the struggle impending was something 
more than a holiday undertaking and knew that it meant great hardship and 
the shedding of rivers of blood before the flag could again wave from Maine 
to Florida and from the Mexican Gulf to the states of the far Northwest. 
But they cbd not hesitate, be it said to their exerlasting renown, both father 
and son, lea\ing their pleasant fireside and risking the \-icissitudes of the great 
Rebellion, each making most creditable records of which their family should 
ever be proud. 

Abraham H. Hernly, well known real estate dealer, was born at Blount 
Joy, Pennsylvania, Jul}* 22. 1843. and is a son of Henry S. and Anna 
Hernly. The father was born on a farm in Pennsyh'ania in 1808, and there 
he grew to manhood and devoted himself to general farming until 1843 
when he moved to Wayne county, Indiana, and in 1844 to Delaware county, 
this state, where he continued to reside until his death in 1868. He was a 
type of the old-time, honest, sturdy, pioneer farmer, who believed in uphold- 
ing the government, fashioned by Washington and other brave and self-sac- 
rificing men. So when the Civil war broke out he gladly gave his services 
to his country, serving faithfully for a period of three years in the Nine- 
teenth Indiana Regiment. He was a Republican, and he belonged to the 
Grand Army of the Republic. His wife was also a native of Pennsylvania, 
born on a farm where she was reared to womanhood, the date of lier birth 
being 1820. Her death occurred in 1856 when in the prime of life. 

Abraham H. Hernly was reared on the home farm in Wayne and Dela- 
ware counties, Indiana, having been a mere babe when he was brought by 
his parents from his birthplace in Pennsylvania. He worked hard assisting 
his father in getting a comfortable home established for the family in the 



MdXTCOMKRV CinXTV. INDIANA. R()(> 

Hoosier state, and that hcint;- the case and public schuols few and jjonrly 
taught in his day lie had \ery little chance to secure an educalinn. hut later 
in life he has made up for this deficiency by wide miscellaneous readinj^ and 
by actual contact with the business world, fiowever. when thirteen years 
of age he returned to his native state to li\-e with a cousin and there went 
to school three winters. When a young man he learned the cabinet-maker's 
trade, becoming very proficient in the same with advancing years. 

When the war between the States came on he laid down his tools and 
hastened to a recruiting station and enlisted in the Twenty-third Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry in which he saw much hard and trying service, but 
he never shirked duty no matter how arduous or dangerous, according to his 
comrades. Among the important battles he took part in were Yorktown, 
seven davs before I'Jicbniond, Malvern Hill, .\ntietani, Crettysburg, Cold 
Harbor, Winchester and Cedar Creek, being under the immortal Sheridan 
at the last two battles. He was on picket duty the day of Lee"s surrender 
at .\pponiatto.x, A'irginia. He was honorably discharged from the ser\ice 
of the Union on July 13, 1865. 

After bis career as a soldier Mr. Hernly returned to Indiana rather 
than the Keystone state from which he had gone to the seat of war. He 
located in Henry county, where he farmed for a few years, getting a new- 
start in life. In 1872 he came to Crawfordsville and here followed the car- 
penters' trade and the contracting business with a large measure of success 
until 1898, when he went into the real estate business, which he has contin- 
ued to the present day, in connection with the loan business, doing nicely in 
both, emioying an ever increasing patronage owing to his honest and cour- 
teous dealings w'ith his fellow men. His residence in Montgomery county 
of over forty years has been marked by duty faithfully performed as a busi- 
ness man and citizen and he has w(jn the regard and confidence of all wlio 
know him. He is an excellent judge of real estate \alues, and he has a num- 
ber of good city rentals. 

Politically, he is a Republican and has been more or less influential in 
local party affairs. Naturally he belongs to McPherson Post, No. 7, C.rand 
Army of the .Republic at Crawfordsville. having long taken an abiding in- 
terest in Grand Army affairs. Fraternally, he belongs to the Imjiroved Or- 
der of Red Men. 

Mr. Hernly was married on December Ji. 1868, selecting as a life- 
partner Emeline Harvey, who was born in Henry county, Indiana, where 
she grew to womanhood and received a common school education. There 



900 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



her parents spent their Hves engaged in fanning. The death of Mrs. Hernly 
occurred on October 21, 1884. To this union four children were born, named 
as follows: Jessie, whose death occurred in 1894; Harry, who died in 1898; 
Kittie is the wife of Clarence Lawler and they live in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia; Lizzie is the wife of Paul Welty, and they are also residents of Los 
Angeles. 

On October 19th, 1892, our subject was married a second time, his last 
wife being Elizabeth Blye, who was a native of Attica, Indiana. To this 
second union one child has been born, Mabel R., who was graduated from 
the Crawfordsville higli school with the class of 1913. 



AMOS GILBERT BREAKS. 

Success lies very largely in whether a man takes an interest in what 
he has mapped out as his life work; unless this is true nothing but mediocre 
success will reward the toiler. Nothing is truer than Longfellow's line in 
"The Building of the Ship," which reads, "For his heart was in his work, 
and the heart giveth grace to every art." A large number of the toilers in 
the tread-mill of existence take only a half-hearted interest, or none, in their 
allotted tasks, feeling none of the zest of the true worker and knowing noth- 
ing of the keen delights of the honest toiler. Among those of Montgomery 
county's men of affairs who take a special delight in their life work is Amos 
Gilbert Breaks, a successful farmer of Crawfordsville, who operates a fine 
farm in L^nion township, nearby. In this township and county Mr. Breaks 
first opened his eyes to the light of day, being a scion of one of our noted 
and sterling old families, and here he grew to manhood, was educated and 
has been content to spend his life. The date of his birth is April 20, 1862, 

Mr. Breaks is a son of John B. and Caroline Jane (Gronnendike) 
Breaks. The father was born on December 14, 1832, in Union township, 
this county, and here he devoted his life successfully to farming, and passed 
to his eternal rest on June 27, 1901. Politically, he v^^as a Republican, and 
in religious matters a Methodist. The mother of the subject of this sketch, 
was also a native of this township and county, the date of her birth being 
June 20, 1836, and was a daughter of Peter and Hannah Gronnendike. The 
ancestors of both these parents were early settlers in this county. Mrs. John 
B. Breaks died on February 17, 1897. She was the mother of ten children. 



MdXTCOMKKY n)lNTV, INDIANA. <)0 1 

three of whom dictl in infancy, those wlio survived being- named as follows: 
John, born October 19. 1855. died in his thirty-ninth year; James, born March 
13, i860, lives at Winona Lake. Indiana: Sarah Ann, died in her tenth year; 
Amos Gilbert, of this review; Ida May. who married Ciiarles E. (liililand, 
was born March 27, 1864; Editli C. who married C. A. Johnson, was born 
on December u;, 1S71. and slie now li\es in San Antonio, 'I'e.xas ; Dr. Liitlier 
Z., of Terre Haute, Indiana, was born on March 5, 1879. 

The paternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was Richard 
Breaks. Sr.. a native of England, w-ho emigrated to America when a }oung 
man, liis voyage to our shores in a sailing vessel requiring two months. He 
came on west and landed at Crawfordsville, Indiana, with just fifty cents in 
his pocket. He found here a frontier settlement of only a few houses, but 
he liked the country and decided to make his future home here, building a 
cabin across the creek from Indian Village. It was many years before he 
saw the first railroad liuilt into Crawfords\-ille and the country round aliout 
cleared of its vast forests and de\eIoped into a fine farming comnuuiity, and 
he took no small part in the upbuilding of the same. He used his influence to 
such improvements as the Iniilding of the first gravel road through the county. 
Coming as he did from a poor family, Richard Breaks, Sr.. had no time for 
education. However, he was the possessor of much of the characteristic 
pluck and energy and he succeeded in his life work and. by close observation 
and wide reading, he became a well informed man. He at first found em- 
ployment with old Andy Johnnie Beard, then head of the Blind Asylum. 
The young Englishman first began as a farm hand, but later had practical 
charge of the entire farm. He was later married to a daughter of his em- 
ployer. Hannah Beard. Subsequent!}-, he was a1)le to ])urchase a small 
farm of his ow-n north of Crawfordsville, at a very lnw figure, and he moved 
his young wife to this place, which has since been known as the Breaks neigh- 
borhood. Indians were quite plentiful in those early days, and although Mr. 
Breaks was on friendly terms with them, he gave them to understand that 
they were not to go near his home in his absence. He was small of stature, 
but the red skins were able to read in his eye the fact that he was a man of 
courage and it were better to respect his wishes. By hard and honest efiforts 
he forged ahead. He cleared his place and established a good home, adding 
to his land from time to time as he prospered through his indomitable in- 
dustry, until he became one of the leading farmers of the community and at 
the tinie of his death was considered in very comfortable circumstances. 

Richard Breaks, Sr.. was married tiiree limes. After the death of his 



902 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

first wife, Hannah Beard, he married Mary Stine, a native of this section of 
Indiana, of which her father, John Stine. was a pioneer. After her death 
on the Breaks farm here, Mr. Breaks was united with Eliza King in the 
bonds of wedlock. 

After replacing the old house with a large, substantial dwelling and add- 
ing a number of convenient buildings and making many other improvements, 
Mr. Breaks settled down on his farm to enjoy the fruits of his labors of 
former years. His extensive landed estate was gradually lessened by virtue 
of the fact that he gave each of his children eighty acres of land at the time 
of their marriage. Here he continued to reside quietly until he was called 
to his eternal rest at a very ripe old age, after a successful and honorable 
career. He was loved and respected by all, having been an honest, hospitable 
and upright man in every respect. 

To the first union of Richard Breaks, Sr., and wife were born six chil- 
dren, of whom the following are named : Sarah, who married Peter Garner, 
is deceased; Anna is the wife of Jacob Miller; Hannah is now Mrs. Jonathan 
Everett ; John B. was the father of Amos G. Breaks, the immediate subject 
of this article. The children of Mr.^ Breaks and his second wife were four 
in number and named as follows: Richard, Jr., long a well known fanner 
of this county, is now deceased ; Harrison was next in order ; Calvin's name 
then appears on the list; and Thomas, the youngest, is deceased. To the 
third union of the senior Breaks and wife was born only one child, Alvin, a 
sketch of whom appears on other pages of this work. 

Amos G. Breaks, our subject, worked on the home farm, there remain- 
ing until he was capable of managing a farm of his own. He has followed 
general agricultural and stock raising pursuits all his life and has met with a 
large measure of success, having inherited the skill as a husbandman and also 
the energy to cany it out effectively from his father and grandfather before 
him. He, however, retired from farming on a large scale some eight years 
ago, and moved into the city of Crawfordsville where he owns a pleasant 
and substantial home and here he is still residing, but has continued to oper- 
ate his farm in a general way. It lies in Union township and consists of one 
hundred and fifty-three acres, well improved in every respect and highly 
productive. 

Politically, Mr. Breaks is a Republican. He belongs to the Methodist 
church, and is a Mason, attaining the Ivnights Templar degrees in that Order. 

Mr. Breaks was married on March 5, 1885 to Mary Elliot, daughter of 
William and Maria Elliot, an early pioneer and honored family of Mont- 



MOXTC.OMKRY COrNTV, INDIANA. 903 

1,'omery county. Mr.s. Breaks was horn in Ripley townsliij), this county, and 
here she grew to womanliood and receixed a common .school education. 

To the union of our sul)ject and wife one child was horn. \'irginia M., 

the (late df her l;irth hein.^^ X(i\enil)fr. igoC). She is in tlic local .ynule schools. 



JOSh:PH (iOLDBERG. 

The most elahorate history is perforce a merciless ahridgment, the his- 
torian being obliged to select his facts and materials from manifold details 
and to marshal them in concise and logical order. This applies to specific 
as well as generic history, and in the former category is included the interest- 
ing and important department of biography. In every life of honor and use- 
fulness there is no dearth of interesting situations and incidents, and yet in 
summing up stich a career as that of Joseph Goldberg, one of the leading busi- 
ness men of Crawfordsville and one of the best known and most successful 
dealers in hides and furs in the Middle West, the writer needs touch only 
on the more salient facts, giving the keynote of the character and eliminating 
all that is superfluous to the continuity of the narrative. Mr. Goldberg has 
led an active, useful and honorable life, not entirely \'oid of the exciting, but 
the more prominent have been so identified with the useful and practical that 
it is to them almost entirely that the writer refers in the following paragraphs. 

Mr. Goldberg was born in Poland, .\pril 5, 1852. His parents both 
died in the old country. His father was a farmer, tanner and contractor, 
and, being industrious and a good manager, had a \ery comfortable income, 
and a good home. 

Joseph Goldberg spent his boyhood in his native land and there receixed 
his early education, which has been greatly su])plemente(l later in life by con- 
tact with the business world and by extensive home reading. When a young 
man he left Poland in order to escape military serA-ice, which was enforced 
1>\- the Russians, our subject being very much opposed to the military sys- 
tem. The trip was a tedious one, and he was sixteen da}s on the water. 
He landed in Xew York City with twenty-five cents in his jiocket, but he had 
plenty of grit and ambition, and he was soon working for a friend for one 
dollar and fifty cents per day. After working two weeks, during which time 
he had saved enough to defray his expenses to Chicago, he made his way 
thither and worked there six months, then purchased a horse and wagon and 
drove to E\'ansville, Indiana, and remained there for two years engaged in 



904 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the jiink business. On account of the disagreeable chmate of Evansville he 
drove to IndianapoHs where he spent thirteen years, very successfully engaged 
in business, then came to Crawfordsville, and established his present business 
which has rapidly grown with the years. He has shipped two million pounds 
of hides, furs, pelts of all kinds, and is one of the best known dealers in this 
line in the country, shippers sending their hides and furs to him from remote 
parts of the country, and the fact that a great many of his regular shippers 
have remained with him for years, refusing to ship to any one else is sufficient 
proof of his honest treatment, his sound business judgment, and his uniform 
courtesv. He undertands thoroughly every phase of his business and no bet- 
ter judge of the value, grades, and varieties of furs and hides could be found. 
He is deserving of great credit for what he has accomplished in the face of 
obstacles, having started with nothing and had no one to aid him. 

Mr. Goldberg was married on March 10, 1875 to Setty Hart, of Indi- 
anapolis, and to this union four children were born, one of whom is deceased ; 
the living are: Fannie, who married Morris Block, of Oskosh, Wisconsin; 
Hannah, who is the wife of Edward Epstine, of St. Paul, Minnesota : Harry, 
who is at home, is in partnership with his father in business. 



JAMES A. VAIL. 

One of the best remembered and most highly respected citizens of Mont- 
gomery county in a past generation, who, after a successful and honorable 
career, have taken up their journey to that mystic clime, Shakespeare's "undis- 
covered bourne, from whence no traveler e'er returns," leaving behind him a 
heritage of which his descendants may well be proud — an untarnished name — 
was James A. Vail who grew up in this locality when the early settlers, of 
whom his father, was one, were redeeming the rich soil from the primordial 
state, and here he played well his role in the drama of civilization. He was a 
man of industry and public spirit, willing at all times to do his full share in 
the work of development, never neglecting his larger duties to humanity, being 
obliging and neighborly, kind and genial, which made him popular with all 
classes and won the respect and good will of those with whom he came into 
contact. Thus for many reasons we are glad to give his personal biography 
a place in the history of his locality. 

Mr. Vail was born on November 22, 1847, at Oak Hill, Indiana. He 
was a son of James and Martha A. (Clevenger) Vail. The father was one 



MOXTCOMICKV 



905 



of the early settlers of Montgomery county and he hecanii' well estal)]isiie(l 
here through his industry. He located near what is now ( )ak llill when this 
locality was very sparsely settled. 

James A. Vail grew to manhood on the lionie farm and tliere he worked 
hard when a boy, and he received his education in tiie comnujn .schcjois of 
his neighborhood, and when a young man he took up general farming for a 
livelihood which he followed all his life with much success, on a large scale, 
owning a finely inipro\ed farm, and he paid ])articular attention to stock rais- 
ing, preparing large numl)ers of cattle and hogs for the market. He had a 
commodious home and was one of the substantial men of in's neiglihorli 1. 

.Mr. \'ail was married on October 31, 1872, to Amanda L. lUue. d;iugli- 
ter of John M. and INlary Ann (Smith) Blue, a highly respected and well 
known couple. .\ complete sketch of the Blue family is to be found on an- 
other page of this work under the caption of James Blue. The following 
children were born to John AI. Blue and wife; Amanda L.. wife of our sub- 
ject; Martin is deceased; Anna married Frank Royer: and James. 

l-"i\e children were born to James A. Vail and wife, namely: Martha .\. 
who married Matt Barton, lives in Madison township; John I*". li\-es in Lin- 
den, this county; .\rthur A. lives in Madison township; Elizabeth married 
Samuel Mnrdock, of Union township; Bessie Katherine married Charley 
Blacketer and they li\e in Aladison township. 

Politically, Mr. Vail was a Republican, but was ne\-er especially acti\e 
in public affairs. He belonged to the New Light Christian church and was 
faithful in his support of the same. Fraternally, he belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, both at Linden. 

The fleath of James A. \'ail occurred on .\pril 16. 1912. 



RYLAXD T. EROWX. 

In the decades preceding and following the War of the States, and dur- 
ing that internecine strife, the state of Indiana produced a brilliant coterie of 
men who became prominent in national affairs, men of various walks and 
professions, of creeds and convictions, who succeeded in stamping the in- 
delible impress of their personalities upon their generation. One of these 
was Ryland T. Brown, who made his mark in the ministry, in the realm of 
medicine and in the field of chemistry, attaining such proficiency and eminence 
m the latter that he was raised to the exalted position of chief chemist of the 



906 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA 

Agricultural Department at Washington, under President Garfield. He was 
a man of sterling attributes of head and heart, a profound scholar and un- 
swerving patriot, and a man who eminently deserved his large success and 
honor, and biographical memoir of such a worthy character must needs 
enhance very greatly the value of a work of the province assigned to the one 
in hand. He was well known to many of the readers of the same, and was 
the father of Capt. George R. Brown, one of Crawfordsville's leading citizens. 

Mr; Brown was born October 5, 1807. in Lewis county, Kentucky. His 
ancestors, on both sides of the house, were originally from Wales. His par- 
ents were exemplary members of the Baptist church, his father being noted 
as a leader in the singing exercises of the congregation. Both the families 
from which he was descended were remarkable for their longevity. In the 
spring of 1809 his father removed to Ohio, and settled near New Richmond, 
in Clermont county, when that country was a wilderness. But there our sub- 
ject enjoyed good educational advantages for those days. He was not a 
robust lad and his parents shielded him from the hard work of the farm, and 
did all in their power to gi^'e him a good education, and he made rapid prog- 
ress. His teacher was not only an able Yankee scholar, but a zealous Bap- 
tist, who did not neglect the moral and religious training of those under his 
charge, and his lessons sank deep into the heart and mind of young Brown; 
and this together with the counsel and example of his pious parents, de- 
termined the direction of the whole current of his subsequent life. 

Early in 1821 his father removed to Indiana and settled in what is now 
the southeastern part of Rush county. But three years before, that country 
was ceded to the United States by the Delaware Indians and it was only in a 
few places that the trees had been removed from what had been their hunting 
grounds. Here the delicate young student was transferred from the con- 
finement and exhaustive toil of the school room to the invigorating labors, 
hardships, and privations of a backwoods life. For the first few years after 
removing to Indiana, he was employed much of the time as guide to land- 
hunters. In this employment he not only became an expert woodsman and 
a second Nimrod, or "mighty hunter," but here also he began to form the 
active habits, and to acquire the fondness for out-door pursuits, for which he 
was distinguished through subsequent life. The change of occupation also 
contributed greatly to his physical development. In the spring of 1822, 
being then in his fifteenth year, he made a profession of faith in Christ, was 
immersed and united with a Baptist congregation, known as the "Cliffy 
church." He had no further oportunity of attending school, but devoured 



MONTCOMKRV COrNTY, INDIANA, <)OJ 

all the hooks he could hnii. He was of that type wliich did w<{ need to he 
taught; all he asked was the means ot' learniiiL;. in the tall n\ 1S23 his 
father died. It was this sad e\ent that directed the mind i>f the son to the 
study of diseases and remedies, and determined his ])rofession for life. In 
1826 he became a Reformer, though fdrmerly a loyal liaijtisl. I'ur ii\er three 
years he devoted his attention exclusively to the study of medicine. His 
knowledge of this suhject, as well as others, was principally acipiired without 
a master; and but few men who ha\e attained to equal eminence in the pro- 
fession have c|ualified themsehes under greater difficulties. Out of the 
bones of an Indian exhumed near his father's farm he constructed an im- 
perfect skeleton, to aid him in the study of anatomy and physiology. Dur- 
ing the latter twenties he attended the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, 
from which he was graduated in the spring of 1829. Returning to Rush 
county in search of a location for the practice of his profession he found a 
stir among the churches, in which he took a prominent part, and he was 
selected as the first victim in the state to he sacrificed on the altar of sectarian 
bigotry. He was arraigned on the \ery general charge of "being a Campbell- 
ite," and. as such, was excluded from the church. In May. 1830 he joined 
the church then organized at Little I'dal Rock, known as the Church of 
Christ, which was destined to become in a few years and remain for many 
years one of the largest and most influential in the state, and in it Dr. Brown 
did a great work. 

Having in 1829 married Mary Reeder. he. in the summer of 1S32. 
located at Connersville, Fayette county, there to establish himself in the prac- 
tice of medicine. Here he had to cotnpete with old and experienced ])hy- 
sicians under many disadvantages, not the least of wiiich was his religion. 
The Reformation of the nineteenth century was then and there known only 
in caricatures of a prejudiced puljiit. and to he simply a disci])le of the 
Lord Jesus, without being identified with any orthodox sect, was looked upon 
as evidence of great ignorance or imi)iety. and was therefore a great re- 
proach. But Dr. Brown was not the man to deny the faith for the sake of 
popularity or financial success. Both publicly and privately he proclaimed 
"all the words of this life," without regard to his own reputation or pecuni- 
arv interests. By close attention to business, and a manly advocacy of the 
truth, he was soon well respected in both his professions. The people 
favored him with a liberal patronage and. what was far more gratifying to 
him, thev gladly received the word and were ba])tized. .SlnU out of the 
orthodox churches he made a sanctuarv of the court-house, in which he soon 



908 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

held a revival meeting. In January, 1833, the Church of Christ was organ- 
ized in Connersville, by Dr. Brown, assisted by Elder O'Kane. From this 
time until the year 1842, he preached extensively through the White Water 
country: and his name is identified with the early history of many churches 
in that region. By these labors and his arduous duties as a physician, his 
health was so impaired that he abandoned the practice of medicine, but con- 
tinued his work in the church. At the state meeting held at Connersville, 
in June, 1842, he was one of four who were appointed to labor throughout 
the state in behalf of this church, but he was later forced to resign on account 
of failing health. In the spring of 1844 he located at Crawfordsville, Mont- 
gomery county, and resumed the practice of medicine in connection with 
preaching. For years past he had devoted his leisure hours to the improve- 
ment of his education — especially to the study of natural science; and his 
residence in Crawfordsville he made equivalent to a regular course in college. 
Wabash College being located at that place, he was admitted to a free use 
of its library, which was extensive, for those days, and also its philosophical 
apparatus. This golden opportunity he improved so well that in 1850, he 
received from that institution the honorary degree of Master of Arts, and 
it was justly merited. 

In 1854 he acted as state geologist, by the appointment of Governor 
Wright, who differed in politics, and was therefore not iilfluenced in the 
selection, hv partisan considerations. In this capacity Dr. Brown traversed 
almost every nook and corner of the state, finding, 

"Books in the running brooks. 

Sermons in stones, and good in everything." 

In 1858 he was elected to the chair of natural science in the Northwest- 
ern Christian University, now Butler College, at Indianapolis, to which place 
he removed in August of that year. There he continued to reside, dis- 
tinguished as an instructor, and indefatigable as a preacher. Later he be- 
came chemist in the Indiana Medical College at that city. Although ad- 
vanced in age, his work as a chemist was so superior to that of his contem- 
poraries that he was selected as chief chemist of the Agricultural Depart- 
ment at Washington, D. C, under President James A. Garfield, in 1881, 
which responsible position he held in an eminently creditable and acceptable 
manner. 

After his retirement frgm the active duties of life he lived quietly in 
his home in the capital of the Hoosier state, enjoying his books and individual 



AlOXTC.OMERV COIXTV, INOIAN'A. gOQ 

research work, until four or Ihe years later when he was summoned to his 
eternal rest in Alay, 1890. full nf honors anil of years, like a sheaf fully 
ripened. He had done a nohle work and his career was an enviahle one, 
frjaught with great good to humanity. In all his lahors, whether as physician, 
geologist, or professor, he almost in\arial)l\- devoted the first day of the week 
to the ministr)' of the word. Having thus performed double duty, he was 
counted worthy of double honor. He was also among the first, and was 
ever among the most zealous, advocates of the Temperance Reform, not only 
in Indiana, but in other states of the Union. He traveled extensively as a 
public lecturer on that subject, and ior years he stood at the head of the 
temperance organization in his state. He preached the whole of the apostle's 
doctrine — "roughteousness, temperance and judgment to come." 

Though he was never a candidate for office he took an active part in 
politics. True to his convictions of riglit and duty he acted with the Free 
Soil party in the latter forties when it seemed to lie a hopeless minority. He 
was stigmatized as an abolitionist even before that term assumed an applica- 
tion so general as to include almost every good and loyal citizen. Although 
he was firmly opposed to slavery he denied the right of the general govern- 
ment to abolish it in the states. For many years he exerted no inconsiderable 
influence through the medium of the press, many learned and entertaining 
articles appearing in the various journals of his day, on religious, educa- 
tional, agricultural, medical and political sul)jects, all being very ably and 
skillfully handled, in all of these movements being somewhat ahead of his 
times. It is not extraxagant to say that had he been properly educated and 
introduced to nature in early life, he might hax'e riwiled .\gassiz or lluniholt 
in the number and value of his scientific achievements. He was familiar 
with all branches of learning, and while his knowledge of books was profound 
and general it was said of him that he knew more of nature than of books. 
He was fully abreast of the times in political and other current questions. 
Nothing was so minute as to escape his attention. As a speaker he ranked 
above mediocrity, having a pleasant voice of great compass, which he em- 
ployed in elocjuence and earnestness. In society and in public, in the sick 
room and at home, he was, like Brutus, "a ])lain. bhmt man," yet he was kind 
and hospitable, and sufficiently affable. Fie possessed an indomitalile will, 
and was noted for great decision of character. He was of that class of 
men who sufifer — not only reproach, but martyrdom, if need be. for their 
religion or cherished principles. He was a man of remarkable active habits. 
And he found time to work his garden and tend his plants e\ery year, delight- 



giO MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ing in out-door labor. He was often known to walk ten miles to preach or 
perform some needed service. He receixed much attention everywhere from 
the press and the peojile. A \'ery eulogistic biography of him appears in a 
popular book of a half century ago, "Pioneer Preachers of Indiana," by 
Madison Evans, published in Philadelphia in 1862. He was described 
at that time, "The burden of his years is light upon him; and his present con- 
dition and appearance, the poet Cowper has well described in the following 
lines : 

"A sparkling eye beneath a wrinkled front 

The vet'ran shows, and, gracing a gray beard 

With youthful smiles, descends toward the grave 

Sprightly, and old almost without decay." 



WALTER F. HULET. 

A man of tireless energy and indomitable courage is Walter F. Hulet, 
one of the well known business men of Crawfordsville, Montgomery county, 
who, by the proper exercise of those talents and qualities which have been 
carefully cultivated from his boyhood, has reached a position in the public 
mind which insures him of the good will and respect due a man of his attri- 
butes. His record is pre-eminently entitled to a careful study, not only on 
the part of the student of biography, but also of every citizen who, guided by 
his example would in the present build wisely for the future. In studying 
a clean-cut, sane, distinct character like that" of Mr. Hulet, interpretation fol- 
lows fact in a straight line of derivation. There is small use for indirection 
or puzzling. His character is the positive expression of a strong nature. 

Mr. Hulet was born on September 2y, 1854, in Putnam county, Indiana, 
where he spent his early childhood, being eleven years of age when he re- 
moved with his parents to Montgomery county in 1865. He is a son of John 
and Louisa (Johnston) Hulet. The father was born on April 12, 1815, at 
Maysville, Kentucky, from which place he moved to Putnam county, Indiana, 
when a boy. His death occurred in 1911. The mother of our subject was 
born in 1820 in North Carolina, and her death occurred on December 31, 
1879. She was a strong character, was highly respected, and was an in- 
fluential worker in the Baptist church. 

John Hulet did the work of a man when he was growing up, and he 
assisted in clearing land in Putnam county when a mere bov. In earlv life 



montgome:kv (.ointv, Indiana. (;i i 

he learned the carpenter's trade which he followed in conncctinn with ijcncra! 
farming and stock huying and shipping the rest of iiis life. I lis fainilv con- 
sisted of eight ciiildren, four of whom grew to maturity and two nf tlicni are 
still living; they were named Saraii, Henry L'., James j., all dercascil ; William 
L. is living; Walter F., subject of this sketch; .\nna, Mary and I'lank. all 
deceased. 

Walter F. Hulet grew to manhood on the home farm and there he did his 
share of the work during the summer months and he receix'ed a common 
school education, which was greatly supplemented by the teaching received 
from his mother. 

Mr. Hulet has been twice married, first, in .\ugust. 187S. to Marv Craig, 
who was a native of this county. Her death occurred in i8(jo. To this 
union one child was born, Jennie b'ay, born in iSSj. died the same year. 

On October 15, 1896, Mr. Hulet was married to Aland Cowan, who was 
born in Montgomery county on October 9. 1864. She is a daughter of John- 
athan H. and Mary M. (Jones) Cowan, her mother later marrying Marion 
P. W'olfe. Her father was born in April 26, 1829 and was one of the Union 
sympathizers who started for the front during the Civil war, but died on his 
way to the Southland, on .\pril 15. 1864. His widow, born in 1840 is .still 
li\-ing, making her hume with (lur subject. Mrs. Hulet received a high school 
education. 

To this second union one child was born, Helen, the date of whose birtii 
was August 7, icjoo. She is now attending .school. 

Walter F. Hulet farmed until he was twenty-five years old in iVanklin 
township, this county, assisting in the operation of the two hundred and 
forty acres in the old home place. Leaving the farm he went to California, 
locating at San Jose where he remained three years, then returned to his 
native county and located in Crawfordsville where he worked as dejjuty 
county auditor for a period of seven years, giving a high degree of satisfac- 
tion to all concerned. Later he organized the Crawfordsville Investment 
Bank, a private institution which he made a success, and he also organized 
the Hoosier State Building Association of which he became secretarv. I'or 
a period of six years he was secretary of the Montgomery Countv .\gricui- 
tural Association. He was secretary of the Commercial Club Association. 
He was a member of the building committee which had charge of the con- 
struction of the Masonic Temple in 1901, and at that time he was also a mem- 
ber of the local school board. He gave eminent satisfaction in these positions 
of trust, and he has been very prominent in public affairs. 



912 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

In 1904, Mr. Hulet was made secretary of the Crawfordsville Trust 
Company, which position he is holding at this writing, discharging the duties 
of the same in a manner to reflect much credit upon himself as a man of 
business. He has been very successful in a financial way and is one of the 
substantial men of his city and county. He owns a beautiful and modernly 
appointed home in Crawfordsville, and he has a finely improved and pro- 
ductive farm of two hundred and twenty-four acres, all tillable, well tiled, 
well fenced and on it stands an excellent dwelling and many convenient out- 
buildings. This place lies in Sugar Creek township and is kept rented. Mr. 
Hulet also owns a few business blocks in Crawfordsville. 

Politically, Mr. Hulet is a Democrat, and while he is influential in local 
public afifairs he is not a seeker after political honors. Fraternally, he has 
attained the thirty-second degree of Masonry at Indianapolis. He holds 
membership with the Center Presbyterian church at Crawfordsville. 



JOHN REMLEY. 



The earl)' pioneers of Montgomery county, ha\-ing blazed the path of 
civilization to this part of the state, finished their labors and passed from the 
scene, leaving the country inj possession of their descendants and to others who 
came at a later period and builded on the foundation which they laid so broad 
and deep. Among the former class was the well remembered farmer and in- 
fluential citizen by whose name this biographical memoir is introduced, his 
arrival being among the earliest. His career here was in the first formative 
period, and he did much to develop and advertise to the world the wonderful 
resources of a county that now occupies a proud position among the most 
progressive and enlightened sections of the great Hoosier commonwealth. 
Ulseless to say that John Remley worked hard and honorably earned the 
reputation which he enjoyed as one of the leading farmers and extensi\e land 
owners, and it is also needless to add that he was held in the highest esteem 
by all who knew him, for he threw the force of his strong individuality and 
sterling integrity into making the county what it is and his efforts did not fail 
of appreciation on the part of the local public. His name will ever be in- 
separably linked with that of the community so long honored by his citizenship, 
whose interests could have had no more zealous and indefatigable promoter, 
and his influence was ever exerted to the end that the world might be made 
better by his presence. 



MOXTCOMERV COUNTY, INDIANA. 9I3 

John Reinley was born May 21, 1800, in Lebanon, Ohio. He was twelve 
years old when his father died. When fifteen years old be Ijegan learning 
the tanner's trade, in Delaware, Ohio, paying for the same with a purse which 
he foiiin!, containing fifty dollars. This old purse is now in ix)ssession of bis 
son, Ambrose Keinley, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this wf)rk, and 
is highly prized by him. John Remley spent five years learning his trade at 
the end of which time he worked out by the month until the spring of 1824, 
when he set out 011 foot to western Indiana, where be had dctcrniiiUMl to make 
his future home. He passed through a uunil)er (if cnuntics willmut iK'ing 
nnicii impressed, until he reached Montgomery county, whicli he liked so well 
that be purchased eighty acres west of Craw fonlsville, which land lie selected 
on account of the springs on it, and with a view of establishing a tannery upon 
it some time in the future. After planting three acres of corn he returned 
to Ohio, performing the journe\- on foot as iK-fore. The cane used in making 
this long walk is also in possession of bis sun, .\mbrose. and on it is car\e(l tlie 
date of the journey. 

Mr. Remley resumed working In- the month after his return to ( )hio. and 
on March 3, 1825, he married Sarah McCain, near Lebanon, ()lii(i. Her 
father, James McCain, was a native of Xew jersey, who had removed to ( )hio 
and died there in 1824. Her mother was a native of Kentucky and was known 
in her maidenhood as Ann Dill. She survived until 1X45. The McCains 
were the parents of eleven children. 

After their marriage John Remley and wife returned to Montgomery 
county, Indiana, to make their future home; however, each came by a differ- 
ent way. ^Irs. Remley was accompanied by her uncle, William McCain, and 
two cousins, this party making the journey on horseback in eight days. Mr. 
Remley shipped their goods on a flat boat on the Miami river at Hamilton, 
Ohio, to Terre Haute, this state, walked to the last named city himself and 
there engaged an o.x team to con\ey his possessions to bis homestead, where 
he arranged them in a small log cabin, leu 1)\- twcKc feet, which bad been 
erected by the former owner of the farm. Mr. I\enile\- set to work with a 
will and soon had his place well under way, with crops growing and built a 
more commodious residence, and establi.shed a tan yard, in which he did a 
thriving business until 1850. A few years after settling on his ])lace here 
he built a hewed log house, in 1829, but it caught fire and burned just as it was 
completed. Nothing daunted he then began building a brick house, a large 
substantial one, which the family occupied as soon as finished, and in that 
comfortable home his life was brought to a close on January 2, 1879, after a 



914 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

long, honorable and successful career. He had prospered from the first, had 
added to his holding from time to time until he became the owner of over two 
thousand acres of valuable land. Part of this land and the brick residence is 
now owned by his son David Remley. The father was active and influential 
in public affairs, and politically, was a Whig until the Republican party was 
organized when he transferred his allegiance to that. He was also acti\e in 
church affairs, a member of the Presbyterian church, being an elder in the 
local congregations for a period of more than twenty years. He was known 
for his strict honesty, neighborliness and hospitality and was well liked by all. 
His widow survived many years, attaining an advanced age, and passing away 
on January lo, 1890. They were buried at Oak Hill cemetery. 

Nine children were born to John Remley and wife, eight of whom grew 
to maturity, namely : Elizabeth, who remained on the old home place ; James 
C, who became a farmer near Darlington: John, who began farming near the 
Vandalia station in Crawfordsville ; Ambrose, mentioned in this work, is farm- 
ing near Crawfordsville; Daniel, for many years a successful farmer and stock 
man in this county, is now living in Crawfordsville. and a sketch of him is to 
be found in another part of this work : David is still living on the old home- 
stead, as mentioned above: Ruhama W'., died at the age of twenty-five years. 



BYRON RANDOLPH RUSSELL. 

The name of B\ron Randolph Russell needs no introduction to the people 
of Montgomery county, for he has long laeen one of the most familiar figures 
on the streets of Crawfordsville, where he is known as a man of business 
ability, public-spirit and honorable character, hence has always had the 
friendship of all who know him, and, during his long life here he lias been 
of much assistance in the general development of the community. 

Mr. Russell was born in White county, Indiana, July 11, 1848, and he 
is a son of Arthur and Lydia (Waymire) Russell. The father was a manu- 
facturer in Monticello and had an interest in the woolen mills at Younts- 
ville which he purchased in 1857. His wife died in 1852 and he later mar- 
ried Mrs. Rhoda Gilkey, who was a daughter of Dan Yount, the founder of 
Yountsville. The death of Arthur Russell occurred on January i, 1858, 
and our subject made his home with his step-grandfather until he was fifteen 
years of age. On July 11, 1863, when but a mere boy, he showed his cour- 
age by enlisting for service in the Uiiion army, as a private in Company G, 



MONTCO.M EUV COl'XTV, 



Sixty-third Indiana \"okintcer Infantry. A part of his regiment was in 
the army of tlie Potomac under General Porter, then in the Twenty-third 
Army Corps under General Schofield, in Sherman's amiy. He took part in 
the East Tennessee campaign, fought at Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville, and 
other important engagements, including that at Fort Fisher, North Carolina. 
He was then transferred to the One Hundred and Twenty-Eighth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry. He was for some time in the hospital at Greensljoro, 
North Carolina, with the typhoid fever. At the time of his honorable dis- 
charge on June 22. 1S65, he was orderl)- to the (]i\isi(_)n surggon. .\ccord- 
ing to his comrades he was a most efficient and fearless soldier and his rec- 
ord as such is a most commendable one. 

After returning home he took a course in \\'abash College, then studied 
law under the distinguished Lew Wallace, later taking a law course in the 
University of Michigan, where he made a splendid record and from which 
institution he was graduated with the class of iSjj. He returned to Craw- 
fordsville and became a partner in the practice of his profession with the late 
Judge E. C. Snyder, which partnership lasted a year and a half, then prac- 
ticed alone for a period of eight years. He lias always enjoyed a lucrative 
practice and is one of the best known and most successful attorneys in the 
county. 

Ha\-ing e\er manifested an aljiding interest in public affairs. Mr. Rus- 
sell was elected on the Repuljlican ticket as justice of the peace, and in 1896 
was elected mayor of Crawfordsville, serving two terms in a manner that 
reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all 
concerned. During that period he did much for the permanent good of the 
place. It was during his administration that the city water works were com- 
pleted, he having been very active in this work: also the fir.st fire dei)artment 
system was perfected. Thus ha\ing been for many years \ery active in all 
that affects the welfare of his cit}" he is deserxing of much credit. He was 
secretaiy of the first building association formed in Crawfords\ille and 
through it the present opera house was built. 

Mr. Russell is now in ])artnership with Gaxiord McCleur. as attorneys, 
real estate dealers, abstractors, etc.. and tliey enjoy an extensive and rapidly 
growing business. 

Mr. Russell is a member of the Knights of I'ytbias, lielongs to McPher- 
son Post, Grand Army of the Republic, having held all the offices in the same. 
He has long been verv' active in the ranks of the Republican party. Per- 
sonally, he is popular, being a good mixer and genial in his nature. 



9l6 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

On October i, 1874. Mr. Russell was married to Sylvia E. O'Neal, 
a daughter of Abijah and Hellen O'Neal, a well known family of Younts- 
ville, Indiana, having been early settlers there. The death of Mrs. Russell 
occurred in June, 1905. 



CHARLES V. HODGKIN. 

It is a well authenticated fact that success comes not as the caprice of 
chance, but as the legitimate result of well applied energy and unflagging 
determination in a course of action once decided upon by the individual. 
Only those who diligently seek the goddess Fortuna, find her — she never was 
known to smile upon the idler or dreamer. Charles Van Dake Hodgkin, the 
present trustee of Union township, Crawfordsville, and for years a success- 
ful business man of Montgomery county, early understood that success comes 
only to those who work diligently and honorably, so he did not seek any royal 
road to success, but sought to direct his feet along the well-beaten paths of 
those who had won in the battle of life along legitimate lines. He had their 
careers in mind when casting about for a legitimate line to follow, and in 
tracing his life history it is plainly seen that the prosperity which he enjoys 
has been won by commendable qualities, and it is also his personal worth 
which has gained for him the good standing among his fellow citizens in 
Montgomery county, in which he has spent his active life and is well known. 

Mr. Hodgkin was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, on July 25, 1848. He 
is a son of Edward C. and Diana (Scott) Hodgkin, an excellent old family, 
a complete sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume, hence will not 
be necessary to repeat same here. 

Charles V. D. Hodgkin, recei\'ed a fairly good education in the common 
schools and in Russellville College, in Putnam county, Indiana, and when 
nineteen years of age he started to learn carpentering, and a year later took 
up railroad carpentering which he continued one year. For the next four- 
teen years he was contractor and builder at Russellville, and did a large 
business, many of the best buildings in the vicinity of that place standing as 
monuments to his skill and honesty as a builder. He then turned his atten- 
tion to the grain business which he followed with equal success for a period 
of thirteen years, during which period he was regarded as one of the lead- 
ing men in this field of endeavor in western Indiana. During that time he 
was elected trustee of Russell township, Putnam county, and served five 



MOXTHO.MKKV COl-NTY. INDIANA. 9I7 

years, to the satisfaction of all concerned. He came to Craw fonlsville in 
1898, and continued the grain business in partnership with W. M. Darter, 
under the firm name of Darter & Hodgkin. He sold out a year later, and 
engaged in the real estate and loan business here for three years, enjoying 
a good business. He then went to Indianapolis where he remained eighteen 
months in the grocery and meat business. He then returned to Crawfords- 
ville and was elected township trustee, which office he has since held, with 
entire satisfaction of all concerned, and is looking after the interests en- 
trusted to him most faithfully. 

Mr. Hodgkin is a Republican politically. He t>elongs to the Knights 
of Pythias, and he is a memlx^r of the Christian church. 

He was married in October. 1886 to Martha J. .\lexander. a native of 
Putnam county, and to this union one child, a son, was born, Edward F. 
Hodgkin. who is connected with his father in business. 



CHARLES GOHMAN. 

Montgomery county has furnished comfortable homes for many of the 
enterprising citizens hailing from the great German Empire, who have been 
settling within her borders since the early pioneer days when the great 
Wabash Valley was still the haunts of \arious tribes of Indians, the Potto- 
watomies. Kickapoos. Weas and the Miamis. and this forested country was 
also the home of all varieties of wild creatures common to this latitude. 
We have always welcomed the Germans, and this has been as it should l>e, 
for they have been courageous and not afraid of hard work and ha\e been of 
untold assistance to us in clearing the heaving forests of beech, oak. elm and 
ash, and they, too, have helped not only to develop the wild land into good 
farms, but also to build our substantial dwellings, comfortable barns and 
imposing business and public buildings. Few of these visitors from that 
alien land had any capital when they arrived, at least very little, not enough 
to be of much consequence: but they didn't need much, for they were strong 
in body and mind and did not hesitate at obstacles, and thus in the course 
of time they attained a competency and a position of influence in the locality 
which they selected. 

One of the families from the Fatherland who has played well their part 
in the industrial affairs of Montgomery county is the Gohmans. a well known 



9l8 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

member of which is Charles Gohman, the popular liveryman of Crawfords- 
ville, he being of the second generation of his family in this country. 

Our subject was born near Ladoga, Montgomery county, on October 19, 
1884. He is a son of Theodore and Sarah B. (Reep) Gohman. The father 
was born in Germany in August, 1852, and in 1858, when six years old, his 
parents brought him to the United States. The family came on west, locat- 
ing in Montgomery county and here the old people spent the rest of their 
lives, and Theodore grew to manhood, received some education in the country 
schools, and when a young man took up farming for a livelihood and this he 
followed with much success all his life, dying on February 14, 1910. His 
widow is still living, making her home south of Crawfordsville. 

Charles Gohman grew to manhood on the home farm and there assisted 
with the general work when a boy. He received a good common school edu- 
cation. He followed in the footsteps of his father in the matter of vocation 
and continued farming with gratifying results until 19 10 when lie purchased 
a livery and feed barn on East Market street. Crawfordsville. and here he 
has remained, enjoying a large business. He keeps twenty head of good 
horses, a splendid equipment of buggies, harness and everything that goes 
to make up a modern livery barn, and prompt service is his aim. He carries 
a complete line of feed and does a large business in the same. 

Mr. Gohman was married in January, 1906, to Bertha Pointer, a native 
of Boone countv, where she grew to womanhood and received her education. 
She is tlie (laughter of Thompson and Mary (Furgeson) Pointer, of Boone 
countv, her father being a farmer. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Gohman has 
been without issue. 

Fraternally, Mr. Gohman is a member of the Patriotic Order Sons of 
America and the Tribe of Ben-Hur. Politically, he is a Democrat. 



DR. CHARLES W. GRANTHAM. 

It is as necessary to have our horses and other valuable stock looked 
after from a standpoint of health as it is to furnish them with proper feed 
and shelter, for while dumb animals escape many of the multiform ills which 
beset humanity because they do not break so many laws as we. yet they, 
through man's carelessness, brutality and various untoward circumstances, 
become deranged in muscle, blood and bone, and, if not properly attended to, 
must continue to suffer until death comes to their relief. So we must have 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 9I9 

veterinary physicians, and there is a constantly increasing demantl for their 
services. The old-fashioned "horse-doctor" knew but little of the anatomy, 
even, of the horse, and his heroic methods often caused the animals more 
suffering and did no good; but during the past decade or so there has been 
noted a great advancement in the science of veterinary surgery, and there are 
great institutions in several of the large cities where this science is tauglit, the 
would-be practitioner not being permitted to try his skill or lack of skill on 
the domestic animal until he is thoroughly prepared and finished a rigid 
course of training. 

One of the most adroit, up-to-date and successful veterinary physicians 
of Montgomery and adjoining counties is Charles W. Grantham, of Craw- 
fordsville, a native of the county and well known throughout the same. 

Dr. Grantham was born at Ladoga, this county, October 13, 1872. He 
is a son of W^esley and Caroline (Miller) Grantham. The father was born 
in North Carolina in 1833, and when a boy he made the long overland jour- 
ney from the old Tar state to Washington county, Indiana, accompanied by 
his parents. There they established their home in that county when it was 
yet litle improved and sjiarscly settled and there they became very comfort- 
ably established through hard work, and there the parents spent the rest of 
their lives. There Wesley Gantham grew to manhood and remained there 
until the latter fifties when he removed to Montgomery county and settled 
on a farm, which he developed to a state of productiveness that e(|uale(l any 
in his locality and there he spent the rest of his life, remaining on the sanie 
farm for nearly a half century, his death occurring here in 1903. He was a 
man of honorable impulses and was well known and liked by everybody. 

i\Irs. Grantham was a daughter of James and Nancy (Lee) ^Miller, 
natives of Kentucky, fnjm which state they came in an early day and settled 
in Walnut township, this county. The death of Mrs. Wesley Grantham oc- 
curred in 1892. 

Charles W. Grantham grew to manhood at Ladoga and there received a 
good education in the common schools and in the Normal, graduating from 
the latter in 1890. He then entered the Ontario \^eterinary College at 
Toronto, Canada, where he made a splendid record and from which institu- 
tion he was graduated in 1904. 

Thus well prepared for his chosen life work. Dr. Grantham at once 
came to Crawfordsville, Indiana, and opened an oiTice and has since been 
successfullv engaged in the practice of his profession in MontgoiTier\- county, 
building up a large and constantly growing patronage and he has met with 
great success all along the line. 



920 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Politically, he is a Republican, and fraternally belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias. 

Dr. Grantham was married on February 12. 1907 to Sallie Fullen, who 
was born, reared, and educated at Ladoga, where her people have long been 
well known and highly respected. 

To the union of our subject and wife one child, a daughter, has been 
born, bearing the good old name of Caroline. 



SQUIRE RUSK. 



The name of Squire Rusk is a familiar sound to the people of the western 
part of Montgomery county, for there he has long been a resident and has 
become known as one of our most skilful general farmers, being of the older 
type of tillers of the soil, rather than a representative of the new school. He 
has been a very careful obser\-er and is a man of much practical and natural 
ability, and everyone knows that practical experience counts for more than 
what one may learn from books ; this is true in any line, and is perhaps as 
strikingly exemplified in agriculture as in anything, if not more so, conse- 
quently the man who, like Mr. Rusk, has experimented and observed the re- 
sults all his life, is bound to have mastered a great deal in the- science or field 
of endeavor which claims his attention. 

Squire Rusk was born in Wayne township, Montgomery county, Indi- 
ana, July 2, 1834. consequently he may be said to be a link between the 
pioneer epoch and the present, for he grew up amid primitive conditions, and 
helped his father clear and develop the home farm from its wild state, and 
here he has continued to reside, not caring to change the advantages of his 
home community for those of any other, being able to foresee in his youth a 
great future for this section of Montgomery county. He has lived to see great 
changes take place in his vicinity and he has taken no small part in this 
transformation. 

Mr. Rusk is a son of David and Martha (Ball) Rusk, the father having 
been a native of Ohio where he spent his earlier years, coming to Wayne 
township, Montgomery county, Indiana, with his parents in a very early day, 
the family settling in the wilderness. This entire locality was then the home of 
only a few white people who had braved the wilds of the frontier, and the 
Rusks founded the future home of the family in the woods, far remote from 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 92 1 

any center of civilization. Tiiey wurkeil lianl and endured llie hard.ships 
incident to such environment. 

The father of our sul)ject followed farniiny all iii.s life. He was more 
or less active in the affairs of his community, and he served as trustee of 
Wayne township for some time. His family consisted of six children, three 
of whom are still living, making their homes in Montgomery county. 

Squire Rusk was married in 1882 to Julia Grenard, daughter of Jesse 
and Mary (Sayers) Grenard. I'.oth tlie Grenard and Sayers families were 
early settlers in Montgomer\- cnunty. Here Mrs. Rusk grew to womanhood 
and, like her husband, received such education as the early day district schools 
afforded. 

One child has l^een born to our subject and wife. namel\- : lulitli. who 
married Walter Run)an, of Wayne townshi]). 

Politically, Mr. Rusk is a Democrat and has ])een unwavering in his 
allegiance to the party's principles. Religiously, he is a Baptist. He is not 
active politicall}' and has held no offices, preferring to lead a quiet life. 

Mr. Rusk is the owner of a tine farm of four hundred and sixty acres 
of land, mostly in this county, one eighty acre tract l>eing in Fountain county. 
His present modern and attractive home was built by him. Xone of his 
land is worth less than one hundred and fifty dollars per acre. 



HENRY HARRISON CRIST. 

It is doubtful if an American citizen can wear a greater badge of honor 
than the distinction of having served the government in the memorable four 
years of war between the states. It is a sacred family inheritance of renown, 
to be prized like a jewel by all future descendants, and kept bright and un- 
tarnished by other acts of valor, patriotism and loyalty in the interests of 
free government. Even in this day, when there are many of the old soldiers 
living, no one can see them file by with faltering ste])s without feeling a glow 
of pride and without showing them studied deference. This is as it should 
be. One of these is Henry Harrison Crist, one of the venerable and hon- 
ored citizens of Crawfordsville, the major portion of whose active life has 
been passed in Montgomery county, but he has lived retired for' many years. 
He is one of the best known figures on the streets of the county seat and is 
held in high esteem by a very wide acquaintance. 

Mr. Crist was born at Liberty, Union county, Indiana, September 27, 



(^22 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

1836, and he is a son of William B. and Margaret (Lafuse) Crist. The 
father was born in 1814 in Union county, Indiana, and was a son of George 
Crist who was an early settler there. In 1802 the family removed to Union 
county, this state, settling in the very center of the county on one hundred 
and sixty acres and there established a comfortable home through hard work. 
In 1828. William B. Crist and Margaret Lafuse were married, and to them 
twelve children were born, four of whom are living at this writing. 

William B. Crist was a man of much influence in his community, and his 
advice was often sought in various matters by the pioneers. He took a 
great interest in public affairs and served very ably and acceptably as circuit 
judge of Union county three terms, and was supervisor of the poor and com- 
missioner of his county for some time. As a public servant he won the hearty 
commendation of all concerned and did much for the general good of his 
locality. He was an extensive contractor and builder, and employed on an 
average eighteen men, and for a period of about ten years he erected e\'ery 
house in his county. He had charge of the stone work on the Hamilton & 
Dayton railroad when it was constructed in this state. The death of this 
prominent man occurred in 1856, when comparatively young in years. Had 
not his career been cut short by death he would doubtless have become one of 
the leading men of the state. He was active in political affairs, first as a 
Whig and later as a Republican. Something of his public spirit and fine 
character may be gained from the fact that he gave the sum of two hundred 
dollars to every church that was built in Union county during his life time. 
His widow sur\-ived o\-er a half century, dying in 1908 at a \'ery ad\'anced 
age. 

Henry H. Crist received his education in a private school, and when 
young in }-ears he entered business with his father, as booker, first in a hard- 
ware, then a grocery and later a general store. He subsequently learned 
the painter's trade, at which he became an expert and which he followed until 
1861, having come to Crawfordsville in 1859. 

When the Civil war broke out Mr. Crist proved his patriotism by enlist- 
ing in 1 86 1 in the famous Eleventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, — the 
Zoua\'es. — under Col. Lew W^allace, who soon afterward became a briga- 
dier general. Our subject became a noted scout and was in charge of a 
successful scouting party. He went out at the commencement of the war, 
with the three months' volunteers, and at the expiration of his term of enlist- 
ment he re-enlisted, identifying himself with the Sixteenth Indiana Light 
Artillery, in which he served with much credit and faithfulness until the close 



MONTf.DMKRV COUNTY, INDIANA. <)2,S 

of the war, participating in many memorable campaigns and hard-fougiit 
battles, and received an honorable discharge. He was in Washington, D. C. 
at the time of the grand re\iew, and he was in l^'ord's Theater when Presi- 
dent Lincoln was assassinated there. 

Returning to Crawfordsville after the war. Mr. Crist enttTcd the grocery 
business in 1866 which he conducted with great success until 1872, when he 
retired from active lite, and has since lived quietly in his pleasant hmiie in 
Crawfordsville. surrounded by such comforts as go to make one's declining 
years happy. 

Mr. Crist was married on November i, 1866 to Maggie E. Wood, of 
Crawfordsville, but who was a native of Union county, her people being 
well known there. After a happy married life of forty-five years, she was 
called to her rest on November 16, 191 1. 

For some time Mr. Crist served in the city council. Fraternally, he is 
a meml^er nf the Masonic (^rder. the Royal Arch Masnns. Rnxal and Select 
Masters and the .\ncient Free and Accejited Masons, and has long been 
prominent in Masonic circles, having first joined this time-honored order in 
i86t. Politicallv. he is a Progressive, and religiously a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



ALLEN ELWOOD EASTLACK. 

Montgomery county, Indiana, was especially fortunate in the character 
of her pioneers, who, save in rare instances, possessed the pluck, fortitude 
and genius of the true Anglo-Saxon, that race which appears to delight in 
difficulties, because thereby an opportunity is afforded to conquer them, which 
gives zest to their efforts, and this trait, perhaps, more than any other, has 
been responsible for the fact that they have never Ijeen defeated by any other 
race, and have extended tlieir civilization to all parts of the globe. The 
founders of Montgomery county and those who were instrumental in her 
later day development, active alike in public and private affairs were brave, 
strong-amied, far-seeing. God-fearing, law-abiding citizens, patriotic and 
true to their native land, and conscientious in the discharge of their every 
duty toward their fellow men. Of this worthy type of citizens was the East- 
lack familv. of which Allen Elwood Eastlack, of Crawfordsville, is one of 
the best known of the present generation. His parents settled here in the 



924 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

pioneer period and established the permanent home of the family, the repu- 
tation of which has ever been above reproach. 

Mr. Eastlack, of this review, was born in Crawfordsville on June i8, 
1843, 3^"<i he is a son of Samuel and Catherine (Haynes) Eastlack. The 
father was born in New Jersey, and there he spent his boyhood years, com- 
ing to Crawfords\'ille in the early thirties when there was but a handful of 
houses here and country roundabout was but a dense forest in which were a 
few scattering log huts of white settlers. The elder Eastlack was a shoe- 
maker by trade, which he had learned in the East and he at once began fol- 
lowing the same here, his services being in great demand owing to the fact 
that he was a high-grade workman and was honest in his dealings with his 
fellow men. He continued to follow his trade practically until his death. 
Politically, he was a Democrat, and in religious matters a Methodist, and was 
known as a hard-working, neighborly and honorable man. His death oc- 
curred in 1868, and that of his wife in 1867. They were the parents of ten 
children, and Allen E., our subject, is the only living one. 

Allen E. Eastlack grew to manhood in his native town and here re- 
ceived a common school education, and he was merging from boyhood into 
young manhood when the Civil war came on, and on March 22, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company H, Eleventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served 
very faithfully until March 22, 1865, a period of three years, during which 
he saw much hard service and participated in a number of engagements. 

After the war he returned to Crawfordsville, and has since followed the 
shoemaker's trade and in which he became an expert early in life, so that his 
services, like those of his father, has ever been in great demand. He has 
spent most of his active career in his home town, however he followed his 
trade three years in Rushville, three years in Noblesville and several years 
in Waveland. "j 

Mr. Eastlack is a member of McPherson Post, Grand Army of the Re- 
public at Crawfordsville. He is one of the leading members of the local 
Christian church, in which he is deacon and treasurer. Politically, he is a 
Democrat, but has never been an office seeker. 

When he was at home on veteran furlough in April, 1864, he was united 
in marriage to Ann Elizabeth Johnston, of Waveland, where she spent her 
childhood and where her family was long well known. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Eastlack. namely : Foun- 
tain, who is living in Crawfordsville; and Rubertia, who is the wife of Dr. 
H. McMains, a successful physician of Baltimore, Maryland. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



HARRY LEE SCOTT. 



The secret of success in the business affairs of tliis world is, after all, 
knowing how to direct the persistent energy which one expends in whatever 
avenue of endeavor one may select. There are, of course, other potent 
reasons, but they are subordinate, and it takes continuous, hard plodding to 
overtake the coveted goal which one sees in the distance upon starting out. 
Harry Lee Scott, a successful and popular commercial traveler out of Craw- 
fordsville, Montgomery county, where he maintains a pleasant home, has won 
success while yet young in years because lie has worked for it diligently and 
conscientiously, doing the right thing at the right time and never waiting 
for some one else to perform what he himself should do. 

Mr. Scott was Ixirn in Benton county. Indiana, on September lo, 1889, 
and he is a son of William AL and Harriett C. ( Bradley) Scott. The father 
was born January 29. 1844. in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, and his death 
occurred on July jo, 1893. The mother was liom in Virginia on December 
16, 1847, a"<^l her death occurred on December 17, 1905. These ])arents 
received a common school education. William M. Scott was a druggist by 
profession and he maintained a place of business and his home at (J.xford, 
Indiana, where he became well established and favorably known and was 
highly skilled at his line of work. 

Eleven children were born to William M. Scott and wife, eight of whom 
are still living, namely: John W., born September 8. 1866: Sanford S., born 
November 28, 1867; Lizzy W., born September 30, 1869; Anna, born June 
II, 1871 ; Myrtle, born February 18, 1875: Charles A., born March 25, 1881, 
and his death occurred on March 8. 1883: William E., born October 30, 
1882: Elmer B., born October 30, 1882. died April 14, 1883 (he and Wil- 
liam E. were twins); Erma L., April 8. 1884. died June 17, 1906: Marene 
G., born March 7, 1887: and Harry L., subject of this review, who is the 
youngest of the family. 

The subject of this sketch grew in Oxford, this slate and he received a 
good common school education, making an excellent record in the high 
school, subsequently taking a business course. 

Mr. Scott was married on February 18. 1908. to Myrtle B. Wirt, who 
was born October 28, 1886 in Montgomery county, Indiana, and here she 
grew to womanhood and received a good education in the local schools. She 
is a daughter of John P. and Amanda C. ( Myers ) Wirt. The father was 
born on January 2(>. 1852 in this state, and his death occurred on January 



926 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

21, 1908. The mother of Mrs. Scott was born in Fountain county, Indi- 
ana, on January 18, 1853, and she is still living, making her home with our 
subject. John P. Wirt was a merchant at the town of Alamo, this county 
and enjoyed a large business with the surrounding country there, and later 
he moved to Crawfords\'ille where he continued in business with equal suc- 
cess until his death. 

Three children ha\-e been born to John P. Wirt and wife, namely: W. 
W., born November 3, 1878; Fred, born August 23, 1882: and Myrtle B., 
wife of Mr. Scott, of this review. 

The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 

Mr. Scott made his start in life in the west, later returned to Indiana 
and attended the Iles-De A'or Business College at Indianapolis, from which 
he was graduated in 1907 and at that time took a position with the Lehigh 
Portland Cement Company as traveling salesman, his territory being in 
Indiana and he is still with this concern, having given eminent satisfaction, 
being regarded by his employers as one of the most trustworth}' and com- 
petent men, and he has done much to increase the prestige of the company 
in this state. 

Mr. Scott owns a modern and attractive bungalow in Crawfordsville. 

Fraternally, he belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
at Crawfordsville. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
during the last campaign he allied himself with the Progressive party. 



WILLIAM H. JOHNSTON. 

The name of William H. Johnston has long been well known in legal 
circles of western Indiana, where he is a leader of the bar and a progressive 
citizen, a man who stands high with all classes owing to his interest in the 
development of Crawfordsville and Montgomery county, his ability as a law- 
yer and his courtesy and integrity. He is entirely unassuming and a pleasant 
man to know. 

Mr. Johnston was born near Greencastle, Indiana, on June 9, 1858. He 
is a son of Archibald and Sarah ( Keller ) Johnston. The father was born 
in North Carolina on August 28, 1810, and the mother's birth occurred near 
Corydon, Indiana, on August 19, 181 6. Archibald Johnston devoted the 
earlier part of his life to farming, in fact, this continued to be his chief voca- 
tion until late in life, however, much of his time in later years was given 
to public ofifice, he having been for many years prominent in political matters. 



Mo\r(;(i.\ii;K\' tdiNrN-. ixdiana. 927 

He served his locality as state senator and rcpresentalivu tdr eleven sessions. 
He made a most praiseworthy record as a legislator, winning the high esteem 
of his constituents and doing a great work for the Icjcality which he repre- 
sented. He was a leader in Democratic politics, was a forceful and popular 
public speaker, and one of tlie best known men of his day and generation in 
western Indiana. His death occurred on December 30, 1884, at Crawfords- 
ville, whitiicr he iiad mo\ed two years prior to Iiis death. He had owned and 
operated a fine farm in Franklin township, and he carried on general farm- 
ing and stock raising on a large scale. He was a member of the Old School 
Baptist church, and a man of fine character. The death of his wife occurred 
on .\ugust 18, 1900. 

William H. Johnston receixed his early education in the Darlington 
Academy, later entering the L'ni\ersity of Michigan at .\nn .Xrbor. from 
which he was graduated witJi the class of 1S81, from the law department. 
having made an excellent record in the same. 

After his graduation, he came to Crawfords\i!le. Indiana, and entered 
the profession in partnership with his brother. Charles Johnston, antl has 
since been successfully engaged in the general practice, having built up an 
extensive and lucrative clientele. He has kept well abreast of the times in 
all that pertains to his profession, and is what might he ])roperly termed an 
analytical lawyer. He is pain.staking. alert. exhaustiNe. always goes into 
court well prejiared, and has the interests of his clients at heart, lie is a 
logical and earnest pleader and has great weight with juries, and has a good 
record as a winner of cases. 

Mr, Johnston is prominent in politics, a leader in the local affairs of the 
Democratic party, of which he has l)een county chairman, also a member of 
the state committee. He was elected state senator in 1900 and represented 
this county and Putnam in the legislature from that year until 1904 in a 
manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent satis- 
faction of all concerned, irrespective of party alignment, doing much for the 
permanent good of the locality and the state in general. 

Mr. Johnston was married in 1886 to Ella May McMulIen. daughter of 
James \\'. and Julia .\. (Hubbard) McMullen. a well known family of 
Frankfort, Indiana. Mrs. Johnston grew to wdnianhood in and near 
Darlington and attended school at that place, but some time Ix-fore her mar- 
riage moved with her parents to Frankfort, where she was married, and 
where her mother still resides. 

The union of our subject and wife has roulteil in tlie l)irth ni cne child, 
Lois June Johnston Kirkpatrick, living with her husband away from home. 



928 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

GEORGE W. CORN, Sr. 

Among those who came to Montgomery county, Indiana, when the 
country was in its primiti\e wildness, infested by wild animals, numerous and 
ferocious, and when the scarcely less wild, but more savage red men, had not 
long been gone to other hunting grounds, was the Corn family, the pro- 
genitors of the gentleman whose name forms the introduction of this sketch, 
having invaded the wilderness here eighty-six years ago, and from that re- 
mote day to the present time the name has been a familiar sound over this 
locality. They performed well their parts in the work of developing the 
country from the primeval woods to one of the foremost agricultural sections 
in the great Hoosier state, and the elder Corns, together with the other early 
actors in the great drama which witnessed the passing of the old and the intro- 
duction of the new conditions in which are now the fine farms and thriving 
towns of this county are deserving of every consideration. We of today can- 
not pay such sterling characters too great a meed of praise, in view of the 
sacrifices they made in order that their descendants and others of a later day 
should enjoy the blessings of life, only a few of which they were permitted 
to have. 

George W. Corn was born on the farm where he now lives in Section 5, 
Clark township, Montgomery county, February 20, 1841, and here he has 
been content to spend his life. He is a son of Williams and Sarah (Allen) 
Corn. Williains Corn was born in Henry county, Kentucky, February 16, 
1800, and was a son of George and Rhoda Corn. Sarah B. Allen was born 
in Shelby county, Kentucky, August 16, 1799, and in that state she and Mr. 
Corn grew to maturity, received a meagre educational training and were mar- 
ried. They removed to Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1827, at which time 
they had three children, namely: Rhoda Jane, born February 28, 1824; 
Albert, born November 9, 1825, and Elizabeth E., born October 2, 1827, the 
latter an infant, two or three months old. They bought a fann in Section 6, 
Scott township, southeast of what is now the village of New Market, in 1827. 
They found a country little improved. There were lots of deer and wolves. 
Soon after their settlement the father had to return to Kentucky, leaving his 
wife with her small children. The wolves surrounded the house at night and 
with their unearthly howling struck terror to the hearts of the timid inmates. 
Indians, now friendlv to the whites, often went up and down Cornstalk creek 
which touches the land on which this family settled. 

In a1}out two years Williams Corn sold his first place and moved to the 




GEORGP: \V. COllN, SR. 



MdXTC.OMERV COl'NTV, INOIAXA. 929 

present Corn homestead, occupied by our suliject. They Ixiught the eighty 
acres on which the house stands west of the present road, and entered froni 
the government an adjoining eighty, directly east of it, the two eighties com- 
prising the northwestern one-fourth of Section 5. Only five or six acres of 
this second farm had been cleared, and it was enclosed with a brush fence, and 
there had been built a little log cabin near a spring. Here Mr. Corn quickly 
built of hewn logs a larger and more comfortable dwelling, and in 1843 he 
built another and still better house, and in this he and his wife spent the rest 
of their lives. They worked hard and cleared and developed the place and 
became very well fixed as farmers of that early day. 

To Williams Corn and wife were born nine children after they located 
in this county, making their family a large one, twelve in all, with the three 
elder who first opened their eyes to the sky in the Blue Grass state. The ones 
born here were: Xancy A., born October 26, 1829: Mary Ann, born May 14, 
1831 ; ^Margaret D., born May i, 1833: Sarah Eliza, born April 16, 1835; 
John W., born August 12, 1837: William, born July 23, 1838; Stephen A., 
born August 15, 1839; Martha E.. born August 23, 1842; and our subject, 
George \Y. 

The death of Williams Corn occurred on November 11, 1859, having 
been fifty-nine years old the prex'ious Februar}-. He was a hard-working, 
honest man. who preferred to remain at home, never seeking office, although 
loyal in his support of the \\'hig party. He was assisted in his hard work of 
clearing and developing the farm by his older sons and daughters. The good 
wife also worked hard, spun and wove until late in the night to make clothes 
for her children, even George W., the next to, the youngest child, remembers 
well the two linen clothes. But they were a contented famil\- and li\ed as 
comfortably as others in those days hardships. The mother w as called to her 
rest on May 4, 1874. She was a member of the Baptist church. 

The paternal grandfather, George Corn, was a native df Germany, fn )ni 
which country he emigrated to the United States wJien yi>ung and settled in 
the wilds of Kentucky, from which state he enlisted for ser\ ice in the w ar of 
1812, in which he fought as a private. 

Of the twelve children of Williams Corn and wife. George W.. our sul)- 
ject, is the only one living at this writing. He grew up on tJie home farm on 
which he has spent his life. During his more than seventy years" residence 
here he has noted and taken part in great changes, the country round about 
presenting an altogether different aspect from what it did in his early Jioy- 
hood. He did not have an opportunity to receive more than a few years' 
(59) 



930 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

training in the common schools of his district. His mother made her home 
with him during her widowhood years. There were six other heirs of the 
homestead and from time to time he bought their interests until he now owns 
the entire home farm, which contains one hundred and ninety acres, which he 
has kept well improved and carefully tilled so that it has lost none of its old- 
time fertility and productiveness. In 1880 he built the present substantial 
home in which he now resides. General farming and stock raising are car- 
ried on. i 

Mr. Corn was married on December 24, 1863 to Hulda Jane Williams, 
daughter of Bryan and Elizabeth (Castle) Williams. She was born and 
reared in Union township, this county, east of Whitesville. Her paternal 
grandfather, Stephen Williams, came from North Carolina and was a pioneer 
settler in the east part of this county, in an early day, and here established the 
permanent home of the family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Corn had two children, a son who died in infancy and a 
daughter, Valletta Lillian, who is now the wife of William M. Frantz, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this volume. Mr. and Mrs. Frantz live on the 
farm with Mr. Corn. 

The death of Mrs. Corn occurred on September 9, 1905. She was a 
woman of kindly impulses, charitably inclined, unselfish, and had many true 
friends. 

Mr. Corn is a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge. No. 54, at 
Ladoga. He has never striven to be a politician, however, he was nominated 
by the Democrats in 1894 for county commissioner and though defeated with 
his ticket made an excellent race. 



EDGAR A. RICE. 



That the career of such a man as Edgar A. Rice, the former efficient 
and popular incumbent of the office of county clerk of Montgomery county, 
besides being treasured in the hearts of relatives and friends should have its 
public record also, is peculiarly proper because a knowledge of men whose 
substantial reputation rests upon their attainments and character must ex- 
ert a wholesome influence upon the rising generation. While transmitting 
to future generations the brief chronicle of such a life, it is with the hope of 
instilling into the minds of those who come after the important lesson that 
honor and station are sure rewards of individual exertion. He was for a 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 93 1 

number of years one of the popular educators of this locality, and has shown 
himself to be a public-spirited citizen. 

Mr. Rice was Ixirn on February 24, 1877, in Union township, Mont- 
gomery county, Indiana, and he is a son of William A. and Martha E. 
(Hipes) Rice. The father was born on December 29, 1838, in Kentucky, 
from which state he removed to Indiana in 1852, locating in Montgomery 
county where he became well established and well known. His death oc- 
curred on August II, 191 1. The mother of our subject was born on March 
9, 1850, in Virginia, and her parents removed to Indiana when she was a 
child. Thus in this state the parents of our subject grew to maturity, re- 
ceived a meager education in the common schools and here were married, 
and spent their lives engaged in agricultural pursuits. They became the 
parents of seven children, five of whom are still living, namely : James, is 
deceased; Charles, lives in Danville; Henry was next in order; Edgar A., of 
this review ; Bessie, is deceased ; John W. and Clay M. were the youngest. 

Edgar A. Rice grew to manhood in this county and he received a good 
education in the common schools, later attending the Central Normal at 
Danville. Illinois, also the Indiana State Normal in Terre Haute. 

January 5, 1902, he was united in marriage to Ona M. Surface, who 
was born in Illinois on June 16, 1883. She received a common school edu- 
cation, and she was a daughter of Aaron F. and Amanda (Talbert) Surface. 

The following children were born to our subject and wife: Helen E., 
born March 2. 1905, is in school; Meredith, born October 25, 1909. 

Mr. Rice began life as a teacher in the schools of Montgomery countv 
in 1897, following the same with success for several years. In 1900 he came 
into the court house as deputy county clerk under Mr. Kennedy, and lie con- 
tinued in that position for a period of eight years with much satisfaction to 
all concerned as may be ascertained by his long retention there. He mastered 
well every detail of the work in that office, and in 1908 the people of the 
county showed their appreciation of his services and their confidence in his 
integrity by electing him clerk of Montgomery county, the duties of which 
he discharged in a manner highly acceptable to all. 

Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic Order, Lodge Xo. 50, at 
Crawfordsville, also the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Trilje of Ben-Hur, and 
the Patriotic Order Sons of America. ^ 

Mr. Rice owns his own home in Crawfordsville. He is president of 
the Crawfordsville Investment Company, and is a director in the Crawfords- 



932 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ville Young Mens' Christian Association. He is a member of tlie Country 
Club, and is superintendent of the Christian Bible school. In all of the above 
he is active and influential and stands well in all circles in which he chooses 
to move. 



HENRY D. SERVIES. 

One of the popular officials of Montgomery county is Henry D. Ser\'ies, 
the present able and popular incumbent of the office of county recorder, the 
duties of which he is dicharging to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. 
He is widely known throughout this section of the Wabash country, having 
spent his life here and for many years been successfully engaged in business, 
principally vnercbandising, and he has been a progressive man of affairs 
in all walks of life, and has gained the undivided respect of the people as 
a result of his industry, exemplary habits and his public spirit. 

Mr. Servies was born near New Market, Montgomery county, Indiana 
on June 3, 1856. He is a son of William T. and Nancy C. (Jones) Servies, 
both natives of Kentucky from which state they came with their parents to 
Montgomery county this state, when they were children and here they grew 
to maturity and were married and spent the rest of their lives. The father 
is now deceased, his death occurring in 1885. The mother is living at the 
old home. They were honest, hard-working and highly respected people. 

Henry D. Servies grew to manhood in his native county and received a 
fairly good education in the local schools. Early in life he decided upon a 
mercantile career, and upon reaching his majority launched out in that line 
of endeavor, soon giving every evidence of an unusual native ability in that 
direction, and he soon had a good start. He began business in the town of 
Ladoga, and after enjoying an extensive patronage there for a period of two 
years, sold out and opened a general merchandise store in the town of New 
Market, which he continued to conduct with his usual gratifying results until 
1879, when he sold out. He then turned his attention to agriculture, farm- 
ing on an extensive scale during the next ten years, then accepted a position 
as secretary of the American Spoke & Wheel Company, which responsible 
position he occupied in an eminently acceptable manner for a period of two 
years, then returned to the merchandise business, establishing a drug store 
at New Market, and soon had built up a good trade. 

Being an ardent Democrat and having long taken an active part in local 



MOXTCOMKK'i- lOr.VTV. INDIANA. C/T,!, 

party affairs. Mr. Serxics. in n;(iS. was cIccIlhI rui-onlcr n\ .Muiii.i^onK-ry 
county, and he (lischar,i;e(l llic iluties ni this office with such couimcndalion 
that lie was rc-clcctcd in nju an ihs at this writin;;- iucnnil)cnt ni' ilic same, 
giving satisfaction to all concerned, irrespective of party alignment. 

Fraternally, Mr. Servies is a member of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, Knights of Pythias, and Independent Order of Odd l''ellows, 
in all of which he is prominent. 

Mr. Servies was married in 1S73 to r.elle Howard, a nati\c of Mont- 
gomery county, where she grew in wnmanhnod and rccei\c(l her cducatidU. 
and here her people have been well knnwn since the early days. 

To our subject and wife have been born six children, named in order 
of birth as follows: Lettie M., Charles M.. Walter L., Ernest O., Cora A., 
Ruth C. 

Reli,t:;iouslv. Mr. Servies and his family are Methodists, and .stand well 
in the con.ore.eation. 



DR. BERTRAXl) RMIL AIAV. 

The science of osteopathy and other drugless methods of healing have 
made great strides during the past decades, finding followers all over the 
civilized world, especially throughout America. That satisfactory results 
are obtained goes without saying else these systems would have perished in 
their incipiency, for it seems that in this age of the world most any new 
method of healing, religious sect, cult or ism can get a ready following, but 
they must all show definite results and show them (juickly or their followers 
fall away, leaving them without sufiicient support to stand. Oste()i)athy has 
come to stay. Its principles are sound, its methods practical, its results pleas- 
ing to the public in general, so there is no reason why it should \anish from 
the niche it has so securely obtained during its comparatively brief life. One 
of the most popular and able exponents of osteopathy in Montgomery and 
surrounding counties is Dr. Bertrand Emil May, of Crawfordsville. a man 
who justly ranks in the van of professional men of this section of the Hoosier 
state. 

Dr. May was bom at P(.itomac, \'ermilli(in cnunty, Illinois, on Xovcm- 
ber 4. 1876. He is a son of George A. and Ella (Buckingham) May. The 
father was Iiorn in Kentucky in 1839, and there he spent his earlier years, 
but when a young man came to Illinois and established the permanent home 



934 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of the family in Vermillion county and he is still living there, making his 
home in Danville where he has built up a large real estate business. His 
wife was born in Delphi, Indiana. 

Dr. Bertrand E. May received a good common school education at 
Potomac, Illinois, later attending the State Nonnal School at Kirksville, 
Missouri, where he remained two years, later attending the American School 
of Osteopathy in that city, where he made a splendid record and from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1898. 

After his graduation he came to Crawfordsville, Indiana, and began 
the practice of his profession, and here he has remained to the present time, 
having built up an extensive' and lucrative practice which is constantly grow- 
ing, his patients, many of them, coming from remote localities. 

Dr. May is a Republican. He was a candidate for county treasurer in 
1908, but was defeated, after making a splendid race, by only twenty-one 
votes. He is now a Progressive, being deeply interested in the new move- 
ment. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic Order and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

Dr. May was married on June 25, 1902 to Esther Clement, a daughter 
of Frank and Laura (Hutton) Clement. She is a native of Crawfordsville, 
where she grew to womanhood and was educated. 

To the Doctor and wife one daughter has been born, bearing the name 
of Frances Helen Mav. 



GEORGE FELIX MYERS. 

A well known gentleman of Crawfordsville is George Felix Myers, now 
living in honorable retirement, but for a long lapse of years he was a suc- 
cessful business man, engaging in various pursuits in all of which he proved 
to be a man of tact, energy, and the possessor of a high sense of honor, and 
thus ever enjoyed the good will and confidence of all with whom he had deal- 
ings, and as a public servant, as superintendent of the county farm, he dis- 
charged his duties ably and conscientiously, to the commendation of all con- 
cerned. Thus for many reasons, not the least of which is the fact that he 
is one of the veterans of the great army that saved the nation from treason 
during its severest crisis, he is eminently entitled to mention in a volume of 
the province assigned to the one at hand. 

Mr. Myers was born in Fountain county Indiana, August 26, 1833, and 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 935 

he is a son of Xoah and Alary M. Myers. The father who was born in 
North CaroHna in 1810, was an early settler in Fountain county. His wife 
was also a native of North Carolina. There they grew to maturity and were 
married. They located in Montgomery county in 1846, establishing their 
home at Alamo, where Mr. Myers engaged in the general merchandise busi- 
ness for a period of ten years, removing in 1856 to Covington and retired 
from the active duties of life. However, he later came to Rockville, Parke 
county, and engaged in the hotel business until his death, which occurred in 
January. 1882. He was a Democrat, and in religion a Lutheran. His wife 
(lied in Crawfordsville at a ripe old age. 

George F. Myers was educated in the common schools, and he clerked 
in his father's store until the breaking out of the Civil war. having in the 
meantime, however, spent a year in Sioux City, Iowa. He enlisted in the 
Ninth Indiana Light Artillery and served throughout the conflict with much 
credit and faithfulness, participating in a number of important campaigns 
and many battles. After receiving an honorable discharge he returned home 
and engaged in the butcher business at Rockville for a period of six years, 
during which time he built up a large trade. He then entered the revenue 
service as storekeeper at Terre Haute, which position he filled with satisfac- 
tion for a period of four years, after which he resumed the butcher business 
in Rockville, but a year later became time keeper on the railroad at Attica 
for two years. After that he went to Arkansas and engaged in saw milling 
one year. He then cut heading for Henry Alfry, the well known mill man, 
for a period of seven years. Then he took charge of the county farm in 
Montgomery county, which he managed for four years, after which he spent 
four more years as inspector for Henry Alfry, then was again in charge of 
the county farm for a period of six and one-half years. Much improvement 
was made in the farm during the time of his super\'ision. He finally pur- 
chased a farm west of Crawfordsville which he conducted with his usual 
success for a period of ten years, then moved to the county seat and engaged 
in the grocery business one year. He is now living retired from the active 
duties of life. 

Politically, Mr. Myers is a Republican. He is a member of the AIc- 
Pherson Post, Grand Army of the Republic, at Crawfordsville. 

Mr. Myers was married on May 10, 1857 to Mary E. Jarvis, a native of 
Parke county, Indiana. To this union two children were born, one being 
deceased ; the other is Minnie E. Myers, who is fixing at home. 



936 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOSEPH WALTER STIPE. 

No better eulogiiim can be pronounced upon a community or upon its 
individual members than to point to thie work they have accompHshed. 
Theories look fine upon the printed page and sound well when proclaimed 
from the platform, but in the end it is effort in the various lines of industrial 
activity which develop the man and tells on society. This is essentially a 
utilitarian age, and the man of action is very much in evidence. Such a man 
is Joseph Walter Stipe, one of the best known citizens of the eastern part of 
Montgomery county, a retired farmer and capitalist, of New Ross, and as 
such it is a pleasure to contemplate briefly his career and character. Inti- 
mately associated for years with the industrial de\-elopment of Walnut town- 
ship and taking a prominent part in the public affairs of the county, he has not 
been underestimated by the people who long since learned to appreciate his 
true value as a potent factor in the body politic. Though a man of unpreten- 
tious demeanor, he possesses the silent but powerful force that attracts men, 
the mental Cjualities that grapple them to him as it were, \\ith hooks of steel, 
and the tact and magnetism that makes men as well as e\'ents subserve his just 
purpose. 

Mr. Stipe was l)orn at Shannondale, Montgomery county. Indiana, 
November 21, 1853. He is a son of John and Eliza (Higgason) Stipe. The 
father was born in Harrison county, Indiana, in December, 1820, and the date 
of the mother's birth is July 21, 1826. She was a daughter of William and 
Sally Ann (Herron) Higgason. The father came to Montgomery county in 
1829 and settled in Franklin township, where he remained until his marriage 
when he was thirty-one years old. He then went to Shannondale, this county, 
and engaged in the saw mill business for a year, then came to Walnut town- 
ship, Montgomery county, and bought a farm from the heirs of Webster Rob- 
erts, and there he lived until the death of his wife whereupon he moved to 
New Ross, living with our subject until his death at the advanced age of 
eighty-four years. His death occurred while our subject lived in Boone 
county. 

Only two children were born to John Stipe and wife, Joseph W., of this 
sketch, who was born in the old Presbyterian church at Shannondale ; and 
John William, who was born July 15, 1862, and died March 28, 1890. Al- 
though fi^•e Stipe men settled in Indiana in the early days our subject is the 
only one of the name now living here. 

Mr. Stipe received a common school education and spent one term at 
Mooresville, Indiana, then took up farming on the home place, later purchas- 




^^^^.Of: j>^ 



MONTGOMKRV COL'XTV, INDIANA. 9^7 

ing one hundred and twenty acres in Jackson townsliip. He lived in an old 
log cabin on the home place the first year he farmed there. He remained in 
Jackson township thirty years, during which period his rise was steady and 
certain and he ranked among the leading farmers and stock raisers of the 
township for many years, finally, accumulating a comfortable competency 
through his close application and able management, he retired from active 
farming, moving to the village of New Ross, where he has a lieautiful and 
modernly appointed residence. He still owns the old home place, two hun- 
dred and thirty-nine acres in Walnut township; four hundred and thirty acres 
in Jackson township, and fifty-two acres in Union township. It is all well 
improved ami \aluable land, that lying in Union township being especially 
desirable since it is nearly inside the city limits of Crawfnrdsvillc and will 
make a splendid residence addition. 

Mr. Stipe was married on September 15, 1874 to Elizabeth Evans, who 
was born on January 23, 1855. She is a daughter of William B. and Ariann 
(Powell) Evans. The older members of the Evans family came to Mont- 
gomerv county from Kentucky in a very early day and established their future 
home here. 

Mrs. Stipe was called to Jier eternal rest on September 14, 1910. at the 
age of fifty-six years. This union was without issue. On April 17, 1912. 
Mr. Stipe was united in marriage to Rose L. Harple, who was born August 
30, 1873. She is a daughter of John and Lydia Ann (Jennings) Harple. 
The father was a native of Logan county, Ohio, and the mother was born 
in Tippecanoe county, Indiana. They spent their lives on a farm, and to them 
the following children were born : Mary, George are both deceased : Viola, 
Douglas, Anna, Rose (wife of Mr. Stipe), Floyd and Pearl. The parents 
of these children are both deceased. 

Politically, Mr. Stipe is a Democrat and wlule he takes the interest of a 
good citizen in public affairs he has never cared for office, preferring to devote 
his attention to his large farming properties. 



BEXNET BEARD ENGLE. 

The family represented by the gentleman whose name introduces this 
article has always been classed with the best and thriftiest of Montgomery 
county, the interests of which they have ever had at heart and sought to 
promote whenever proper occasion presented itself. 



938 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Bennett Beard Engle, the present able and popular county auditor of 
this county, is one of the best known members of this excellent old family. 
He was born in December, 1874, in Union township, Montgomery county, 
Indiana, and is a son of Bennett W. and Whillie (Beard) Engle. The father 
was born near Harper's Ferry, Virginia, January 19, 1820, and was a son 
of Michael and Elizabeth (Pollock) Engle. Michael Engle was born in 
Ireland and when a young man he emigrated to America and here spent the 
rest of his life, becoming well established in the New World through his 
industry. His death occurred in 1828. His wife was a native of England, 
and she died in 1830. 

Bennett W. Engle, father of our subject, lived with his brother until 
1833 when he came to Rising Sun, Indiana, where he clerked in a store until 
1845, ^vhen he came to Crawfordsville, Montgomery county. Here he soon 
became an influential factor in the affairs of the county and became owner 
and editor of the Crawfordsville Review, which he conducted satisfactorily 
for a period of three years, when he was appointed by President James K. 
Polk as "receiver of the public money," the duties of which he performed in 
a highly commendable manner until he was removed by President Zachary 
Taylor on account of political differences. In 1852 he became local editor 
of the Crawfordsville Reziew, and in 1853 took a position as cashier of the 
Elston Bank. This he held in a manner satisfactory to all concerned for a 
period of forty-three years. His death occurred in 1896. Politically, he 
was a stanch Democrat. He attended the Episcopal church, and, fraternally, 
belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Bennett W. Engle and Whillie Beard were married on September 13, 
1854. She was a daughter of Hon. John and Maria (Burroughs) Beard. 
The father of Mrs. Engle was born in North Carolina, January 4, 1795, and, 
after spending his boyhood in the South, came to Wayne county, Indiana, in 
an early day, and in 1823, took up his residence among the pioneers of Unioji 
township, Montgomery county, this state. Here he became influential in 
public affairs and was justice of the peace many years. He was elected to 
both houses of the state legislature, being a member of that body for a period 
of twenty-five years, during which he perfomied a praiseworthy service for 
his constituents and for the general good fo his location and the state. He 
had the honor of being known as the father of the present excellent public 
school system of Indiana. He was a man of fine intellectual attainments, 
strong personality, and honesty of purpose and he was for over a quarter of 
a centurv one of the best known and influential men in western Indiana. He 



MONTC.OMKKV COLXTV, INDIANA. 939 

was a member of tlie hoard of control of the Bhnd Asyhim for six years. 
He was receiver of pubhc monies at the land office in Cra\vfords\ illc, under 
President Benjamin Harrison's first administration. He was an uncoiiii)ro- 
mising Republican. His death occurred on September 29, 1874, when 
seventy-nine years old, after an honored career, and his passing was regarded 
as a distinct loss to the people of Montgomery county and the Wabash valley 
country as well as to the state. He married in 1816. and his wife, Mrs. 
Maria Burroughs, also lived to an advanced age, dying in- 1884. 

Bennett B. Engle, the immediate subject of this sketch, grew to manhood 
in Union township, Montgomery county, and he spent his boyhood days in 
much the same manner as other youths of his time, receiving a good educa- 
tion in the local schools. He engaged in various pursuits with more or less 
success, until his election as county auditor, the duties of which responsible 
position he discharged so satisfactorily that he was re-elected and is at this 
writing serving his second term. He has proven to be, according to com- 
mon consent, one of the best public servants the county has ever hatl. He 
is careful, painstaking and obliging as well as energetic. 

Mr. Engle is prominent in Masonic affairs. He is past master of the 
local doge of Masons. He is also a member of the Ancient Arabic Order 
of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is at present secretary of all the Masonic 
bodies of Crawfordsville. 



ASHER WERT. 



This is an age in which the farmer stands pre-eminently above any other 
class as a producer of wealth, and there is a rapidly growing sentiment among 
the dwellers of the great cities that the rural districts are the best, being most 
desirable from a number of standpoints, the principal one being health of 
both body and mind, for without that nothing else matters very much ; so 
they are going back to the soil in ever-increasing numbers, for there they not 
only find a greater independence but really have more of the good things 
of life. The farmer does not have to put forth such strenuous efforts to 
feed himself and his family. He simply takes advantage of the winds, the 
warm air, the bright, life-giving sunshine, the refreshing rains, and handling 
nature's gifts rightly, reaps the rewards that always come to patient, persist- 
ent toil. One of this number is Asher Wert, who has spent his life in Mont- 
gomery county successfully engaged in general agricultural and stock raising 



940 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

pursuits, having ranked for many decades among the leaders in these hnes 
of endeavor and owning one of the choicest farms in Union township, just 
outside of the city Hmits of Crawfordsville in which city he now hves, prac- 
tically retired from the active duties of life. 

Mr. Wert was born on March lO, 1844, near Alamo, Montgomery 
county. He was a son of Richard and Amanda (Compton) Wert, an hon- 
ored old couple who came to this locality when it was practically a wilder- 
ness and here became comfortably etsabli.shed by their industry. The\- ha\e 
both been long deceased. 

Asher \Vert grew to manhood on the home farm and he received such 
education as the early schools of those times afforded. He began life for 
himself when young as a farmer, and, working hard and being economical, 
he soon had a start and eventually became one of the substantial and prosper- 
ous men of his township, becoming the owner of two hundred and forty- 
three acres of fine and \aluable farming land just outside of Crawfordsville 
and this he placed under a high state of improvement and cultivation. In 
connection with general farming he always made the raising and preparing 
of live stock for the market a specialty, and he has long been considered one 
of the best judges of live stock, especially cattle in Montgomer}- county, and 
he is still engaged in buying and selling cattle and feeding them for the 
market. He has also long been one of the largest hog raisers in the county. 
No small portion of his comfortable competency has been realized out of live 
stock. In I goo he gave up active farming and moved into the city of Craw- 
fordsville and built the present beautiful home at 509 East Market street. It 
is attractive from an architectural stand point and is modernly appointed and 
neatly furnished throughout. 

PoliticaHy, Mr. Wert is a Democrat and has been more or less active 
in local party afifairs, and was for about eight years road supervisor. He is 
a member of the Knights of Pythias, and he holds to Quakerism in his 
religious belief. He is treasurer of the Montgomery County Agricultural 
Society, and has done much toward its success, taking an active and intelli- 
gent interest in the same. 

Mr. Wert was married on October 21, 1875 to Angeline Hankins, who 
was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, July 3, 1848. She is a daughter of 
John L. and Orpha H. (Hancock) Hankins. The father was a native of 
Ohio and the mother was born in Kentucky. They came to Montgomery 
county in 1873, locating near Alamo where they became very well established 
through their close application and economy and were highly respected by 



MONTGOMKRY COrNTV. INniANA. 94 1 

their neighbors. They are l)oth now deceased. There, on tlie nld hunie- 

stead, Mrs. Wert yrew to wunianhocjd and receixed her edueatinn in the 
common schools. 

The union of our suhject and wife resnUed in liie birth nf two children. 

named as follows: Rose Lee. now the wife of John P>. Line, of Craw- 
fordsxille : antl Pearl Oral, who died in infancy. 



MILTOX L. XEES. 



Success has come to .Milti>n L. Xees, the present able and popular 
county surveyor of Montgomery county, because he has worked for it along 
legitimate lines and has closely applied himself. He is an excellent example 
of the .successful self-made man, and is eminently deserving of the con- 
spicuous position which he now occupies in the estimation of the pcfiple. 
He is a man who has never for a moment permitted untoward circumstances 
to divert his attention from the goal he bad in mind when starting out in life. 
He has never waited for someone else to do what he should do himself, 
and he might be cited to the young men of bis comity as an exami)le worthy 
of their careful study. 

Mr. Xees was born in Owen county, Indiana. March _• i . 1S73. and is a 
son of David A. and Sarah A. (Kennedy) Xees. The father was a farmer, 
and shortly after the birth of our subject he nio\-ed to Kansas, locating at 
Independence, and there his death occurred in 1883. Mrs. Xees then re- 
turned to Owen county, Indiana, where she is now living. 

Milton L. Xees received a good education in the common .schools of In- 
dependence. Kansas, and the Owen county rural schools, later attending 
school at Spencer and \'alparaiso, Indiana. After passing through the nor- 
mal at the latter town, he began teaching in Owen county, which line of 
endeavor he continued with much success and satisfaction to the people for 
a period of seven years, during which time he took a high rank with the 
leading educators of that section of the state. IUit finally tiring of the school 
room and having long entertained an ambition to become a ci\il engineer 
he took a course in this science with the International Correspondence 
Schocjls, and at the same time managed to secure considerable practical ex- 
perience, so he became well fitted to enter the arena of bis chosen life work. 
having prepared himself principally during the summer \acations while he 
was teaching. 



942 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Nees came to Montgomery county in 1901 and here worked at his 
profession until 1906, when he was elected county surveyor. He made such 
a splendid record, doing his work so skillfully and conscientiously that he 
was re-elected in 1908, in 1910 and 1912, which is certainly sufficient evi- 
dence of his popularity in the county and of the explicit confidence which 
the people repose in him. He has been a close student of all phases of this 
field of endeavor and has kept fully abreast of the times. During this period 
of his incumbency Mr. Nees has done much for the permanent good of the 
county, such as the construction of twenty-five gravel roads, and there are 
at this writing seventy-five others under way. 

Politically, Mr. Nees is a Democrat and is active in the affairs of his 
party. Fraternally, he is a chapter member of the Masons and belongs to 
the Ivnights of Pythias, the Tribe of Ben-Hur and the Modem Woodmen 
of America. 

Mr. Nees was married on June 5, 1901, to Lulu Turner, a native of 
New Ross, who was born there on June 25, 1880. This union has been 
blessed by the birth of three children — Ruth, Sarah and Marcella. 



ANDREW N. FOLEY. 

The legal profession of Montgomery county has an able exponent in 
Andrew N. Foley, of Crawfordsville, who is one of the best known of the 
younger generation of attorneys and one to whom the future seems to 
beckon with special promise. He has worked hard, built himself up from 
the bottom of the ladder by persistent, honest endeavor and has worthily 
attained the large success in his chosen field of endeavor that he now occu- 
pies. He is a conscientious worker, leaving nothing undone whereby he 
may further the interests of his clients. He knows the importance of going 
into court well prepared, and he has great weight with juries and the court, 
owing to his never-failing courtesy, his earnestness and logical reasoning. 
He has kept well abreast of the times in all phases of jurisprudence and is 
familiar with the statutes of Indiana. He is a man who believes in giving 
the best there is in him to whatever task he undertakes, and this is one of 
the principal secrets of his success. Another thing, he never waits for some- 
one else to do what he should himself perform. 

Mr. Foley was bom on November 19, 1877, in Coal Creek township, 
Montgomery county. He is a son of John A. and Bridget (Coleman) 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INDIANA. 943 

Foley, both natives of Ireland, the mother being born on June 22, 1850. 
John A. Foley left his native land when a young man and emigrated to 
America, coming direct to Montgomery county, Indiana, and locating in 
Coal Creek township, on a farm, and there he became very well established 
through his industrj- and perseverance, ranking among the leading farmers 
of his township. He devoted his life to argicultural pursuits. In 1888 he 
moved to Wingate, and his death occurred at an advanced age on July 4, 
1912. Politically, he was a Democrat, and in religion a stanch Catholic. 
His wife preceded him to the grave on February 14, 1897. They were the 
parents of ten children, five of whom are still living, namely: Michael E., 
of Indianapolis, was born on September 14, 1872, was graduated from Wa- 
bash College in 1899, then spent one year in the Columbia Law School in 
New York, atter which he returned to Montgomery county, and for a 
period of nine years from 1900 to 1909, he was in partnership with Judge 
Thomas, of Crawfordsville, and became one of the leading lawyers of this 
section of the state. He is at present counsel for the Terre Haute. Indianapo- 
lis & Eastern Traction Company. James E., tlie second child born to Joim .\. 
Foley and wife, first saw the light of day on April 6, 1874, is still farming 
on the home place in Coal Creek township, this county ; William L., born 
June 18, 1875, is a farmer in Coal Creek township; Andrew N.. of this 
review; Charles X., born February 24, 1879. is also farming in Coal Creek 
township. 

Andrew N. Foley grew to manhood on the home farm and there he 
assisted with the general work when a boy. He received a good common 
school education, after which he began life for himself by teaching school, 
which he followed continuously for a [period of ten years with great suc- 
cess, during which his services were in great demand, for he gave eminent 
satisfaction to both pupil and patron, he having been both an entertainer and 
an instructor in the school room. But believing that the law was his true 
bent, he finally tired of the school room and turned his attention earnestly 
to the law. He entered the Indiana Law School at Indianapolis, where he 
made an excellent record and was graduated with the class of 1907. of 
which he was valedictorian. Thus well equipi>ed for his life work he liegan 
practice at Covington, Indiana, as deputy prosecuting attorney, and re- 
mained there for a period of two years, giving eminent satisfaction and 
getting a good start. In 1909 he came to Crawfordsville and entered into 
partnership with Judge Thomas, with whom he has continued to the present 
time, enjoying a large and lucrative clientele. 



944 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Foley was married on April 5, 1899, to Mary A. Crane, of Hoops- 
ton, Illinois. Her death occurred on March 10, 1904. To this union two 
children were born, one of whom is deceased ; Bernard B. is in school. 

Politically, Mr. Foley is a Democrat; religiously, a Catholic; and fra- 
ternally, a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Knights of Columbus, and the Tribe Ben-Hur. 



IRA CLOUSER. 



Selecting- the law as his sphere, early in life, Ira Clouser, the able and 
popular prosecuting attorney of Montgomery county, and one of Crawfords- 
ville's best known professional men, has devoted his energies exclusively to 
that, ignoring other aspirations to make himself what he is today, well nigh a 
thorough master of legal science in all its ramifications. The common law, 
the statutes of Indiana, the history, progress and growth of jurisprudence, as 
well as the higher and more abstruse principles of equity, are all completely 
at his command, constituting him one of the leaders of the local bar, which 
position is readily conceded to him by his associates. As a practitioner he is 
cautious, vigilant and indefatigable, contesting every point with unyielding 
tenacity and employing his vast store of legal knowledge in sustaining his 
positions and attacking those of his adversary. Jn argument Mr. Clouser is 
clear, forcible, logical and convincing, his irreproachable personal character 
and untarnished honor giving him great weight with juries, and his known 
ability and learning equally impressing the bench. Such a man is a credit to 
the community, and his life forcibly illustrates what energy and consecutive 
effort can accomplish when directed and controlled by correct principles and 
high moral resolves, his character being the expression of a strong, virile 
nature, and his name is entitled to a conspicuous place in a work of the 
province assigned to the one in hand. 

Mr. Clouser was born in Sugar Creek township, Montgomery county, 
Indiana, October 15, 1874. He is a son of Daniel and Mahala (Hampton) 
Clouser. 

Daniel Clouser was born on January 17, 1833 i" ^o^s county, Ohio. He 
is a son of John and Margaret (Orick) Clouser, the fomier bom in 1777 in 
Pennsylvania, from which state he moved to Ohio soon after the close of the 
war of 1812, in which he served. He remained in Ohio until 1822 when he 
moved to Indiana, when Daniel Clouser was five years old, and here John 
Clouser spent the rest of his life, dying in 1868. He was a man of many 
trades. He ran a saw mill in Ohio and after coming to Indiana he continued 




IRA CLOUSER 



MONTCMJMERY COINTV, INDIANA. 945 

to operate a saw mill, also a grist mill. These mills or combination mill was 
located in Sugar Creek township, Montgomery county, and patrons came 
from all over this section of the country. His wife, Margaret Orick, was 
born in 1771. Her grandmother came from Ireland. The death of Mrs. 
Margaret Clouser occurred alxjut the time she reached the century mark. 
Five children were born to John Clouser and wife, Daniel ])eing the only one 
living at this writing, he having been the youngest in order of birth; the 
others were named Mary, Alfred, Henry and George, all long since deceased. 

Daniel Clouser received what little education he could while growing to 
manhood amid pioneer environments, attending school in an old log school 
house with puncheon floor and seats and greased paper for a window ])ane. 
He has li\ed to see Sugar Creek township develop from a veritable wilderness 
to one of the most advanced farming communities in the state and he has been 
active in the progress of his community and is one of our most substantial 
farmers and honored citizens. 

On October 6, 1859 Daniel Clouser married Mahala Hampton, who was 
bom on February 7, 1840, in Crawfordsville, Indiana, and was a daughter of 
Michael and Catherine (Booher) Hampton, her parents being from 
Tennessee. 

Eight children were born to Daniel Clouser and wife, all sur\i\ing but 
one ; they were named as follows : Mary, John. Chestley, Sarah is deceased ; 
Frank, Marion, Ira, subject of this .sketch; and Grace. 

Daniel Clouser has lived in Sugar Creek township seventy-six years, and 
is therefore perhaps the oldest inhabitant of this part of tlie county. He has 
always engaged in general farming and stock raising, also ran the Clouser 
mill for many years, and was postmaster there quite a long time. He has 
always been one of the prominent and influential citizens of the northeastern 
part of the county, and no man is held in higher esteem, for his life has l>een 
exemplary in every respect. He is owner of a finely improved and productive 
farm of four hundred and forty-two acres of valuable land in Sugar Creek 
and Franklin townships. He remodeled his. dwelling some time ago and has 
a large, pleasant home and a good set of outbuildings. An excellent grade 
of live stock is always to be seen about his barns and fields. 

Politically, Daniel Clouser is a Democrat and has long been a leader in 
local public affaris. He served as justice of the peace in Sugar Creek town- 
ship for some time, discharging the duties of the same in a manner that re- 
flected much credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. His decisions were characterized by uniform fairness to all parties 
and they were seldom reversed at the hands of higher tribunals. 
(60) 



946 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Ira Clouser received a good education in the common schools, the 
preparatory department of Wabash College and two years in the regular col- 
lege work here, later attending the Indiana University at Bloomington for a 
year and a half. In 1900 he began reading law in the office of Johnston & 
Johnston, and, making rapid progress, was admitted to the bar in 1902. He 
then established himself in the practice at Ladoga, opening an office there on 
August 12, 1903. He soon had a good practice there, and became attorney 
for the Ladoga B. & L. Company. In 19 10 he was elected prosecuting at- 
torney of Montgomery county, and his record was so eminently commendable 
that he was re-elected to this responsible post in 191 2, and is still discharging 
the affairs of the office in a manner that reflects much credit upon himself 
and to the satisfaction of all concerned. He has been connected with a num- 
ber of important cases in this connection and has been very successful in the 
trial of the same. One of the most important of these was the Jeffries mur- 
der case, in June, 1911. He has been prompt and effectual in the discharge 
of his duty in bringing about better moral conditions in the city of Crawfords- 
ville and throughout Montgomery county. He lias lost Init one case during 
his practice as prosecutor in circuit court. 

Fraternally, Mr. Clouser is a thirty-second degree Mason, belonging to 
the Knights Templar, the Order of the Eastern Star, having been worthy 
patron of the letter, and filled all offices in the Blue Lodge. He is also a 
member of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Murat 
Temple at Indianapolis. He is also a member of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, the Progressive Order of Sons of America, and the Phi 
Kappa Psi, the latter a Wabash College fraternity. He is an uncompromis- 
ing Democrat and has for some years been a local leader in the party. 

Mr. Clouser was married on October 26, 1904 to Alice Sands, a lady of 
many estimable characteristics. She was born, reared and educated in Mont- 
gomery county, and is a daughter of Wilson and Mary Sands, a prominent 
family of Darlington. 



ROBERT HAMILTON WILLIAMS. 

Among the younger generations of lawyers in Montgomeiy county who 
give unusual promise of great future success the name of Robert Hamilton 
Williams, of Crawfordsville, must stand among the first in the list, for both 
nature and training seem to have combined in making him an attorney of 
rare power. All this, however, he takes as a matter of course, having 



MONTGOMERY COUXTV. UN' HI AX A. 047 

worked hard, and to those who put forth effort, continued and close, for a 
long period, success comes not as a surprise but as their legitimate reward. 
He is a plain, unassuming gentleman who is well liked !))■ all who know him. 

Mr. Williams was born on January lo, 1876, at Fincastle, Putnam 
county, Indiana, and he is a son of James Chrittenden Williams and Mary 
Alice (Bridges) Williams. The father was born near Mt. Vernon, Ken- 
tucky, December 15, 1849. I" 1852, when he was three years of age, his 
parents moved with him to Putnam county, Indiana, and here established 
themselves on a farm. James C. Williams has also devoted his life to 
farming with much success, living now on a good farm in Putnam county. 
Mrs. Williams was a native of Putnam county, lier birth having occurred 
there on November 4, 1855. 

Robert H. Williams was reared on the home farm and there he as- 
sisted with the general work when a boy, attending the district schools dur- 
ing the winter montlis. He later attended the high school at Fincastle, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1892. He then entered DePauw 
University at Greencastle, Indiana, teaching school one year and attending 
the university the next, thus being able to defray his own expenses for a 
higher education. He was in school at DePauw about three }-ears. He then 
entered the Indiana Law School in Indianapolis, from whicii he was grad- 
uated with the class of 1904, having made an excellent record there. 

After finishing his education, he came to Crawfordsville and began the 
practice of his profession in the law office of Schuyler Kennedy, in which 
he remained for nine months, then went to the office of Whittington & W'iiit- 
tington, working there as law clerk until 1906, when upon the retirement of 
one of the members of the firm he succeeded him, the firm name becoming 
thereupon Whittington & Williams. This partnership continued with much 
success until the death of Mr. Whittington, since which time Mr. Williams 
has practiced alone, having built up an extensive, ever growing and lucrative 
patronage, and ranking among the leading attorneys of the local bar, figuring 
conspicuously in many of the important cases in this section of the state. 
He has remained a close student and is thus a capable, well infomied, cau- 
tious and earnest lawyer who guards carefully the interests of his clients, 
and, being a logical and forceful speaker, he has great influence over juries. 

Mr. Williams in his fraternal relations is a member of the Masonic 
Order, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Tribe of Een-Hur. Re- 
ligiously, he is a Universalist, and in politics a Republican. 

Mr. Williams was married on December 23, 1900, to Winnie Louisa 



948 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Stanley, of Fincastle, Indiana. She was l)orn there on January 9, 1880, and is 
a daughter of Dr. Logan and .\ngehne (Korsher) Stanley, a well known 
family of that place. There she grew to womanhood and received her early 
education. To this union one child has been born — Ward Stanley Williams. 



DUMONT M. PECK 



The popular and well known mercantile firm of Warner & Peck in 
Crawfords\'ille is deserving of the ever growing prestige which is theirs, be- 
cause they have given their thousands of pleased customers honest goods and 
courteous treatment and ha\e sought, so far as ixjssible. to carry the prin- 
ciples of the Golden Rule into their everyday work. They are each men of 
industry and sound judgment and wliile laboring for their own advancement 
have at the same time sought to advance the general welfare of Crawfords- 
ville and Montgomery county. 

Dumont M. Peck was born in Newton county, Indiana, Januarj' 20, 
1877. He is a son of Egbert A. and Gertrude (Morgan) Peck, both of 
whom are still living in Newton county. 

Dumont M. Peck grew to manhood in his native county and there re- 
ceived a good common school education, subsequently entering Wabash Col- 
lege, where he made a splendid record and was graduated with the class of 
1900. He then entered the mercantile field in Crawfordsville in partnership 
with Lee S. Warner, under the firm name of Warner & Peck, and they have 
continued to the present time with ever increasing success until they carry 
a large and carefully selected stock at all seasons and have built up an ex- 
tensive and lucrative trade, many of their customers coming from all parts of 
the county, and their store is a favorite stopping place with the people of the 
rural di.stricts for here they find everything pleasant and are accorded uni- 
form courtesy by both management and clerks. 

Mr. Peck has been very successful in a business way and he is secretary 
and treasurer of the Crawfordsville Heating Compan\-, and is second vice- 
president of the Central States Life Insurance Company. He is also vice- 
president of the Commercial Association. In all these responsible positions 
he is giving the utmost satisfaction to all concerned. 

Politically, he is a Republican, but has never been especially active in 
public matters. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic Order, having at- 
tained to the Knights Templar degrees, also belongs to the Ancient Arabic 



MONT(;()MERV COrNTV. INDIAXA. 949 

Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Murat Temple, at Indianapolis. He 
is a member of the Tribe of Ben-Hur, the Modern Woodmen of .\merica. 
the Court of Honor and the Patriotic Order Sons of .\merica. In all of 
these he takes considerable interest. 

Mr. Peck was married in September, xcps. to Juliet .\. Warner, and to 
this union one child has been born, David W'., who is now attending .school. 



JOHN HENRY BEESON, D. D. S. 

One of the most promising of the younger professional men of Mont- 
gomery county is Dr. John Henry Beeson, a popular and skilled dentist of 
Crawfordsville. He is already well abreast of the times in all that pertains 
to his calling, but he is making every effort to learn more of the art of al- 
leviating the ills of suffering humanity in his particular field of endeavor. 
It has not been so very long ago that a man who devoted his entire atten- 
tion to the teeth could not be found except in the few largest cities of the 
country, the country family physician being relied upon to extract with his 
rusty forcepts the aching molar— there was no other thing to do, it was be- 
lieved; however, for reasons which scientific men are unable to clearly ex- 
plain, the people of two or three generations ago, or even one, had teeth 
which did not readily decay, and it was not uncommon for one to reach the 
Psalmist's three score and ten years with a full set of good teeth. Such a 
thing today is perhaps very improbable. So we must have skdled men to 
presen-e our teeth, and thus our general health. 

Dr. Beeson was born on March lo, 1883, in Marshall, Indiana. He is a 
son of Stephen K. and Ellen M. Beeson, who are still living in Parke 
county, having a good home there as a result of their industry and there 
they are highly respected, being people of industry and honesty. 

Dr. Beeson grew to manhood in his native county and there received a 
good education in the common schools, after which he spent two years at 
the University of Indiana at Bloomington. Having long entertained a lau- 
dable ambition to enter the dental profession he, while yet but a l)oy, began 
directing his efforts in this direction, and with a view to perfecting himself 
in the same, so far as modern methods are concerned, he entered the Indiana 
Dental College at Indianapolis, where he made a splendid record, and from 
which institution he was graduated in 1908. 

Returning to his native community he at once opened an office at Mar- 



950 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

shall, Parke count}', where he remained a short time and was getting a good 
start, but "seeking a wider field for the exercise of his talents he came to 
Crawfordsville, Montgomery county, in 1909, and here he has since been 
engaged in the practice of his profession with ever increasing success, and 
now enjoys a large and lucrative patronage and is fast taking a position in 
the front ranks of the leading dentists of the \\'abash valley country. He 
has a neat and sanitary office, fully equipped w ith all the improved and 
modern devices and appliances to insure quick and high grade service. 

Dr. Beeson is a member of the Masonic Order, including the Royal 
Arch Masons; also the Knights of Pythias, the Sons of Veterans, and the 
Delta Sigma Delta at Indianapolis. 

On August 23, 1910, Dr. Beeson was married to Winnie Davis, a 
daughter of George Davis and wife, of Crawfordsville, a well known local 
family, and here Mrs. Beeson was reared to womanhood and was educated. 

The Doctor takes an interest in military affairs, and is the efficient 
second lieutenant of Company B, Second Infantry, Indiana National Guard. 



CHALMERS ELEAZAR FULLENWIDER. 

The career of Chalmers Eleazar Fullenwider, who is a well known 
dealer in real estate and loan business in Crawfordsville, has been a varied 
and interesting one, and has provved that he can make a success of other 
lines of endeavor except farming, which has been his chief life work. Al- 
though a native of the locality of which this history treats, he spent a quar- 
ter of a centuiy of the most active years of his life in the Blue Grass state. 
His actions have ever been the result of careful and conscientious thought, 
and when once convinced that he is right, no suggestion of policy or per- 
sonal profit can swen-e him from the course he has decided upon. He has 
sought to do his full duty in all the relations of life, and he has won and 
retained the good will of all who know him. 

Mr. Fullenwider was born in Brown township, Montgomery county, 
Indiana, August 19, 1844. He is a son of Eleazar and Lavinia (Allen- 
Fullenwider. The former was the son of Jacob and Katie (Winters) 
Fullenwider. Eleazar was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, February 5, 
1802, and there he spent his young manhood, being twenty-eight years of 
age, when, in 1830, he left the "dark and bloody ground" country and came 
to Sugar Creek township, Montgomery county, Indiana, w'here he entered 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 95 1 

one hundred and sixty acres from the government, and remained there four 
years, then removed to Brown township, where he bought land which he 
farmed until his death, on May 5, 1871. He became well known among the 
early-day citizens of the county and was respected for his industry and hon- 
esty. In early life he was a Whig, but when that party ceased to exist and 
the Republican party was formed in the early fifties, he identified himself 
with that party, with which he remained the rest of his life. He was a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church. He married Lavinia Allen in Shelby county, 
Kentucky, where she was born on October 15, 1802. Her death occurred 
in Brown township, Montgomery county, Indiana, at an advanced age. 

Chalmers E. Fullenwider, of this review, grew to manhood on the 
home farm, where he worked hard when a boy, and he received his educa- 
tion in the district schools, which he attended during the winter months, 
later studying at Waveland Academy, where he finished his education in 
1866. 

In June, 1862, Mr. Fullenwider enlisted in the one-hundred-day ser- 
vice, becoming a member of Company G, Fifty-fifth Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, in which he served very faithfully until in September following. He 
returned home and began farming and attending school, which he alternated 
until 1866, then worked steadily on the farm until 1868. In that year he 
entered the mercantile business in Crawfordsville, conducting the "Enter- 
prise Store" for two years, enjoying a very satisfactory business. He re- 
turned to agricultural pursuits, however, in 1870, and in 1874 moved to 
Shelby\-ille, Kentuck)-, where he resided for a period of twenty-five years, 
making a success of his life work there. In 1900 he came back to Craw- 
fordsville, Indiana, and opened an office for the transaction of real estate 
and the loan business, and this he has continued to conduct to the present 
time, with much success, having built up a large and growing business. 

He is a niemljer of the Grand Army of the Republic, which he joined 
in Kentucky. He is a Republican, but has never been especially active. He 
belongs to the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Fullenwider was married to Fannie E. Shipman on May 12, 1868. 
She was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, on May 13, 1845, a"<^l her death 
occurred on July 22, 1909. 

To this union were born four children, namely: James C. who li\es in 
Sumner, Washington; Wesley A., who is clerking in Sliel1)yville, l\entuck\-; 
J. Newton, who li\es in Crawfordsville: Francis C., of Los .\ngeles, Cali- 
fornia. 



952 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



JAMES TAYLOR. 



One of the honored pioneer families of Union township, Montgomery 
county, and one that did a great deal in the early development of the same 
were the Taylors, one of the best known of the present generation being 
James Taylor a progressive fanner of Union township, where he has spent 
his life and where he has lived to see great changes take place. He enjoys 
the much-appreciated privilege of living on the place where he first opened 
his eyes to the light of day, which privilege is not vouchsafed to many of us. 
For no matter if the new home may l)e more picturesque, in pleasanter en- 
vironment and where a livelihood may be gained easier, yet it lacks some- 
thing, a subtle, inscrutable charm, an elusive atmosphere which one finds at 
the old home place. .A.11 this has been fully appreciated by the subject, and 
he has built a fine home on the site of the original buildings. He has skil- 
fully rotated the crops so that the land has retained its original fertility and 
productiveness, and he is regarded as one of the best general farmers and 
most successful stock raisers in his neighborhood. 

James Taylor was born in this township and county, on November 17, 
1842. He is a son of Brazila and Nancy (Huston) Taylor. Brazila Tay- 
lor was born in Tennessee, where he spent his earlier years, and from which 
state he came to Montgomery county, Indiana, in the early twenties, when the 
Wabash valley was yet a wilderness, where the log cabins of the first settlers 
were very few and from which the echo of the Indian huntsman's halloo had 
scarcely died away. But the elder Taylor was a typical pioneer, a man who 
braved the wilds with courage and never permitted obstacles to stand in tlie 
way. and he was able to foresee a great country here, so he went to work 
with a will and in due time had established a good home and a fine farm in 
Union township, where he became well known among the pioneers. He 
continued farming all his life, dying here in 1850. Mrs. Taylor has also 
been deceased many years. 

James Taylor, of this review, was reared in his native vicinity, and here 
he found plenty of hard work to do when a boy, being the son of one of the 
early settlers. In the winter time he attended school in the log school house 
of the neighborhood. 

Mr. Taylor has farmed all his life, each succeeding year finding him 
further advanced than the preceding, and he is now the owner of four hun- 
dred and sixty acres of valuable and well located land, forty acres of which 
were part of the old homestead, which he has kept well improved and under a 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INIHANA. 953 

high state of cuUivation. He has long made a speciahy of raising a good grade 
of hogs, cattle and horses, and no small part of his annual income is derived 
from this source. 

Politically, Mr. Taylor is a Republican, and while he takes nnicli inter- 
est in local public affairs he has never had an ambition to be a i)u]itician. In 
religious matters, he belongs to the Christian church. bVaternalh , he is a 
member of the Masonic order. 

Mr. Taylor was married on February 15, 1871, to Elizabeth Miller, and 
to this union four children have been born, one of whom is deceased ; Frank 
S. and Edna M. are living at home; John L. is farming in Union township, 
on the old home place; he married Emma Laliy. and they have c)ne child. 
John Robert. 



SAMUEL PHELPS TEMPLETON. 

This gentleman is one of tlie many young men on whom will rest the 
responsibility of the future prosperity of Crawfordsville and Montgomery 
county, and from all indications he will be a credit to the community, as he 
is industrious and energetic to a marked degree and gives promise of future 
influence and usefulness exceeding what has been his in the past. Too much 
praise cannot be given Mr. Templeton for the industry and discretion which 
has marked his career, the judgment displayed by him having ever been 
far beyond his years, and proclaiming him more than an average in busi- 
ness capacity. He is a young man of integrity and worth and stands high 
in the community. 

Samuel Phelps Templeton, well known undertaker and embalmer of 
Crawfordsville, was born August 24, 1872, at Monmouth, Illinois. He is a 
son of David Calvin and Harriett (Payne) Templeton, natives of Illinois 
and Ohio, respectively. The death of the father occurred in 1899, after a 
successful and honorable life. The mother of our subject is still living, 
making her home with her children. She is a woman of most commendable 
personal characteristics and is held in highest regard by all who know her, 
and proved to be a worthy and faithful helpmeet to her husband. 

Samuel P. Templeton had an excellent education, and is a graduate 
of Hyde Park School, Chicago, and later studied at the University of In- 
diana, at Bloomington, for some time. F^rly in life he decided to be an 
embalmer, and with this end in view he entered Williams' School of Em- 



934 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

balming in Wisconsin, and there made an excellent record, graduating with 
the class of 1905. 

Thus well equipped for his life work he returned to Blooniington, In- 
diana, where he remained in this vocation for a period of five years and got 
a good start in life there. Seeking a larger field for the exercise of his 
talents he came to Crawfordsville and organized the D. C. Bamhill Com- 
pany, which is the largest undertaking establishment in western Indiana 
and does a ven* extensive and rapidly growing business. They have a neat 
and modernly equipped establishment, and prompt and high grade sen-ice 
is their aim. 

Mr. Templeton is a fine musician, having decided innate talent along 
this line, and he has spent much time in developing the same, and his wife 
is an accomplished singer. They are pleasant people to meet and have 
made a host of friends since taking up their residence in Crawfordsville. 
She was known in her maidenhood as Clara Halladay, and lived in Chi- 
cago. They were married on April 4, 1904. 

Mr. Templeton is prominent in fraternal circles. He belongs to the 
Masonic Order, including the Knights Templars and the Order of the 
Eastern Star, the Knights of Pythias, and Pythian Sisters, the Improved 
Order of Red Men, including Haymakers, the Daughters of Pocahontas, 
the Tribe of Ben-Hur, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Loyal 
Order of Moose. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON STEELE. 

One of the popular and successful native bom business men of Craw- 
fordsville, and a worthy scion of one of Montgomery county's honored old 
families is George Washington Steele, who has for many years conducted a 
dn.ig store here. He is a man of genial and obliging personality which, 
added to his known honesty, has rendered him a favorite with a wide circle 
of acquaintances and we are glad to herein set forth a brief resume of his 
industrious and commendable life record, for it shows what a man of de- 
tennination and right principles can accomplish, even in the face of ob- 
stacles. And it also shows that a man may be blessed with material success 
and at the same time maintain a proper integrity in social life and also assist 
in the general upbuilding of the community in which he resides, for Mr. 
Steele has ever manifested much interest in the growth of the county seat 
of the fair county of which this history deals. 



MdXTHOMKRV 



9d; 



The birth of Mr. Steele occurred in city and county on February i6, 
1862. He is a sun oi Iharles M. and hdiza 11. (Miller) Steele. The father 
was also a native of Crawfordsville, and from that early period, and even 
earlier, the name Steele has been a very familiar one in this locality. The 
paternal grandparents of our subject were Thomas M. and Elizabeth H. 
Steele. Charles Steele was reared and educated here and he followed farm- 
ing all his life in his native vicinity, dying in 1870. His wife, Eliza H. 
Miller, was also a native of Union township, Montgomery county. She 
was a daughter of William Miller, who came to Union tovvn.ship in tiie 
early twenties and had the distinctiuu of building the first house in Craw- 
fords\ille, on the present site of the heating plant, and here he estal)lished 
the future home of the family, whose name, like the Steeles, has been a house- 
hold word here for several generations. 

The death of the mother of the subject of this sketch occurred at 
Sunnyvale, California, in April, 1906, at the time of the great San Fran- 
cisco earthquake. 

George W. Steele grew to manhood at Crawfordsville and he received 
a good education in the local schools. Early in life he began business for 
himself, and here in his native city sold drugs for a period of twenty years, 
enjoying an extensive and lucrative business, but he abandoned that field of 
endeavor upon the organization of the Crawfordsville Trust Company, tak- 
ing the important position of manager of the insurance department, which 
place he still holds, having discharged his duties in an able and satisfactory 
manner, and the rapidly increasing prestige and importance of this well 
known concern has been due in very large measure to his able and judicious 
planning and counsel, and the indomitable energy which he has put into it. He 
is also a member of the firm of McDonald & Steele, florists, of Craw'fords- 
\ille, this firm having been organized in 1892, starting with only one acre. 
Xow they occupy eight acres on West Wabash street, and are doing a thriv- 
ing business that is rapidly increasing. They have modern and well arranged 
green houses here, where the choicest varieties of commercial flowers are 
grown. They maintain a downtown office in the Y. M. C. A. building. 
Their flowers are of such superior quality and they are so prompt and fair 
in filling orders that their business extends all over Indiana and into Illi- 
nois. They hold a very high rank as general florists. This firm was the 
first to grow roses and carnations in Crawfordsville. Their business now 
amounts to from twelve thousand dollars to eighteen thousand dollars an- 
nually; however, neither of the partners have ever given personal attention 
to it, but employ a competent manager. 



956 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Politically, Mr. Steele is a Republican, but he has never taken a very 
active interest in political matters, preferring to give his attention to his in- 
dividual affairs. 

Mr. Steele was married on April 10, 1888, to Frances L. Walter, the 
accomplished daughter of Henry Walter, a well known citizen of Wayne 
township, this county, and here Mrs. Steele grew to womanhood and re- 
ceived her education. 



FIELDEN E. MORIN. 

The general appearance of the fine and extensive landed estate of 
Fielden E. Morin, of Madison township, bespeaks for the proprietor a man 
of progressive ideas as well as indomitable energ}', and one who is thorough- 
ly familiar with every detail of agriculture. His land lies in Tippecanoe 
county, but he maintains his home at the village of Linden. In a quiet 
way he has done much to promote the industrial interests of this section of 
the Wabash country, and every public improvement or private enterprise 
for the good of the vicinity in which lie has long resided finds in him a 
zealous supporter and liberal jjatron. He is regarded as one of the best 
examples of modern twentieth century farming that could be found in the 
locality of which this history treats, and it is indeed a pleasure to look over 
his broad acres, well kept, productive fields, substantial, and attractive 
dwelling and other buildings. He is a man who believes in attending 
strictly to his own liusiness, and his good name has ever been above the re- 
proach of all. 

Mr. Morin was born in Montgomery county. Indiana, Deceml)er 12, 
1862. He is a son of Milton and Rachael (Rice) Morin. The father was 
bom on June 17, 1835. in Ohio, and his death occurred on February 7, 
1905. The mother of our subject was born on March 16, 1835, in Mont- 
gomery county, and her death occurred on December 25, 1873. Milton 
Morin came to i\Iontgomery county as a child, received a common school 
education and was married here, and the mother of our subject taught 
school in her native locality for a time when a young woman. The father 
devoted his life successfully to farming. Politically, he was at first a 
Whig, later a Republican. 

Five children were born to Milton Morin and wife, all still living, 
namely: Fielden, of this review, being the eldest; William; born January 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INIllANA. 957 

27, 1865; Melvina \'.. born September 2, i860; Anna B., born September 
13. 1868: Nancy A., born July 24. 1870, is the youngest. 

Melden Morin grew to manhood on the home farm, wlicre he worked 
hard when growing to manhood, but he found time to recei\e a gdnd cdin- 
mon school education. 

Mr. Morin was married on Octc)l)er 24. 1888, to Abiia lialstead. who 
was born in this county July 9, 1869. and here slie was reared to woman- 
hood and received a god education in the pubHc schools. She is a daughter 
of William W. and Rhoda (Coyner) Halstead, both nati\es of Indiana. 
The father was born January 10, 1S44 and he is still lixing. making his 
home at l\irk])atrick. His wife was l)(irn on July 22. 184". and she, too, is 
still living. They are the jjarents of eight children, six of whom are living 
at this writing, namely; Clyde \'., born May 4. 1868, died March 29. 1900; 
Alma, wife of Mr. Morin. of this rexiew ; Musetta, born September 4, 1871, 
died Xovember 8, 1890; William, born Septeml)er 2^. 1873; John Coyner, 
born July 16, 1876; Ruby, born March 17, 1880: Ivrnest M.. born January 
4, 1883; Josiah, born March 29, 1885. 

Two children ha\e been born to Mr. and Mrs. Morin, namely: Mabel 
A., born Xovember 2. 1889. is in college: and Musetta J., bom July 5, 
1891, is also in college. They are Iwth making splendid records for scholar- 
ship and are popular with the young people of their ac(|uaintance. 

Mr. Morin began farming for himself when a young man and this has 
remained his life vocation, paying particular attention to well-bred live stock, 
and for the past six years he has been raising Chester White hogs, with 
which he has made a pronounced success, those he ofifers for sale finding a 
very ready market, owing to their superior quality. He is the owner of a 
finely improved and veiy productive farm of four hundred and eiglity 
acres, nearly all tillable and w-ell tiled and otherwise well impro\'ed. This 
land lies just across the line in Tippecanoe county. There Mr. Morin con- 
tinued to live, carrying on general farming and stock raising on an exten- 
sive scale until in 1904 when he moved to his attractix'e home in Linden, and 
there he and his family still reside. He has not. howexer, been idle (hning 
these latter years, but has not been so deeply engrossed in Jiis farm and 
live stock as previously. His home in Linden is a commodious one. neatly 
furnished, and in the midst of spacious and attractive surroundings. 

Politically, he is a Republican, but he has never l)een active in public 
afifairs, preferring to devote his attention e.xclusively to his large farming 
and stock raising j)ursuits. He attends and sujiports the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. 



g^8 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JAMES S. KELLY. 

In examining the records of self-made men, it will inevitably be found 
that indefatigable industry has constituted ihe basis of their success. True 
there are other elements which enter in and conserve the advancement of 
personal interests, perseverance, discrimination and mastering of expedients, 
but the foundation of all achievement is earnest, persistent labor. At the out- 
set of his career James S. Kelly, grocer of Crawfordsville, and for many 
years one of our well known and progressive business men, recognized this 
fact and he did not seek any royal road to the goal of prosperity and inde- 
pendence, but began to work earnestly and diligently to advance himself, hav- 
ing been tiirown on his own resources when quite young, and the result is that 
he is now numbered among the successful and respected citizens of the 
city of his choice. It was a bitter experience he had to meet when facing 
the hard world as a tender boy. yet, such experience is what usually brings 
out the mettle of tlie soul and makes success in later life possil)le, and thus 
proves a blessing, in most instances, in disguise. 

Mr. Kelly was born on September 9, 1850, in Brooklyn, New York, 
and is a son of Patrick and Mary Kelly, botli natives of Ireland, tiie father 
being born there in 1808, and when young in years he came to America, 
locating in Brooklyn, New York, where he worked as a stone mason and 
contractor. His death occurred in 1857. His wife also grew up in the 
Emerald Isle, her birth having occurred there in 1814, and there they were 
married. Her death occurred in 1856. 

James S. Kelly was thus left an orphan when seven years of age. He 
came to Crawfordsville, Indiana, in 1859, and worked on a farm near here 
until 1863, when he went to ^^anderburg county, where, he became an 
employe of a large wholesale shoe Inisiness, remaining there eight years, 
each one finding him further advanced than the preceding year. However, 
longing for the freedom of the countiy he went back 'to the farm in 1871, 
in Montgomery county, on which he remained until 1881, this ten years as 
a general agriculturist and stock man being altogether satisfactory. He 
then came to Crawfordsville and started in the grocery business, in which 
he remained for a period of eighteen years, enjoying an extensive trade 
with the city and surrounding country. He was then in the shoe business 
with his formef success for a period of six years. Desiring once again to 
change his occupation, he abandoned merchandising and took up fire in- 
surance, which he followed for eight years, building up quite an extensive 



MO:'IT(U1MKRV CorXTV, INDIANA. 959 

patronage. I''inally. he returned to the grocery lousiness, wliicli lie is still 
engaged in at Crawfordsville. his large, neatly arranged, well kept store 
being one of the most popular of its kind in the county, and it is always 
stocked uith a choice line of staple and fancy groceries. It is located on 
West Main street. 

Politically, ]\Ir. Kelly is a Republican. He is a member of the Tribe 
of Ben-Hur and the Knights of Pythias, also the Patriotic Order Sons of 
America. He holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
has been a member of the official board for the past eighteen years, and 
treasurer for three years. He was for a period of three years purchasing 
agent for the Culver Hospital, giving satisfaction to all in this capacity. 

Mr. Kelly was married on March 7, 1888, to Sue C. Campbell, of near 
Cadiz, Ohio. She was torn in Westmoreland county, Pennsyh'ania, Octo- 
ber 19. 1852. She is a daughter of Thomas Campljell and wife, both of 
whom are deceased. 



ROBERT H. LARRICK. 

Robert H. Larrick. well known farmer and stock man of I'Vanklin 
township, whose span of life, covering sixty-four years, has been passed in 
Montgomery county, and who stands today as one ui the men whose li\es ha\e 
meant something more than to exist and accumulate projjcrty and whose 
impress has helped shape the lives of others toward a fuller realization of 
the responsibilities of this world, with an earnest desire to secure the ulti- 
mate happiness of his neighbors and acquaintances, is eminently deserving 
of mention in a work of the province of the one in hand, as we shall see by 
a perusal of the following paragraphs. 

Mr. Larrick was born on December 21, 1849, in Montgomery county, 
Indiana, and he is a son of I. N. and Elizabeth (Tillard) Larrick. The 
father was born in Ross county, Ohio, May 26, 1819, and his death oc- 
curred on January 22, 1887. The mother of our subject was born in Ohio 
in 1822. and her death occurred on July 31, 1889. These parents grew to 
maturity in their native state and there received a limited education and 
were married. They devoted their lives to farming, the father being also 
a stock buyer. They were the parents of seven children, three of whom 
are still living, namely: John. Robert, and Isaac; Mary, Emma, Horace, 
and Frank are deceased. 

Robert H. Larrick received a common school education and he grew 



960 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to manhood on the home farm in this county. On March 6, 1889, he was 
married to Rose HoUingsworth, who was born in this county on April 18, 
1 86 1, and here she grew to womanhood and received a common scliool 
education. 

Three children have been born to our subject and wife, namely : John 
W., born February 25, 1891, is on the home farm; James N., bom January 
30, 1893; Penson H., born January 13, 1901. 

Mr. Larrick has always followed fanning in Franklin township, and 
he has been very successful, being now the owner of a finely improved and 
productive farm of two hundred and five acres; however, only one hun- 
dred and twenty acres are tillable. His land lies just outside the town of 
Darlington. He has a pleasant home and substantial outbuildings. He 
handles a good grade of live stock, which he prepares for the market, and 
this forms no small part of his annual income. He is regarded as one of 
the most up-to-date general agriculturists in the vicinity of Darlington. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, but he has ne\er been especially active in 
public affairs. 



J. \V. DICKERSOX, M. D. 

There is no member of the Alontgoniery county medical fraternity who 
occupies a higher position in the estimation of the people than does Dr. J. W. 
Dickerson, of Wingate. During his many years of practice he has built up a 
very large patronage and he is regarded as a safe and honest general prac- 
titioner who is well abreast of the times and he is kept very busy. He realized 
early that there is a purpose in life and that there is no honor not founded on 
worth and no respect not founded on accomplishment. He has never de- 
pended upon others to do what he himself should do. While engaged in the 
prosecution of his own chosen work, he has never Iseen neglectful of the gen- 
eral welfare of the people of his locality and he has won and retained the 
esteem of all who know him. 

Dr. Dickerson was born on June 17, 1853 in Hendricks county, Indiana, 
near Danville. He is a son of Griffith and Elizabeth (Roy) Dickerson. The 
doctor's father was born in \^irginia in [811. He left the Old Dominion 
when a child and settled with the rest of the family in Hendricks county, 
Indiana, where he grew to manhood, was educated in the pioneer schools and 
he devoted his life to farming and stock raising. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 96I 

Tlie following children were born to Griffith Dickerson ami wife, only 
three of whom are still lixinj^-; tlie\- were named, John. TliDnias. Rebecca, 
Walker. Mrs. Mary Ross, Mrs. .\niy Laton, George. Dr. |. W. (imr sul>ject), 
Frederick; the next two were twins, and the youngest child died in infancy. 

Dr. Dickerson received a good common school education, later taking a 
course at Central College, at Indianapolis, and finally studied at the American 
Medical College in Cincinnati, remaining there four years and making an 
excellent record for scholarship. 

Dr. Dickerson was married on September 24, 1884, at Danville, Illinois. 
to Vona Chauncey, who was born on October 24, 1861. She is a daughter 
of David and Rosa (\\'el>ster) Chauncey. the former now deceased but the 
mother is still living. 

To the Doctor and wife one child has been born, namely: Roy C. who 
married Lula Crane, of Wingate, and they live in this place, he being engaged 
in business here. They have one child. John William. 

Dr. Dickerson started out in life on a farm. On Septeml)er i, 1876, he 
enlisted in the United States army, under Capt. F. W. Benteen. in Company 
H, Seventh Regiment, Western Cavalry, at Indianapolis. He at once became 
a member of the expedition that was sent to the hostile Indian country of the 
West, and he was in the campaign down the Missouri river that fall for the 
purpose of disarming the Indians that were supposed to have engaged in the 
battle of the Little Big Horn, in ^Montana, the preceding June. The Seventh 
cavalry was commanded by Col. S. D. Sturgis. They were in the ^'ellnw- 
stone expedition in 1S77 under the command of Col. X. .\. .Miles, being then 
in the Fifth Infantry. In 1878 our subject was with the tniops that escurted 
the Cheyenne Indians as far as the Black Hills, being then under tiie com- 
mand of Lieut.-Col. E. Otis. The Seventh Cavalry in 1879 changed from 
Fort A. Lincoln, to Fort Meade in the Black Hills. In 1880 our subject was 
a scout for twenty days in pursuit of the hostile Indians on the Little Missouri 
river, under Col. F. W. Benteen. In 1881 he was in camp on the Little .Mis- 
souri river, protecting that coun,try from the hostile Indians, and in .\ugust 
of that year Dr. Dickerson was honorably discharged. He proved, according 
to his comrades, to l)e a very courageous and faithful soldier, and he took 
part in a number of important campaigns against the Indians who gave the 
government so much trouble in those days. The doctor talks most interest- 
ingly of his experiences in the wild West tbirty-fi\e years ago. .\fter his 
career in the army he returned to the East and went into the drug business 
in Illinois, later he began the practice of medicine and surgerv in Rush countv, 
(61) 



962 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Indiana, where he built up a \ery large patronage. He came to Montgomery 
county on January i, 1894, and here he has remained to the present time, 
maintaining a well equipped office at the town of Wingate, Coal Creek town- 
ship. He has a large and constantly growing practice and has been very suc- 
cessful as a general practitioner and surgeon. 

Dr. Dickerson is a Democrat and is a loyal supporter of his party's prin- 
ciples. In religious matters he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and fraternally belongs to the Masonic Order at Wingate, the Knights of 
Pythias at Wingate, and the Tribe of Ben-Hur. 



S. A. HAMPTON. 



Franklin township, Montgomery count}-, has no more painstaking or 
skillful tiller of the soil than S. A. Hampton, who is deserving of rank 
among our best citizens, a statement in which all who have known him well 
during his life-long residence in this locality will readily acquiesce. For 
while laboring for his individual advancement, he has not been neglectful 
of his larger duties as a neighbor and citizen, always being willing to assist 
a brother toiler on the highway of life and to do his little part in keeping 
public affairs as pure as possible, not being of those, pessimistically in- 
clined, who believe that the "purification of politics is an irridescent dream." 
On the other hand, he has faith in the future, believing that the right and 
harmony must eventually prevail, however great may be the obstacles. 

Mr. Hampton was born in this county on February 8, 1868. He is a 
son of Samuel and Phoebe (Guntle) Hampton. The father was born in 
Tennessee on February 20, 1828, and his death occurred on April 12, 1907. 
The mother was born in Indiana on August 13, 1826, and her death oc- 
curred on August 28, 1889. These parents each grew up in their respective 
communities and received meager educational training in the old-fasiiioned 
schools. The father devoted his life to farnu'ng. Politically, he was a strong 
Democrat. 

Eleven children were born to Samuel Hampton and wife, nine of whom 
are still living. 

S. A. Hampton received a common school education. In August, 
1887, he was married to Ida Walton, who was born in Montgomery county 
on October 8, 1870. She is a daughter of Ayre Walton and wife, the father 



MONTGOMKKV COUNTY, INDIANA. 963 

having come from Jennings county. Mrs. Haiiiinou received a cnmmon 
school education. 

Two children have been Ixtrn to our subject and wife, namely: Cecil 
B., born September 25, 1888, married Flora Heffner, and they live on the 
Woody farm in Sugar Creek township; Ernest, born Novemljer 2y, iSyo, 
is living on the home farm, assisting his father with the work. 

Mr. Hampton has devoted his life to general farming and stock rais- 
ing; however, he was in business for awhile at Thorntown, later returning 
to Montgomery county and resumed farming, which he has carried on to 
the present da)', lie owns one place of eighty-five and twenty-four one- 
hundredths acres. His land is well improved and all tillable, and on his 
place stands a comfortable dwelling and convenient outbuildings. In con- 
nection with general farming he handles a good grade of live stock. 

Politically, he is a Democrat and is loyal to the colors wiiether in de- 
feat or victory. In 1910 he was placed on the advisory board of I""ranklin 
township. 



WILLIAM SIMPSON HARDING. 

We are glad to note in this series of biographical articles that so many 
of the progressive citizens of Montgomery county ha\e l)een born and reared 
here, for this is an indication of at least two things, namely, that they are 
men of keen discernment, being able to see and appreciate present-day condi- 
tions as tiiey are and that the county is indeed one of the favored sections of 
the great Hoosier commonwealth, else these people would have sought oppor- 
tunities elsewhere. As it is, they did not need to heed the call of the wander- 
lust that is heard at some stage or other in the lives of all young men. It very 
frequently leads them to forsake the "land of milk and honey"- and go in 
search of a never-to-be-obtained oasis of a mirage, ultimately finding instead 
the barren, sand-swept waste of a Sahara, often, too, after it is too late to 
return and establish themselves in their own nati\e heath. William Simp- 
son Harding, who is connected with the county surveyor's ofhce as field 
engineer, is one of the large number of boys of Montgomery county who 
have had the good judgment to remain right at home and devote their 
energies to the things with which they are most familiar, and labor among 
the people who know them and whom they know, hence they have had a l>et- 
ter opportunity of ultimately attaining the ever-sought- for guerdon — success. 

Mr. Harding was born in Union township. Montgomery county, Indi- 



964 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ana, May 7, 1869. He is a son of John A. and Elizabeth W. (Farrow) 
Harding. The father was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, September 7, 
1835, and came to Montgomery county with his parents when a lad and here 
grew to manhood and received his education. He was a son of Josiah Hard- 
ing, who was born in Maryland in the year 1801. The latter resided in his 
native state until attaining his twentieth year, when with his father Nathan 
he removed to Shelby county, Kentucky. Josiah Harding married Elizabeth 
Miller, daughter of Ellis Miller, who was a farmer and stock raiser in Ken- 
tucky, to which state he removed from Virginia about the year 1821. In 
1835 Josiah Harding came to Putnam county, Indiana, locating in Greene 
township, where he entered one hundred and sixty acres, and lived there for 
about two years when he settled in Putnam county, which was his home for 
twenty years. At the expiration of that time he moved to a farm two miles 
south of Crawfordsville, where he died in April, 1889. His wife, who was 
bom March 12, 1806, died. Josiah Harding was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and was, politically a Republican. He owned two hundred 
and forty acres of land in Montgomery county at the time of his death. His 
family consisted of five children, four of whom grew to maturity, among 
them the following: Charles W., who became a merchant; John A., father of 
the subject of this sketch ; Henry W., who also became a farmer. 

John A. Harding devoted most of his life to farming, but was for some 
time in the mercantile business in Crawfordsville, also in Leavenworth, Kan- 
sas. He is now living retired. He and Elizabeth W. Farrow were married 
in 1864. She was born in Putnam county, Indiana, March 10, 1844, and her 
death occurred in 1904. 

William S. Harding received a common school education, and he spent 
three years in Wabash College, after \\hich he clerked in Crawfordsville, for 
a period of ten years, for Smith & Morgan, druggists, giving them eminent 
satisfaction. He then entered the county surveyor's office, and has since 
been connected with it as field engineer. He has filled this position in a man- 
ner entirely satisfactor}' to all concerned. He is familiar with every phase of 
this line of endeavor. 

Fraternally, Mr. Harding is a member of the Masonic Order, belonging 
to the Blue Lodge, also belongs to the Knights of Pythias. In religious mat- 
ters he is a member of the Methodist church, and politically is a Republican. 

Mr. Harding was married on September 22, 1906 to Maude Mcintosh, 
who was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, June 5, 1877. Here she grew 
to woma,nhood and was educated. 



MONTOOMKRY COUXTY. INHIANA. {)()-, 



DR. M. H. LIDIKAV 



In reading- o\-er the record of the lives of Mianv of the leachnt;- citizens 
of a county one becomes impressed with the fact that certain families show 
at the outset their strong inclinations toward books and learning generally, 
or in at least keeping up with the times on current topics. Among the 
fanning community it is the rule, and not the exception, to find ordinary 
educations, but occasionally a family is met with that rises above the others 
in the scale of education and the capacity to grasp the larger questions of 
mental improvement. Such families are numerous in Montgomery county, 
and it is a sign that this locality is equal to any in the state in point of 
citizenship. One such is that represented by the subject of this sketch. Dr. 
M. H. Lidikay, well known veterinary physician, of Darlington, a man who 
is in ever)' way deserving of the large material success and the high regard 
of his neighbors which he enjoys for his life has been one of industry and 
honor. 

Dr. Lidikay was born on September 13, 1872, in Montgomery county, 
Indiana. He is a son of George E. and Mary (Grayville) Lidikay. The 
father was born in 1839 in Kentucky. For a full history of the Lidikay 
and Gravville families the reader is directed to the sketches of J. E. Lidi 
kay and Josephus Grayville, appearing elsewhere in this work. The father 
of our subject is still living, making his home in Kansas. The mother of 
the Doctor was born in Virginia and her death occurred in April, 1902. 
George E. Lidikay has always followed general farming, but is now leading 
a retired life. His family consisted of nine children, seven of whom are 
still living. 

Dr. Lidikay grew to manhood on the home farm, where he made him- 
self generally useful in his boyhood days, and he received a good common 
school education, later attending the Toronto Veterinary School at Toronto, 
Canada, where he made an excellent record and from which lie was gradu- 
ated with the class of 1907. 

He made his start on the farm, later engaged in business in Ladoga 
for awhile, then took up the study of veterinary surger\', and after proper 
preparation began the practice of his profession at Darlington, where he 
has since remained. He enjoys a large and rapidly growing patronage 
and has made a great success of his vocation, being regarded as one of the 
best in his line in the county, and he is kept very busy. He keeps well up 
with the times in all that pertains to his profession and is well equipped 



966 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

with instruments and apparatus for prompt and high grade service. He 
owns an attractive, modernly appointed nine-roomed dwelling in Darling- 
ton, and nearby, on the rear of his lot, is a substantial and convenient cement 
office and hospital. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, and, in fraternal affairs belongs to the 
Masonic Order at Darlington. 

On June 25, 1901, Dr. Lidikay married Mertie Lee Foster, who was 
born in Montgomery county, Indiana, July 24, 1875. She grew to woman- 
hood here and received her education in the common and high schools, and 
later she attended college at Covington, Indiana. She is a daughter of 
Henry Allen and Mattie E. (Allen) Foster. 

To our subject and wife three children have been born, two of whom 
are still living; they were named Mary Helen, the first born, is deceased; 
Henry A., born March 18, 1907: Harry Davis, born April 12, 1910. 



RICHARD C. HARPER. 

Few men of a past generation in Sugar Creek township, Montgomery 
county, sought any harder to advance the general good of his locality than 
the late Richard C. Harper, a man whom to know was to admire and re- 
spect, for he was the possessor of that peculiar combination of attributes 
which results in the attainment of much that is worth while in this world. 
He aimed to be progressive in what he did, was always in sympathy with 
enterprises having for their object the common good, and his influence was 
invariably exerted on the right side of ever}' moral issue. Like all men of 
positive character and independence of mind, he was outspoken in what he 
considered right, and his convictions were such that his neighlxjrs and fel- 
low-citizens knew well his position on all questions of a political, moral, and 
religious nature. His private life was exemplary and his amiable character 
and many virtues made him popular with all who knew him, and his passing 
away was regretted by all. 

Mr. Flarper was born on June 19, 1849, '" Hamilton county, Ohio, but 
most of Iiis life was spent in Montgomery county, Indiana, whither he was 
brought from the old Buckeye state, when six months old, by his parents, 
Silas and Maiy Jane (Allen) Harper. They were both natives of Ohio, 
the father having been born in Hamilton county, and there grew to man- 
hood, and when the Civil war came on was a soldier for the Union, and died 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 967 

while in the service. He had (ievntcil hi.s life to tarnlinJ,^ The su1)ject'.s 
parents had four children, only one of whom is now living; they were I-lliza- 
beth and Mary, both deceased: Angelina, living: and Richard C, suliject of 
this memoir. 

Richard C. Harper grew to manhood on the home place in this county 
and there he made himself generally useful during his boyhood days. He 
received a common school education. On October 21, 1875, 'i^ married 
Mahala Holloway. She was born in Clinton county, Indiana, on August 8, 
1857. She is a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Truett)' Holloway. Tlie 
father was born in this county, and he died in 1896. The mother was l)orn 
in Clinton county, Indiana, and her death occurred in Clinton county in 
1855. Mrs. Haq)er grew to womanhood in her nati\e conmumity and 
received a common school eflucation. 

Seven children, five of whom are still living, were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Harper, namely: Charles, born Septemlter 10, 1876, died I'^ebruary 7, 1902: 
Florence, born August 28, 1878, married Charles Hall, and they live in 
Urbana, Illinois: Clifford, born Novemljer 21. 1881, died October 18, igoo: 
Clella, born April 20, 1883, married Francis Hutchings, and they live in 
Champaign, Illinois: Wallace, born December 19, 1885, married Edna Hunt, 
and they live in Indianapolis; Lester B., born on July 9, 1887, is attending 
Wabash College in Crawfordsville : Harr\-, born March 19, 1889, lives on 
the home farm. 

Richard C. Harper began farming for himself early in life and that 
continued to be his vocation until his death, carrying on general farming 
and stock raising on feis finely improved and productixe farm of one hun- 
dred and forty acres, all tillable but about twenty acres of woods and pas- 
ture. Since his death, which occurred on October 29, 1905, Mrs. Harper 
has been operating the farm in a manner that has brought gratifying re- 
sults, successfully carrying out tlie plans her husl>and had inaugurated .and 
keeping up the excellent impro\ements which he made. 

Mr. Harper was contented to spend his life at home, looking after his 
family and his fann, and thus he never took much part in public affairs, 
merely being a consistent voter of the Republican ticket, b'raternally, he 
belonged to the Knights of Pythias at Darlington. He served the people 
of Sugar Creek township very faithfully as justice of the peace for a period 
of tweh-e years. His decisions were known for their fairness to all i)arties, 
and he ever sought to do the right as he saw and understood it in the light 
of dutv. He was an earnest church worker: in fact, was a pillar in the 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



local Methodist Episcopal congregation, of which he was long a member, a 
trustee and class leader. Neither his sincerity nor his honesty were ever 
assailed, and he merited in every way the high esteem that was accorded 
him bv all who knew him. 



WILLIAM. ENDICOTT. 

We rarely find two persons in everyday life who attribute their success 
in their different spheres to similar qualities. Hard work and plodding in- 
dustry paved the way for one, good judgment and a keen sense of value for 
another, intuition and a well balanced mind for a third. An admixture of 
some of the qualities above named, emphasized by hard work, has been 
responsible for the success of William Endicott, the popular and widely 
known restaurant proprietor of Crawfordsville, in his battle for the spoils of 
victory, these winning attributes having descended from a sterling ancestry 
who played no inconspicuous part in the early history of Montgomery county, 
having done their share of the rough work necessary to redeem the fertile 
fields from the wild state in which the first settlers found them and it is to such 
as these that we of today are greatly indebted for the good farms,, the thriv- 
ing towns and the good schools and churches to be found in every community. 

William Endicott was born in Franklin township, Montgomery county, 
Indiana, and he is a son of George and Amanda A. Endicott, a highly re- 
spected family who lived on a farm in that locality, and there the subject 
grew to manhood, assisted with the general work about the place when a boy 
and received a common school education. At an early age it became neces- 
sary for him to shift for himself. This early responsibility proved to be the 
making of him, although at the time somewhat severe, but it fostered in him 
self-reliance, fortitude, courage and perseverance. He first started to learn 
the machinist's trade, and with this end in view began working in Lyle & 
Smith's Foundry in Crawfordsville, later securing employment at the City 
Bottling Works. He then became a waiter in a restaurant at Crawfordsville 
Junction. He was enthusiastic over the work and made rapid progress. He 
later worked at the Union depot in Terre Haute, then returned to Crawfords- 
ville Junction in the same capacity, working for Charles Smith. He had 
by this time determined upon the restaurant business for his life work, and 
had not only mastered the ins and outs of the same but had saved his money 
and was thus enabled to purchase, on January i8, 1893 what was known as 




Wn>MAM ENDK'OTT 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 969 

the Big Four restaurant, at the corner of Phim and Franklin streets, Craw- 
fordsville. He and Mr. Smith buying the same in partnership, they 
continued to manage it successfully until 1904, when Mr. Endicott obtained 
charge of all dining cars between Columbus, Ohio, and Peoria, Illinois, taking 
active charge of the same on December 31, 1904, and he remained in that 
capacity until November 31, 1906, having made a financial success of the 
proposition and winning the hearty approbation of the traveling public. In 
January, 1906, he opened a restaurant on Main street, Crawfordsville, now 
known as the Northern Cafe. This is regarded as the principal and most 
popular restaurant in this city, Mr. Endicott having made a great success here 
where others failed. He makes a specialty of game and sea foods in season, 
and his motto is cleanliness and prompt service. Everything about the place 
is sanitary, inviting, systematic and up-to-date, in fact, this well patronized 
cafe would be a credit to cities much larger than Crawfordsville. He is de- 
ser\^ing of a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished in the face 
of obstacles, and he is well liked by all who know him. 

Mr. Endicott, although a very busy man, takes an abiding interest in 
public afifairs, and during the recent national campaign was a prime factor, 
locally, in the Progressive movement, and he had the distinction of serving 
as a delegate to the national convention of that party in Chicago. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 
493 ; also the Loyal Odrer of Moose, Tribe of Ben-Hur, the Eagles and Owls. 

Mr. Endicott was married on March 21, 1893 ^o Minnie A. Doyle, a 
native of Montgomery county, her birth having occurred in L'nion township, 
where her parents were well and favorably known, and where she grew to 
womanhood and was educated. To this union two children were Ixjrn. Her- 
man and Darrell, both in school. 



FRANK W. WAUGH. 



One of the most enterprising of the younger generation of farmers of 
Sugar Creek township, Montgomer}- county, who has believed from the out- 
set of his career that "the wisdom of yesterday is sometimes the folly of 
toda_\-," and that while the methods of our grandfathers in tilling the soil 
were all right in their da\-, _\et in the twentieth century we are compelled to 
adopt new methods and farm along different lines, in \icw of the fact that 
conditions of climate, soil, grains, etc., have changed since the days of the 



970 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

pioneers, is Frank W. Waugh. He has been a close observer of modern 
methods and is a student at all times of whatever pertains to his chosen life 
work, and he has therefore met with encouraging success all along the line, 
and, judging from his past record, he will undoubtedly achieve much in the 
future years and take his place among the leading agriculturists of a com- 
munity noted for its fine farms and adroit husbandmen. 

Mr. Waugh was born on March 13, 1872, in the township and county 
where he still resides. He is a son of Milton B. and Sarah E. (Saulsbury) 
Waugh. The father was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, and his 
death occurred on December 2D, 1904. The mother was born also in this 
county, and she was called to her rest on August 30, 1892. These parents 
grew to maturity in this locality, received common school educations and 
here they were married. They each represented old families, highly re- 
spected and well known in the pioneer epoch. Milton B. Waugh devoted 
his life to general farming in his native locality, and became well known as 
a raiser of well bred stock. Politically, he was a Republican and took an 
active interest in public affairs, being influential locally in his party. His 
family consisted of seven children, named as follows: James M., Emma O., 
John M., Mary L., Martha, Clara B., and Frank W., of this review, who is 
the youngest. 

Frank W. Waugh grew to manhood on the home farm in Sugar Creek 
township, and there he attended the common schools, later was a pupil for 
some time in Valparaiso College, Valparaiso, Indiana. On December 26, 
1895, he married Eleanor Stuckey, a representative of a well known family, 
an account of whose ancestry will be found on another page of this volume 
under the caption of Warren L. Stuckey. Mrs. Waugh grew to woman- 
hood in her native county and received a good education in the common 
schools. 

Two children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Mary 
Marie, born October 7, 1896: and Sarah Myrl, born .August 26, 1908, are 
both attending school. 

Mr. Waugh has always farmed in his native township, and he has met 
with a large measure of success as a general fanner and stock raiser. He 
makes a specialty of raising Hereford cattle and general bred live stock. He 
owns one hundred and sixty-four acres in this township and twenty-one and 
one-fourth acres in Clinton county. Of the home place.all is tillable but 
about ten acres. It is well tiled and otherwise well improved, and on it 
stands a good dwelling and outbuildings. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 9/1 

Politically. Mr. Waugh is a Republican, and ha,s been more or less 
acti\e in jjublic affairs. He was trustee of his township for one term, from 
1905 to 1909. Fraternally, be Ijelongs to the Masonic Order of Colfax, and 
religiously, be attends the Methodist church at Colfax. 



I. E. DYKES. 



The life of the twentieth century farmer is (|uitc ilifTerent from that 
of the tiller of the soil during the century that has only recently passed. 
Improved farming machinery is very largely responsible for this change, 
this improvement of condition, and yet if the present-day agricultural im- 
plements had been known to our grandfathers they would not have had the 
money to purchase them, for everybody was poor in those days. Another 
thing, the soil was at that time being redeemed from the wild state and 
was unsuited to the use of modern machinery. 

One of the successful young farmers of Sugar Creek township who is 
keeping abreast of the times is J. E. Dykes, who was born on December 9, 
1878, in the township and county where he still resides. He is a son of 
James and Louisa (Smith) Dykes. The father was born on April 11, 1841, 
five miles from Atlanta, Georgia, and there he grew to manhood and re- 
ceived his education, removing from there in 1865 to Boone county, In- 
diana, and subsequently coming to Montgomery county, and here establish- 
ing the permanent home of the family. His death occurred on Deceml>er 
29, 1910. He had been very successful as a general farmer. For a fuller 
mention of him the reader is directed to the sketch of Arthur Paddack. ap- 
pearing elesewhere in this work. 

Xine children were born to James D}'kes and wife, namely: Samuel 
A., born October J3, 1869: Mrs. Joanna Roots, born July 4. 1871 : Robert 
Martin, born December C>. 1873: Abner, l)orn July 2^,. T875, died August 9, 
1900; Olive May, who married a Mr. Paddack. was born April 6. 1877; 
James E., subject of this sketch: Donnie Belle, l)orn October 9, 18S0. died 
August 21, 1882: Mary Catherine, born May 21. 1882: Stella Flossie, born 
Februaiy 17, 1885, died September 23, 1910. 

J. E. Dykes received a common school education. He has been twice 
married, first, on March 23, 1899, to Stella Ollinger, who was born in 
Brown's Valley, this county, on November 4, 1873. and died July 10. 1902. 
Subsequently, Mr. Dykes married Carrie Johnson, on March 5, 1903. She 



972 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

was born on April ii, 1876. She is a daughter of Thomas H. and Alabama 
(Gray) Johnson. 

Two children were born of the subject's first union, namely : Gladys 
M.. born December 2y, 1899, ^""^ Clarence M., born November 13, 1900, 
are both in school. There has been no issue of the second union. 

Mr. Dykes has always farmed in Sugar Creek township, carrying on 
general farming and stock raising, making a specialty of good breeds of live 
stock, which finds a very ready market owing to their superior quality. He 
moved to his present farm in the fall of 1879. I* 's the old home place, and 
consists of one hundred and eighteen acres, all but six acres of which is 
under cultivation and it can all be tilled. It is well tiled, well fenced and 
otherwise well improved. 

Politically, Mr. Dykes is a Republican, and he belongs to the Christian 
church. He is a trustee of the church, and is superintendent of the Sunday 
school. 



JOHN ARTHUR PADDACK. 

John Arthur Paddack, a representative citizen of Sugar Creek town- 
ship, Montgomery county, belongs to the number who are today among its 
most enlightened and enterprising farmers. Beginning at the lowest round 
of the ladder, he has aimed high in his chosen vocation, and by ever looking 
upward, relying on his own responsibility, he has gradually worked his way 
through life until now he can begin to see the dawn of the time when he 
can be free from the daily cares and responsibilities that "fret and wear the 
soul," according to the poet, for life's work, while in a measure pleasurable, 
is to most, irksome and monotonous, and that man is, or should be, happy, 
who, when the autumn of life comes, can take things easy, looking backward 
on his career of industry and accomplishment. 

Mr. Paddack was born on March 24, 1871, in Madison township, Mont- 
gomery county. He is a son of Josiah and Caroline (Husted) Paddack. 
The father was born in Union county, Indiana, October 18, 1845, ^"d his 
death occurred on January 2, 1877. The mother was born in Union county, 
this state, in 1845, ^"d is still living in Darlington, Indiana. Their parents 
grew up in their native community and received common school educa- 
tions, and they spent their lives on the farm. Mr. Paddack having been a 
large farmer and stock raiser, and he was the first to bring fine short-horn 
cattle to this county, and he was one of the best known and most successful 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 973 

Stock men liere in his day. He was a loyal Republican. Init nut a public 
man, preferring to stay pretty close to his farm and home. His family con- 
sisted of five children, namely: Clyde, John Arthur, Cora L., I-'rank B., 
and Josie. 

John A. Paddack was reared on the home farm and there assisted with 
the general work when a boy. He received a good education in the com- 
mon schools, and on March 20, 1895, he was united in marriage to Olive 
M. Dykes, who was born in Montgomery county, April 6, 1877. She is a 
daughter of James A. and Louisa A. (Smith) Dykes. The father was born 
April II, 1841, and his death occurred on December 29. 1910. He was a 
native of Georgia. We quote the following from a local paper, printed at 
the time of the death of Mrs. Paddack's mother: 

"Louisa A. Smith was born in Mississippi, November 17, 1844. and 
died at her home, two miles west of Calfax, Indiana, August 27, 1901, aged 
fifty-six years, nine months and ten days. She was married to James 
Dykes January 16, 1869. To them were born nine children, seven of whom, 
with the husband, survive her, a son dying a little more than a year ago 
and a daughter in infancy. For several years Mrs. Dykes had been a great 
sufiferer, and her death had been apprehended for some time. 

"Although in pain almost beyond human endurance, when not under 
the influence of medicine, she was conscious and greeted her friends with a 
smile and kind word, and when asked how she was would say, 'I am resting, 
or did rest easy,' which ever it might be. never complaining but always 
patient and often thinking and suggesting things to be done for other suf- 
ferers. 

"She united with the Christian church at Colfax in June, 1900. and 
it was a great pleasure to her to worship there when her health permitted. 
On the afternoon of the last meeting day her pastor and the choir came to 
her home and prayed and sang. She listened with tears rolling down her 
cheeks and looking into the face of one of the watchers after her eyes had 
been raised hea\'enward, said, 'I am all right.' 

"She was ready to go and often w ished for death to relieve her of her 
misery. She is not dead but sleepeth, and if we could raise the veil and 
look into eternity a frail hand would beckon us on. Some day we'll cross 
the dark waters and meet mother with arms outstretched to welcome us to 
our Saviour's home." 

To John A. Paddack and wife one child was born. Reed D. Parldack, 
born April 29, 1899,' who is now in school. 



974 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Paddack has always engaged in farming and stock raising. He 
owns one hundred and twenty acres in Sugar Creek township, which is all 
tillable but three or four acres. It is fairly well tiled and otherwise im- 
proved and he has a comfortable home. He is making a specialty of Barred 
Plymouth Rock chickens and Poland China hogs. 

Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic Order at Darlington, and is a 
member of the Horse Thief Detective Association. He is a member of 
the Potato Creek Methodist Episcopal church, and is superintendent of the 
Sunday school there. Politically, he is a Progressive. 



DAVID MYER. 



David Myer, one of the enterprising farmers of Wayne township, 
Montgomery county, is one about whom it is a pleasure to write. He is 
modest in his opinion of himself, not claiming the worth and importance 
that others are ready and anxious to ascribe to him. He is cjuiet and unas- 
suming in manner, as such characters always are, and holds the high place 
which has been given him in the public favor by right of what he is, and 
not of what he claims. It is a grateful task to write of such an one, and 
the only danger is, that sufHcient merit will not be ascribed; yet the hearts 
of his friends, and they are very many, will supply any lack of words on the 
part of the writer, or any failure to express happily the true thought. 

Mr. Myer was born in Ohio on October 13, 1845. He is a son of 
William and Hannah (Kimball) Myer. The father was a native of Ohio, 
where he grew to manhood, was educated and spent his earlier years, com- 
ing to Fountain county, Indiana, in 1853, where he lived nine years, then 
removed to Jones county, Iowa, where he spent the rest of his life, dying- 
there many years ago. He spent his entire life on a farm, was a hard 
worker and an honest man. His family consisted of ten children, named as 
follows : Benton, who lives in Oklahoma City. Oklahoma ; David, of this 
review ; Jane. William, Evelyn, and John are all deceased ; Julia and Emma 
are living; Mary is deceased; Albert lives in Oklahoma City. 

David Myer grew to manhood on the home fami and assisted with the 
general work on the same when a boy. He received a good common school 
education in the schools of Cain township, Fountain county. Early in life 
he took up farming, and has remained active in the same to the present 
time. He is the owner of a well improved and productive farm of one 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. y75 

hundred ami sixty acres in Wayne townsliip. where he carries on general 
fanning and stuck raising. He has a comfortable home and convenient out- 
buildings. 

Mr. Myer was married on February i. 1866, to Maria Bever, daugh- 
ter of Henery and Mary (Heiston) Bever. They were early settlers of 
Fountain county, the family having been well known there since the pioneer 
days. 

Nine children have been born to our subject and wife, named as ful- 
lows: Ellen, Alice, David, Emma, Martha, Harry. Howard, Henry and 
Bertha. 

Mr. Myer is a member of the advisory board of his township. While 
living in Fountain county he was one of the county commissioners for a 
period of three years, and was also justice of the peace for a period of 
twelve years. As a public servant, he has ever been most faithful in the 
discharge of his duty and has given eminent satisfaction to all concerned. 
He is a member of the New Light Cliristian church. 



WILLIAM SNOW. 



William Snow, wideh' known and highly respectetl as one of the most 
energetic, self-reliant and enterprising citizens of Madison township, Mont- 
gomery county, has for several years been intimately associated with the 
best interests and upward progress of his neigh Ixjrhood, and to his assist- 
ance is due many of the valuable and permanent improvements of the local- 
ity, for he has taken much interest in the affairs of his adopted community 
and has made many wann friends since coming here. 

Mr. Snow was born in Vermillion county, Illinois. April 17, 1866. He 
is a son of Abner and Ellen (Ashmore) Snow, both natives of Illinois, where 
they grew to maturity, were educated and married. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject came from Vermont to Vermillion county, Illinois, in 
a very early day, being among the pioneer settlers there. The Snow family 
has been one of the Ijest known in that county from the days of the first 
settlers to the present. 

Five children were lx)rn to Abner Snow and wife, namely: Albert, 
Jessie, William (our sul)ject), Lucias, and Bertha. They are all living at 
this writing. 

William Snow grew to manhood in Vermillion county, Illinois, and 



976 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

there he received his education in the common schools. Early in life he 
took up farming and soon had a good start in life, and he continued to follow 
general agricultural pursuits with much success until 1910, when he moved 
to Montgomery county, locating in Madison township, where he still re- 
sides, owning a well improved and productive farm of one hundred and 
eighty-one acres, with a good dwelling and good outbuildings. 

Mr. Snow was married on February 27, 1889, to Julia Chandler, daugh- 
ter of James and Zerelda (Bennett) Chandler. They were natives of Ken- 
tucky, where they grew to maturity, were educated and married, and from 
there they came to Vermillion county, Illinois, in an early day and became 
well established through their industry. 

Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Snow, namelv : Orval, 
Vohn, Ura, Varmen, Fay, and Thelma. 

Politically, Mr. Snow is a Republican. l)ut he has never sought or held 
public office. Fraternally, he belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons at 
Linden; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Fairmount, Illinois; and 
the Modern Woodmen of America at Jamaica, Illinois. 



FRANK STACKHOUSE, M. D. 

One often hears the assertion, "This is an age of specialists." And the 
familiar sentence is certainly a true and incontrovertable one. It has not 
been so very long ago when "jack of all trades" was as common as the first 
quoted line, now one seldom hears it. The professional man, especially, the 
same as the mechanic, that does not specialize wins no more than mediocre 
success, if that, for competition is relentlessly fierce everywhere and he who 
covets pronounced success in anything must be able to do whatever he under- 
takes not only better but with greater despatch than his competitors. A few 
decades ago when a person received from some of the comparatively few 
medical colleges of the land his degree of Doctor of Medicine he was sup- 
posed to be able to correct most all kinds of the ills of which flesh is heir 
and he was called upon for everything. He did the best he could, according 
to his limited knowledge, and as might have been expected that "best" was 
miserable failure in many cases. But science, one of the most potent of 
modern gods to which humanity of the twentieth century bows, arose from 
his lethargic repose of centuries and cried, "Onward," and today we note a 
wonderful transformation. In no one branch of science, perhaps, has there 




DR. FRANK STACKHOUSE 



.-lONTtlOMERY COl-NTV, IMIIA.VA. 977 

been greater develupnient and specialization than in medicine. 'I'lie old fam- 
ily doctor no longer treats all ills. We go to many ditYerent specialists, and. 
of course, get quick and, as a rule, satisfactory results. 

One of the most successful and widely known specialists in Montgom- 
ery county is Dr. Frank Stackhouse, of Crawfordsville, who maintains a 
splendidly equipped and popular sanitarium here, to which hundreds of 
patients annually come, and they are all unstinted in their praise of the 
Doctor and his rapidly growing institution. 

Dr. Stackhouse was born on May 2, 1865, in Orange count}, Indiana. 
He is a son of Sanford and Lydia (Harris) Stackhouse. The father was 
born in Breckinridge countx'. Kentucky, in 1828, and the mother's birth oc- 
curred in Orange county, Indiana, in 1830. She ,grew to womanhood in her 
native county, was educated antl married there. Sanford Stackhouse was a 
well educated man, and he followed school teaching as a life work, in which 
he was very successful, his services being in great demand wherever he was 
known. His death occurred at Decatur, Illinois, at which city his wife also 
died. 

Dr. Stackhouse received excellent educational advantages. After pass- 
ing through the common schools and spending one year in the normal at 
Terre Haute he began life for himself by teaching school, which he fol- 
lowed with much success and satisfaction to all concerned for a period of 
seven years. Finally, tiring of the school room and believing that his true 
bent lay in another direction, he began the study of medicine, in which he 
made rapid progress. In 1893 he entered a medical school in Indianapolis, 
Indiana, where he made a splendid record, and was graduated in 1896. He 
first began practice at Gates, Indiana, remaining there for a period of thir- 
teen years, during which he enjoyed a wide and ever growing patronage. 
Then he took a special course of one year in chronic diseases, after which 
he located in Crawfordsville, where he has since remained and has gradually 
built up one of the most satisfactory practices of any of the local medical 
men and now has an eighteen-room sanitarium, well arranged, sanitary, con- 
venient and equipped with every modern and approved device and apparatus 
for the successful carrying on of his special line of practice. He now does 
only office practice, confining himself to the treatment of catarrhal and chronic 
diseases. He is meeting with pronounced success, and hundreds of patients 
who emerge annually from his now noted sanitarium are unstinted in their 
praise of this Ijenefactor of the human race. 

Fraternally, the Doctor is a Mason, haxing attained the degree of 
(62) 



978 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Isjiights Templar. He also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and the Modern Woodmen of America. He belongs to the United 
Brethren church. 

Dr. Stackhouse was married to Lula A. Marshall, of Fountain county, 
Indiana, in February, 1900. She grew to womanhood in this locality and 
received a good education here. To this union one child has been born, 
Doris B.. who is in school. 



GEORGE MAHOY. 



We are glad to write of a man who has lived for something more than 
the mere hoarding of dollars, although it would seem that necessity makes 
this the first requirement, but in supplying our natural wants it is not neces- 
sary to neglect all other of life's good things, such as helping one's neigh- 
bors, cultivating the mind, making better the moral and spiritual attributes 
and, in short, living as the Creator intended for us to live. One of the highly 
respected families of Montgomery county, whose members have tried to do 
their full duty in the affairs of the locality since they came here in the 
pioneer epoch is the Mahoy famil^^ who are certainly deserving of our at- 
tention at this time, one of the best known of the present generation being 
George Mahoy, successful farmer of Sugar Creek township, whose name 
forms the caption of this sketch. 

Mr. Mahoy was born in this township and county on April 5, 1856, 
and here he has been content to spend him life. He is a son of George and 
Lydia (Daugherty) Mahoy. These parents were both born in the state 
of Ohio, the father in 1820. There they grew to maturity, received meager 
educations, and were married, and they spent their lives engaged in farm- 
ing, coming to Montgomery county in an early day and establishing the 
permanent home of the family in Sugar Creek township. The death of the 
father occurred on April 5, 1875. They were the parents of twelve children, 
six of whom are living, namely: Mrs. Margaret Hulvey, Mrs. Alice Cook, 
Mrs. Vena Gray, Mrs. Iva Boots, Joe, and George, of this review. 

Mr. Mahoy was married on August 22, 1889, to Margaret Baer, who 
was born on- February 28, i860, in Tippecanoe county, Indiana. She is a 
daughter of Joseph and Ada (Summers) Baer. The father's death occurred 
in 1884. The mother was born on January i, 1830, and died in 1904. 



MOXTCJOMKRV Ci:)UXTV. INDIANA. 979 

Mrs. Mahoy grew to uomanliood in tlie natixe coniniunity and recei\ed 
her education in the common schools. 

Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mahoy, nanicl)- : Wiliartl, 
born Februarv i, 1890, is at home: Harry O., born Decemlier 14, i8()i. died 
March 18, 1894: Zola F., liorn December 20, 1894, is at liome : Mary IC, 
born June 30, 1897, is attending scho(-il : Haven, born August 11, 1901, is 
also attending school. 

Mr. Mahoy has always followed farming, mo\ing on his present jilace 
in the spring of 1901. prior to that he had lived for two years on a farm 
near Garfield, Indiana, and before that in Tippecanoe county. He is the 
owner of eighty acres, all tillable, well fenced and well tiled and otherwise 
properly improved, and he carries on general farming and breeding, keeping 
an excellent grade of live stock, and no small part of his annual income is de- 
rived from this source. He understands well the care and handling of stock 
and takes a delight in this kind of work, and his fine stock is much admired 
by all. He has a good home, which he liuilt himself. 

Politically, Mr. Mahoy is a Republican; fraternally, a member of the 
Knights of Pythias at Darlington, and he is a member of the Potato Creek 
Methodist Episcopal church, being a trustee of the same. 



NATHAX C. TURXIPSEED. 

Examples that impress force of character on all who study them are 
worthy of record in the annals of history wherever they are found. B}- a 
few general observations the biographer hopes to convey in the following 
paragraphs, succinctly, and yet without fulsome encomium, some idea of 
the high standing of the late Nathan C. Turnipseed, for many years one of 
the well knowm and successful farmers and stock men of Sugar Creek town- 
ship, Montgomery county. Those who remember him best w'ill readily 
acquiesce in the statement that many elements of a solid and ])ractical nature 
were united in his composition and which during a series of years brought 
him material success and the high regard of his fellow men in the locality 
of which this volume deals, his life and his achievements earning for him a 
conspicuous place among his compeers. He was a man of kind impulses, 
neighborly, indulgent to his family- and sought to carry into his every-day 
life the precepts of the Golden Rule, and was therefore a fit man to pattern 
after if we would be both successful and honored. 



980 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Turnipseed was born on October 15, 1855, '" ^Highland county, 
Ohio. He was a son of Thomas and Mary (Chaney) Turnipseed. The 
father was born on May 19, 1830. in Ohio, and died on April 22, 1869. 
The mother was born on February 8, 1831, and died on March 30, 1875. 
The father of our subject was a mason by trade, which he followed in con- 
nection with farming. His family consisted of seven children, only one of 
whom is living at this writing. 

Nathan C. Turnipseed received a common school education. When 
about twenty-one years old he removed from his native state to Montgom- 
ery county, Indiana, and here he spent the rest of his life, engaged in gen- 
eral farming and raising and breeding live stock. On December 2, 1879, 
he was united in marriage to Martha Boots, who was born June 24, 1859, 
in Montgomery county, and she grew to womanhood in Sugar Creek town- 
ship. She is a daughter of Asa and Elizabeth (Rice) Boots. The father 
was born on May 10, 1820, in Ohio, and his death occurred on December 
29, 1902. The mother was also born in Ohio, in 1824, and her death oc- 
curred in April, 1861. To these parents five children were born, two of 
whom are still living. They were named : Anna is deceased ; Ella is de- 
ceased ; Charlotte is deceased : George is living ; and Martha, widow of the 
subject of this memoir. 

Mrs. Turnipseed receeived a good common school education. She has 
five children, named as follows: Clarice, born July 6, 1880, married Will- 
iam Jobe, and they live in Kansas; Eleanor, born February 8, 1882, mar- 
ried Frank Custer, a fanner of Sugar Creek township; Marie, born Angus?' 
19, 1884, is living at home with her mother; Asahal, born May 13. 1893, 
is also at home; and Thomas B., born on March 2. 1896, is still a member 
of the family circle. 

Mrs. Turnipseed is the owner of a valuable and productive farm of 
two hundred and fifty-three acres in Sugar Creek township, which is well 
improved and on which stand a good set of buildings. She is a woman of 
more than ordinary business ability and is carrying on general farming and 
stock raising on an extensive scale. 

The death of Nathan C. Turnipseed occurred on February 17, 1913. 
He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He held 
membership at the Potato Creek Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
was a trustee for many years. He was a Republican in politics, was active' 
in party affairs, and held several offices in the county. He was highly es- 
teemed by all who knew him and was a good and praiseworthy citizen in 
every respect. 



MOXTGOMERV COrXTV, 



lOlIX L, (iRAIIA.M 



Anotlicr of tlie llirifly and dcser\ iiiy tillers uf ihe snjl in Sns^ar Creek 
township, ]\lontgomerv county, whom the biographer deems worthy of an 
extended notice in this work, for reasons which are too apparent to need 
comment, is John L. (iraliam, a man who has never permitted discourage- 
ments and obstacles to thwart him in his race for material success, which is 
rightly one of the chief aims of all normal, right-minded men, and, be- 
cause of his honesty in his general dealings with the world, he has been 
deserving of whatever of good has come his way. 

]\Ir. Graham was born on November 3, 1869, in Shelby county. In- 
diana, where his early boyhood was spent, he having been about thirteen 
years old when, in 1882, he accompanied his parents to JNIontgomery county, 
in which place he has since resided. He is a son of Richard and Ruth 
(Parrish) Graham. The father was Ixirn near Dublin, Ireland, but when a 
boy he emigrated to the United States, where he spent the rest of his life, 
dying on November 24, 191 1, at the age of seventy-four years, his birth 
having occurred in 1836. The mother of our subject was born on March i, 
1834, in Marion county, Indiana, and her death occurred on May 28, 1899, 
when sixty-five years old. The education of Richard Graham was very 
limited, he having attended school about three wrecks out of each year when 
a bov. His family consisted of only two children, lx)th still living, namely: 
James O., born July 11, 1866, married a Miss Musgrave, and they live in 
Indianapolis, and John L., of this review. 

John L. Graham grew to manhood on the home farm and was a \cry 
busy boy. He received a common school education. He was first married 
on March 22, 1892, to Mary King, whose death occurred on June 4, 1906, 
when in the prime of life, she having been born on November i, 1872, near 
where our subject is now living in Montgomery county. She was a daugh- 
ter of John W. and Maria (Pedrick) King, the former still living, the 
mother being deceased. 

To the first union of our subject and wife four children were l)orn. 
one of whom is deceased; they were named: Belva, born January 22, 1895, 
is living at home; Mabel, born May 2, 1898, is in high school; Ruth, born 
August 16, 1900, is attending graded school. Mr. Graham later married 
on April 12, 191 1, his second wife being Armenta Patton, a widow, whose 
first husband was James Harriman, who died when comparatively young. 
Our subject's second wife was born on May 26. iS^S, in this county, and 



9o2 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

here she grew to womanhood and recei\'ed a common school education. She 
is a daughter of John and Nancy (Coons) Patton, both parents being de- 
ceased. 

Mr. Graham began farming for himself early in life and he has con- 
tinued in this field of endeavor ever since; in connection with general farm- 
ing he has devoted a great deal of attention to the raising of good live stock 
of various kinds. He formerly lived about a half mile east of his present 
place on a farm of one hundred and thirteen acres. He sold out in 1912 
and purchased the place where he now lives, consisting of one hundred and 
twenty-two acres in Sugar Creek township. It is all in excellent condition, 
well tiled and otherwise well improved. It is a well located place and 
productive and on it stand good buildings. 

Politically, Mr. Graham is a Democrat, but he has never been very 
active in political affairs. He is an active member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and is steward in the local congregation. 



DAVID C. CAMPBELL. 

One of the large land owners and progressive citizens of Sugar Creek 
township, jMontgomery county, is David C. Campbell, a man who is a be- 
liever in modern methods of agriculture so far as they are applicable to 
local conditions, for he believes in getting out of the old ruts and forging 
ahead with the times. But it is to be expected that a man who has traveled 
and observed and read as much as he would be an advocate of whatever is 
new and at the same time utilitarian. Such men make for the general ad- 
vancement of any community. 

Mr. Campbell was born on June 4, 1855, in Buchanan county, Iowa. 
He is a son of Martin and Emiline (Cameron) Campbell. The father was 
born on January 22, 1830, having enjoyed the distinction of being the first 
white child born in Sugar Creek township, Montgomery county, Indiana, 
his parents having moved here on October 30, 1829, and established their 
home in the wilderness, beginning life here in true pioneer fashion, and here 
amid the rugged scenes of the first settlers the father of our subject grew to 
manhood, working hard in assisting his parents to establish the family home 
in the wilderness, and here he received a meager schooling in the early log 
cabin school houses of his day. He has de\'oted his life to general farming 
and has been successful. He is now living quietly at his home at Clark's 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INDIANA. 983 

Hill, liaving attained the advanced age of eighty-three years. His wife was 
born in 1835 in Chntt>n cminty. Indiana, ant! her tleath occurred on Xo\eni- 
ber 8. 1903. 

Ten children, seven of whom are still living, were born to Martin 
Campbell and wife, namely: John is deceased; David C, of this review; 
W. S., physician in California; Abner B., Mrs. Rose B. Harter. Nancy J. 
is deceased; Mrs. Susan Dell, R. N., a physician and chairman of the board 
of health, and Minerva. 

David C. Campbell grew to manhood on the home farm and there he 
assistetl with the general work when a boy, and he recei\ed a common 
school education. On February 14, 1876, he was married to Alargaret 
Oglebay, who was born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, March 17, 1856, 
and is a daughter of James and Rebecca (Conrow) Oglebay. The father 
was from Maryland and the mother hailed from Ohio. Mrs. Campbell re- 
ceived a common school education. 

Eleven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Campbell, namely : 
Eva Belle, born December 28, 1877; Jessie, born February 10, 1879; John 
W., born August i, 1881 ; James M., born December 31, 1883; Edith Elea- 
nor, born March 8, 1886; Bessie E., born January 12, 1888; Letha Rose, 
born February 5, 1891 ; Ester Fay, born September 4, 1896; Benjamin 
Floyd, born March 24, 1900, is in school; the other two children are de- 
ceased. 

Mr. Campbell began farming early in life and this has continued to be 
his chief line of endeavor; however, he has been a minister in the Brethren 
church for the past thirty-two years, during which time he has traveled ex- 
tensively and appeared in many pulpits, doing a great work in this denom- 
ination, being regarded everywhere as an earnest worker and forceful and 
pursuasive as well as an entertaining speaker and he is popular with a \ast 
acquaintance. He also traveled for several railroad companies for seven or 
eight years, giving entire satisfaction in this connection, and he is at this 
writing in the employ of the Union Pacific and Oregon Short Line. 

The finely improved place on which Mr. Campbell lives consists of 
ninety-seven and one-half acres, which is well tiled and all tillable, all the 
excellent improvements having been made by our sutjject himself. He is 
also owner of a fine and productive farm of four hundred and fifty-six 
acres southwest of Crawfordsville. 

Personally, Mr. Campbell is a man of scru])ul(ius honesty and charit- 
ably inclined. He is neighborly, genial and kind, and numbers his friends 
only by the limits of his acquaintance. 



984 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

• OMER DORRIS NASH. 

It is the progressive, wide-awake men of affairs who make the true 
history of a community, and their iniiuence as potential factors of the body 
politic is diificult to estimate. The examples such men furnish of patient 
purpose and steadfast integrity strongly illustrate what is in the power of each 
to accomplish, and there is always full measure of satisfaction in adverting 
even in a casual manner to their achievements in advancing the interests of 
their fellow men and in giving strength and solidity to the institutions which 
tell so much for the prosperity of the community. In every life of honor and 
usefulness there is no dearth of incident and yet in summing up the career of 
any man the biographer needs touch only those salient points which give the 
keynote to his character. Thus in setting forth the life record of Omer 
Dorris Nash, an enterprising young man of Crawfordsville, Indiana, suffici- 
ent will be said to show what all who know him will freely accjuiesce in, that 
he is one of the deserving, capable and honorable citizens of Montgomery 
county. Such a life as his is an inspiration to others who are less courageous 
and more prone to give up the fight when obstacles thwart their way, or their 
ideals have been reached or definite success has been obtained in any chosen 
field. In the brief life history of Mr. Nash are found evidences of char- 
acteristics that always make for advancement, achievement and success — 
persistency coupled with fortitude and lofty traits, and as the result of such 
a life he has won a host of friends since taking up his residence here, and 
is achieving material success. 

Mr. Nash was born in Brownsburg, Indiana, October 18, 1882, and he 
is a son of George and Amanda (Herring) Nash. The father who is also a 
native of Brownsburg, born there in the year, 1858, is now living retired, hav- 
ing spent his active life successfully engaged in farming. He is well known in 
his native county and is highly respected there. His wife, Amanda Herring, 
was born near Brownsburg in i860. There they both grew to maturity, re- 
ceived their educational training and were married. 

Omer D. Nash grew to manhood in Brownsburg, and there he received 
his early education in the public schools, working on the home farm during 
the summer months. He learned telegraphy at which he worked for about 
eighteen months, then attended the Clark Embalming School at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, from which he was graduated, having inade a splendid record there. 
Desiring to further his knowledge of this science, to learn every phase of the 




O. D. NASH 



MONTGOMliRV COL'XTV. INDIANA. 985 

same and to render liis work superior lo that of liis contemporaries he went 
to Chicago where he took the course in the Barnes Eml)alming SchooL 

Thus well equipped for his life work he returned to Brownsl)urg and 
engaged in the undertaking and furniture l>usiness for a period of three 
years, building up a good business. Seeking a wider field for the exercise of 
his talents he went to Indianapolis and took a position as enibalmer and 
funeral director with the large establishment of Finn Brothers, where he re- 
mained for a period of five years, giving his employers entire satisfaction and 
furthering his knowledge of the ins and out of his chosen vocation. He 
then came to Crawfordsville and engaged in business for himself at uo 
North Green street, where he is still located. He enjoys a large and growing 
business, and promptness and high grade service are his watch words. 

Fraternally, Mr. Nash is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, the ]Modern Woodmen of America, and the 
Patriotic Order Sons of America. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is a 
member of the Christian church. 

Mr. Nash was married on April ii, 1905, to Grace Hughes, of Browns- 
burg, her birth having occurred there on April i, 1883. She is a daughter of 
Everett T. and Alice (Ohaver) Hughes, a highly respected family there. 



LUCIEN D. COYXER. 

Nearly three-quarters of a century has dissolved in the mists of the ir- 
revocable past since Lucien D. Coyner, venerable farmer of Sugar Creek 
township, first saw the light of day, being a wortliy son of a i)ioneer family, 
who braved the wilds of Montgomery county when settlers were few and 
little improvement had taken place. He has lived through one of the most 
remarkable, and in many respects the most wonderful, epoch in the world's 
history. There will never be another like it. for it embraced the period 
when the strong-armed home-seekers from tlie Eastern states invaded the 
great Middle West, the Coyners being among the number, and redeemed this 
fertile section of our hemisphere from the wilds, bringing it up through 
various stages to its present high state of cultivation and civilization. To 
all these changes in Montgomerj' county, Mr. Coyner has been a most in- 
terested spectator, never by any means sitting passively by and watching 
others do the work, he having at all times sought to do his full share in the 
work of progress in the locality which his father selected as the spot on 



986 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

whicli to build the family's future home. He talks most interestingl}' of the 
early days when customs and manners were different, men and women 
were different, everything, in fact, unlike what our civilization is today. He 
and others of our patriarchal citizens are of the opinion that those were 
better, at least happier, times than now, and this is, in the main, true. 

Mr. Coyner was born on October .13, 1839, in Montgomery county, In- 
diana, and here he has been content to spend his long and industrious life. 
He is a son of John D. and Delila (Peterson) Coyner. The father of our 
subject was torn on August 3, 1810, in Virginia, from which state he re- 
moved to Indiana when a young man, locating in Montgomery county, 
where he married and here spent the rest of his life, and died on his farm 
hear on October 17, 1895. The mother of our subject was born in 1818 in 
Ohio, from which state she came to Indiana when a young girl and here 
her death occurred in 1844. John D. Coyner was a tanner by trade, which 
he followed in connection with farming; however, toward the latter part of 
his life he turned his attention exclusively to general- farming. His family 
consisted of eleven children, nine of whom are stiU living, namely: George 
W., who was a soldier in the Union army, died while in the service at New 
Orleans, Louisiana; Lucien D., subject of this sketch, was second in order 
of birth; M. P. was the third; and Delila is deceased; William was next in 
order; Jacob is deceased; Jesse, Seymour, David, Mary and Joseph are the 
younger children. 

Lucien D. Coyner grew to manhood on the old homestead and, being 
a pioneer child, he found plenty of hard work to do in assisting his father 
develop the farm from the wilderness. He received such education as the 
pioneer schools of his time afforded. On October 6, 1861, he married Mar- 
tha A. Bowers, who was born in this county on May 20, 1841, her family 
also being early settlers, she being a daughter of Edmond and C. (Drow- 
linger) Bowers, who came here from Ohio. Mrs. Coyner grew to woman- 
hood and was educated in her native community. 

Six children have been born to \lr. and Mrs. Coyner, namely : George 
died March 24, 1901 ; Violet, who married W. O. Armsby, died in 191 1; 
Charlotte; W. T. and Stella, twins; Lei is at home. 

Mr. Coyner began farming for himself when a young man and he has 
lived on his present farm in Sugar Creek township since 1871, which place 
consists of fifty-seven and one-half acres, all tillable, well fenced and well 
tiled. He cleared this land and built his own residence and outbuildings. 

Politicallv, Mr. Covner is a Democrat and has voted for thirteen dif- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, LN DIANA. 987 

ferent Presidents. Me lias taken considerable interest in local public attairs, 
and for a period of sixteen years was justice of the peace of Sugar Creek- 
township, discharging tiie duties of the office in a manner that reflected much 
credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned, and 
his decisions were always characterized liy a soundness of judugment. fair- 
ness and faithfulness to dut\-. 



WILLIAM H. BUNDY. 

Endow-ed with a liberal share of good common sense and possessing 
sound judgment, backed by a well founded purpose to succeed, William 
H. Bundy, well known merchant at Bowers Station, and trustee of Sugar 
Creek township, Montgomery county, has labored with the object primarily 
in view of making a good home for himself and family and acquiring a com- 
petency for his declining years. This laudable desire is being realized, and 
he is in what we sometimes call "easy circumstances," with a sufficient sur- 
plus for the proverbial "rainy day," which sooner or later comes to e\eiy 
individual, and also, when not provided for, results in at least much incon- 
venience and unhappiness if not downright suffering. It is perhaps possible 
for everv able bodied young man to prepare against such a time, but some, 
instead of doing so, trust to luck, which is an elusive and capricious thing, 
and so, believing in the optimism of the future, they spend all on the pres- 
ent. Mr. Bundy, it seems, has been wiser and his prudence has urged him 
to pursue a different course, which, all contemplative minds will agree, is 
the wiser, and therefore his example and that of his worthy father before 
him as well, are to be commended to the younger readers of this work whose 
destinies are yet matters for the future to determine and who are hesitat- 
ing at the parting of the ways. 

Mr. Bundy was born on January 17, 1869, near Thorntown. Boone 
county, Indiana. He is a son of A. D. and Rosa A. (Tetrow) Bundy. 
The father was born on January 3, 1848. also in Boone county. He was 
married in Clinton county after which he nioxed to Montgomery county, 
and is now living at Smartsburg, Indiana. The mother of our suliject was 
born in Pennsylvania on No\enilier 2~, 1847. in Summerset county, and she 
removed to western Indiana with her parents when she was five years old. 
Her death occurred on No\-ember 5. 1885. 

William H. Bundv received a common school education and lie irrew 



9o<5 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to manhood on his father's farm, the elder Bund)- ha\'ing always engaged 
in general farming, but a few years ago he retired from active work on the 
farm and went into the merchandise business. Besides our subject he has 
one other child, George, who was born in 1871 and owns a grocery store 
in Crawfordsville. 

William H. Bundy came to Montgomery county in 1890. He was 
married in 1891, on March 15, to Laura A. Gordon, who was born in How- 
ard county, Indiana, in 1872. She is a daughter of W. R. and Hester 
(Coy) Gordon, a well known Howard county family. Mrs. Bundy re- 
ceived a common school education. 

Eight children have been born to our subject and wife, four of whom 
are still living, namely: Marie, born March 19, 1899: Gladys, born Octo- 
ber 23, 1903; Leoda and Leo, twins, born July 2, 1910. 

Upon moving to this county, Mr. Bundy took up the saw mill busi- 
ness and later entered the mercantile field at Bowers Station in 1899,' 
and here he has continued to the present time, enjoying an extensive trade 
with the surrounding country, his being the only store in this village. He 
was appointed postmaster here on June 11, 1907, and he is also railroad 
agent here for the Vandalia line. He owns his store, forty by fifty feet, 
also owns his home and a small farm near here, also a blacksmith shop, 
store buildings, three dwellings, a coal yard and a scale yard. He is one 
of the energetic and successful business men of the county. 

Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic Order at Colfax, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows at Darlington, the Improved Order of Red Men at 
Bowers Station, and he is a member of the Horse Thief Detective Associa- 
tion, and the United Brethren church. Politically, he is a Democrat. He 
was elected trustee of Sugar Creek township in 1908. He at one time had a 
half interest in the Bowers elevator, known then as Jordan & Bundy, but he 
sold out his interest in 191 1 to his partner. He also runs a huckster wagon 
on the road, and it is considered one of the best and most popular in the 
county. It makes all the eastern part of the county and parts of Tippe- 
canoe county. He is known to insist on his driver or buyer paying the high- 
est prices possible under the market for produce and dealing honestly and 
courteously with all his hundreds of regular customers. 

The following article appeared in the Cramfordsziille Reviczv under 
date of January 9, 1913, and is self explanatory, and we deem well worthy of 
reproduGtion here. It was under the caption "Bundy Makes Good Showing 
in Sugar Creek." 



MOXTGOMF.RV COLN'TV, INDIANA. 989 

"TriKstec W. H. lUiiuly, of Sugar Creek tnu iisliip, is llie first oi tlie 
township trustees to tile his annual report for i<;ij. Trustee Hundv coin- 
pleted four }-ears in otiiee January 8th and durin.t^- this time he has inatle an 
excellent record, his wise and judicious administration of the attairs of his 
office putting Sugar Creek township in the best financial condition. 

"Trustee Bundy was elected on the Democratic ticket and is the first of 
that party to hold the office in Sugar Creek in many years. Pessimistic pre- 
dictions were made regarding his ability, and he has shown the utter absurdity 
of these by making the best trustee the township has ever had. 

"When he went into office Trustee Bundy's predecessor turned over to 
him a balance of $4,^44.90. His report for 191 2 filed yesterday shows a 
balance in all funds of $12,072.79. Mr. Bundy has increased the balances 
in the various funds by approximately $7,828, in the four years he has held 
the office. The tax levy in Sugar Creek has not been increased during 
Trustee Bundy's term and the substantial showing made is due entirely to 
his able handling of the finances of the township. Below is given a sum- 
mary of Mr. Bundy's report for 1912: 

"Balance receipts — township fund, $2,000.31; road fund, $1,421.72; 
special school fund, $7,361.82; tuition fund, $8,266.35; dog fund, $179.27. 
Disbursements — township fund, $933.98; road fund, $734.48; special school 
fund, $2,832.42; tuition fund, $2,590.80; dog fund, $65. Balance, town- 
ship fund. $1,066.33: road fund, $689.24; special school fund. $4,529.40; 
tuition fund. $5,675.55; dog fund, $114.27." 



G. O. GODARD. 



Among the enterprising and successful business men of Darlington, 
Montgomery county, who have made a success of their life work and are 
deserving of the title "progressive" is G. O. Godard, a well known and popu- 
lar merchant, a man who has never depended upon others to do what he knew 
to be his own tasks, and he has always endeavored to carry into his business 
and social life the principles based on the old Golden Rule, consequently his 
large success in a material way has been deserving and he is worthy of the 
trust and confidence that has been reposed in him by all who know him. 

Mr. Godard was born in Mercer count}-. Illinois, on August 19. 1872. 
He is a son of Samuel and Mary (Dean) Godard. The father was born on 
July 3, 1S35, and his death occurred in March iS. 1901. The mother was 



990 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

born in 1847 and is still living, making her home in Arkansas. She received 
a good education and attended college; taught school sometime before her 
marriage. Samuel Godard spent his life successfully engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits, specializing on raising horses, principally Clydesdale horses, 
which, owing to their superior quality, found a very ready market. He was 
regarded as an exceptionally good judge of a horse. He was a quiet man, 
preferring to remain close to his farm and home, and took little interest in 
public matters. Politically, he was a Republican, and during the Civil war he 
sei'ved gallantly as a soldier for the Union, having enlisted in October, 1861, 
in Company G, One Hundred Twenty-fourth Illinois \'olunteer Infantry. 
He served three and one-half years, then was honiira1)Iy discharged on ac- 
count of bad health. 

Si.x children were born to Samuel Godard and wife, five of whom are 
still living, namely: Myrtle, G. O., of this sketch: Ray. Dana, Stella and 
Banner, the latter being deceased. 

G. O. Godard received a good common school education in his native 
community in Illinois and there he grew to manhood on the home farm, re- 
maining under the parental roof-tree until he was nineteen years of age when 
he went into the dr}' goods business. His start was humble, having been 
made in an old huckster wagon, he having gathered up produce around 
Francisville, Indiana, making that town his headquarters. He soon, how- 
ever, had a start, and, seeking a better field he came to Lafayette. Indiana. 
where he remained awhile engaged in the same line of endeavor. Subse- 
quently, he followed this line of endeavor in a number of other places, always 
with growing success, becoming one of the best known men in his line of 
business in this part of the state. In igoo he moved to Indianapolis and 
went into the dry goods business, being with se\'eral large dry goods mer- 
chants, including \Vm. Laurie Co. and W. H. Block, and for a short time he 
was in business for himself there. In 19 10 he moved to Darlington and 
entered the dry goods business under the firm name of Godard & Peters. 
Mr. Peters retired June' 10, 191 1 and Mr. Godard continued the business 
under the name of G. O., Godard. He has met with a large degree of success, 
enjoying an extensive and lucrative trade with the surrounding country. He 
carries a large and carefully selected stock of up-to-date goods at all seasons 
and his hundreds of customers always receive honest and courteous treat- 
ment. He has the largest stock of dry goods in this part of the county. 

Mr. Godard was married on Februarv 21, iSgS to Lena A'ickers. who 



MONTGOMERY COUNTV, INDIANA. i/Jl 

was 1)1 )rn in Kentucky on September 27, 1877, there grew to woinanliond and 
received her education. 

To our subject and wife has been born one child. Marian, whose birth 
occurred on January 17, np^. She is attending school. 

Politically, Mr. Godard votes independently. Religiously, he is a mem- 
ber of the Christian church. 



WILLI. \M S. I1.\^L 



Among the most enterprising citizens of Ripley township, Montgomery 
county, is \\'illiam S. Ham, of the village of Alamo, a man of known skill as 
a painter and of modern methods as an agriculturist. Thus he keeps very 
busy, for his fine farm claims a great deal of attention, and, being one of the 
most careful and skilled painters in this part of the county his services are in 
great demand. The reason he has the confidfience of the people of this 
locality- is because he has ever dealt honestly with them and has done his work 
well and conscientiously. 

Mr. Ham was born in Fountain county. Indiana, on August 7. 1S70. 
He is a son of Rhoden and Mandy J. (Willis) Ham. The father was born 
on January i"6, 1839. in Montgomery county. Indiana, and he sjjcnt his life 
in his native state, devoting his manhood years to agricultural pursuits. Mis 
death occurred in July, 1907. His wife, Mandy J. Willis, was born on Jul\- 
15, 1843. in Montgomery county, Indiana, and there she grew to womanhood 
and received her education in the old-time district schools. She is still living. 
making her home with her son, William S., of this review. 

To Rhoden Ham and wife were born four children, two of whom are 
still living, namely: Albert is deceased; William S., sul)ject of this sketch; 
Fred is deceased; Lewis is the youngest of the family. 

William S. Ham grew- to manhood on the home farm and there assisted 
with the general work when a boy. He received a common school education. 
He began life's serious w^ork as a farmer and this he has continued to follow 
with success. He also learned the painter's trade when a young man and 
this he has followed in connection with farming for many years, but general 
farming and stock raising has claimed the major portion of his attention. 
He owns a finely improved and well cultivated farm of one hundred and 
thirty acres in Ripley township, nearly all tillable, but about ten or twelve 
acres, and his fields are well tiled, fenced and free from rock. Mr. Ham 



992 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

maintains his residence in tiie town of Alamo, where lie is owner of a cozy 
home. He is also the owner of several valuable lots in Alamo. 

Mr. .Ham has remained unmarried. Politically, he is a Progressive and 
is much interested in the new movement for better government. In religious 
affairs he is a member of the Christian church, and, fraternally, he belongs 
to the Masonic lodge at Alamo. 



CALEB THAYER. 



The name of Caleb Thayer is too well known to the people of Madison 
township, Montgomery county, to need any formal introduction here, for 
his life has been spent practically in this locality where, for' a number of dec- 
ades he followed general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale. 
He is now living retired from active farming and is spending his declining 
years in quiet at his pleasant home in the attractive little village of Linden. 
He is the efficient and popular justice of the peace, and he is a man who has 
in every way deserved the large degree of success that the Fates have decreed 
for him, for he has not only worked hard but has lived uprightly and has been 
neighborly and charitable. He is one of our honored veterans of the L^nion 
army. 

Mr. Thayer was born on March 12, 1844,, in Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and when a child he moved with his parents to Indiana and here he 
has been content to spend the rest of his life. He is a son of Joseph and 
Margaret (Stoops) Thayer. The father was born in Pennsylvania. His 
death occurred in 1849. The mother was also born in Pennsylvania, and her 
death occurred soon after that of her husband, in 1850. They grew to 
maturity in their native state and there received limited educations, and they 
devoted their lives to general farming. Politically, Joseph Thayer was a 
Whig, but he was never an active public man. His family consisted of four 
children, two of whom are still living; they were, Joseph is deceased; Henry 
was the second in order of birth; Caleb, of this review; Nathan, the youngest, 
is deceased. 

Caleb Thayer grew to manhood on his father's farm, and he received his 
education in the common schools at Westley, this county. 

When the Civil war came on Mr. Thayer went forth amidst its dangers 
and hardships to do what he could toward suppressing the rebellion, having 
enlisted in the Fortieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Kirk- 



MONTCOMKUV COIXTV. INDIAXA. 993 

Patrick, in Conipanv G. in Aui^ust, 1861. at Sugar (lru\e, Tippecanoe county. 
He served in that conipan\- about two and one-half years. His first engage- 
ment was at Perryville, Kentucky. Later he fought in the great battle of 
Stone's River, near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, then in the two days' battle at 
Nashville, also at Corinth and Lookout Mountain. , Li the summer of 1864 
he enlisted in Company E, Seventy-second Mounted Infantnv, under Captain 
Mann, at Sugar Grove, Indiana. While in this regiment he participated in 
the sanguinary conflict at Franklin and a number of skirmishes, and he was 
within a milcof JefYerson Davis, the Confederate President, when he was cap- 
tured. Later on our subject was transferred to the Forty-fourth Indiana 
\'olunteer Infantry, but he never went to his regiment, and was honorably 
discharged in September, 1865. at Edgefield, Tennessee, after a \'ery faithful 
and gallant military career of which his family and descendants may well be 
proud. 

After the war Mr. Tha\-er returned to Sugar Grove, Tippecanoe county, 
where he had located before hostilities began, and there he soon had a good 
start as a general farmer and stock raiser and these lines he continued to give 
his attention to with gratifying results as the years advanced until 1909 at 
which time he, having accumulated a comfortable competency through his able 
management and close application on his fine farm in Tippecanoe county, 
removed to Linden, Montgomer}' county, selling his farm, and here he still 
resides. 

]\Ir. Thayer was married on December 10, 1874, to Eveline Miller, who 
was born in Tippecanoe county on February 23, 1855. She was a daughter 
of Alexander and Martha A. (Lane) Miller. The father was born in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, in 1835, and his death occurred on June 26, 1899. The 
mother of Mrs. Thayer was born in Butler county, Ohio, in 1833, and her 
death occurred on June 26, 1886. 

To Alexander INIiller and wife nine children were l>orn. four of whom are 
still living. 

Mrs. Eveline Thayer received a good common school education, notwith- 
standing the fact that she had to walk about four miles to and from school, 
yet she applied herself carefully to her text-books. 

Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Thayer, six of whom are still 
living, namely: Mattie AI.. born August 5. 1875. married Leroy Haynes, and 
they live in Tippecanoe county: Wilbert. born September 5. 1880, married 
Mary Hendricks and they li\-e in White count)': Dayton O., born November 
25, 1883 has remained single: George C.. born June 20, 1886; Otis L., born 
(63) 



994 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

May i6, 1889: Claude A., Ijorn [May 30, 1892: Frederick E., born December 
4, 1897; Everett H., born September 3, 1902, died March 27. 1910: the other 
two children died in infancy. 

Mr. Thayer is the owner of one of the most commodious homes in Lin- 
den. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic Order, and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, both at Romney. Religiously, he is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he has ever been a staunch Repub- 
lican, and he was appointed justice of the peace at Linden to fill an unexpired 
term, and this office he is still holding to the satisfaction of all concerned, his 
decisions being always fair and unbiased. 



JAMES A. PETERSON. 

One of the most conspicuous figures in the present-day history of Mont- 
gomery county, in the industrial world, is James A. Peterson, banker and 
business man of Darlington. Equally noted as a citizen whose useful career 
has conferred credit upon the community and whose marked abilities and 
progressive qualities have won for him much more than local repute, he holds 
today distinctive precedence as one of the most successful men that ever 
inaugurated and carried to successful termination large and important under- 
takings. Strong mental endowment, invincible courage and a determined 
will, coupled with an honesty of purpose that hesitates at no opposition, have 
so entered into his composition as to render him a dominant factor in the 
financial and business world and a leader of men in important enterprises. 
He is essentially a man of afifairs, sound of judgment and far-seeing in what 
he undertakes ; and every enterprise to which he has addressed himself has 
resulted in liberal financial returns, while at the same time he has won and 
retained the confidence and good will of all classes, and is eminently entitled 
to conspicuous mention in a volume of the province assigned to the one in 
hand. 

Mr. Peterson was born on January 10, 1872 in Montgomery county, 
Indiana. He is a son of John and Hannah (Dain) Peterson. The father 
was born in Ohio, July 25, 1829, from which state he came to Indiana when 
a small child with his parents and here he spent the rest of his life, dying on 
January 27, 1897. The mother of our subject was born in Indiana, and she 
is still living, making her home in Darlington. John Peterson devoted his 
life to general farming and stock raising. He was a quiet, home man. taking 



MONTGOMrRV CdrXTV. IXDIAXA. 993 

little part in public affairs, lie was a Repulilican, and fur a nuniher n\ years 
was county commissioner. His family consisted of five cliiUlren. 

James A. Peterson of this sketch grew to manhood on the ImuK' farni 
and there he assisted with the general work when a boy. He received his 
education in the local public and high schools, later attending a business col- 
lege in New Albany, Indiana. On June 8, 1892, he married Nora Hunt, who 
was born in Montgomery county. May 3. 1873, and she received a similar 
education to that of Mr. Peterson. 

Five children have been born to our subject and wife, four sons and one 
daughter, namely: Herbert W'., born Alarch 11, 1893, is attending the Chi- 
cago Technical University, taking the course in architecture; J. Harold, born 
December 10, 1896 is attending high school; Charles Husted, born April 19, 
1899; Henrv Hunt, born November 2^. 1905: and Mary Hannah, born July 
22, 190;. 

]Mr. Peterson made his start on the farm where he remained until he 
was about eighteen ^■ears of age. In 1891 he entered the first bank that was 
organized in Darlington as bookkeeper, known as the Peoples' Bank. There 
he remained until 1902, meanwhile mastering the various phases of the bank- 
ing business, and in March of the last named year the Farmers and Merchants 
Bank of Darlington was organized, being a private bank with a capital stock 
of fifteen thousand dollars. In November, 1906, this bank was made a state 
bank, retaining the old name, the new capital stock being twenty-five thousand 
dollars, and a surplus of six thousand dollars. Its development has been 
rapid, but substantial, and its popularity has grown with the years, until it is 
todav one of the most popular, safest and conservative institutions of its kind 
in the county and the largest tax paying bank in Franklin township. Its 
officers are: President, Albert Cox; Vice-President, William Hampton; 
Cashier, James A. Peterson ; Assistant Cashier, Joseph E. LaFollette. 

Mr. Peterson was one of the organizers of a private bank at Kirk- 
patrick, Indiana, March 2, 1909, under the name of The Bank of Kirkpat- 
rick. Officials: President, L. C. Grimes; Vice-President, M. .\. Dix; 
Cashier, Harry Wright. Mr. Peterson is a director of this bank, and he was 
president of the same until January i, 1913. Its large success and favorable 
prestige has been gained very largely through the able management and wise 
counsel of our subject. 

In 1894 Mr. Peterson was one of the organizers of the Building and 
Loan Association, becoming secretar}- of the same. It has Ix'en one of the 
most successful organizations of its kind in Montgomery county. In 1896 



996 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the Darlington Telephone Company of Darlington was organized, of which 
Mr. Peterson has been manager for the last fifteen years and he has built it 
up to one of the best equipped and most satisfactory systems in this part of 
the state. In 1895 Mr. Peterson was one of the organizers of the water 
works system of Darlington, known as the Darlington Water Works Com- 
pany, which installed the present splendid system in this thriving little city. 
This company has four good wells from which an abundance of the finest 
water is obtained. It also affords excellent fire protection for the city. Mr. 
Peterson is now manager of this company, which, like everything else with 
which he has been affiliated is a pronounced success. Thus we see that he is 
a very busy man and an important factor in the affairs of this section of 
Montgomery county. He is by nature an organizer and promoter, seldom 
making a mistake, and his promotions are always along safe and legitimate 
lines. 

Politically, he is a Republican, but has never been especially active in 
public life, preferring his happy modern home and his large business affairs. 
He is a member of the IMethodist Episcopal church, and is a trustee in the 
same. 



THEODORE HANKINS. 

Among the enterprising citizens of New Ross, Montgomery county, who 
have forged to the front through sheer persistency and the application of 
sound business principles is Theodore Hankins, one of the best known under- 
takers of Walnut and surrounding townships. He is a man who believes in 
assisting in furthering the general interests of his vicinity while laboring for 
his own advancement and, having dealt honorably with his' fellow men he 
has won their good will and respect. 

Mr. Hankins was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, March 8, 1858. He 
is a son of John L. and Orpha (Hancock) Hankins, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania and the latter of Kentucky. John L. Hankins came to Mont- 
gomery county on August 16, 1865, and settled in Ripley township, estab- 
lished a good home and there he and his wife spent the rest of the earthly 
days and reared their family of eight children, who were named as follows : 
Angeline, Sarah Jane, Caroline, Albert, Theodore (our subject), Alexander, 
Victoria and Ada Austin are both deceased. 

John L. Hankins became an influential man in his township and he 
filled the office of justice of the peace for a period of twenty-five years, his 



MONTGOMERV COUNTY. INDIANA. 997 

long retention in the sauK being sufticient evidence of his higli standing in 
the conimunit}- and of the universal trust reposed in him, of his sane and fair 
decisions and impartiality. He had also been a justice of the peace in Oliio 
before he came here, and was also a constalile in his native state. His death 
occurred on January g, 1899 at the age of eighty years. His widow sur- 
vived until 1905, dying at the age of seventy-three years. 

Theodore Hankins grew to nianliood on the lionie farm and tlicre he 
assisted with the genera! work when a hoy. He leceixed his education in 
the common schools of Montgomery county, then worked at the barber busi- 
ness for a period of twenty-five years, becoming one of the most skillful and 
popular tonsorial artists in this part of the county. During twelve years of 
that i>eriod he also did some business as an undertaker, and he farmed for six 
years. He spent three years in Pittsburg and \\'aynetown, and also spent 
some time in several other places. He started a barljer shop at New Ross, 
Walnut township, in 1888 and remained there until 1890. On September 
1st of that year, he turned his attention exclusively to the undertaking busi- 
ness in which he is still active, having thus l^een continuously engaged at the 
town of New Ross for nearly twenty-tlirec years. He is well equipped in 
every respect for insuring high grade and ])rom])t service and he understands 
every phase of the undertaking business. He has been very successful and 
has built up quite an extensive and satisfactory business. 

^Mr. Hankins was married on September 8, 1889, to Rose E. Morrison, 
who was Ixjrn on January 12, 1863. She is a daughter of Thomas E. and 
Nancy (Routh) Morrison, the father a native of Tennessee and the mother 
of Butler county, Ohio. They were early settlers in Montgomery county, 
Indiana, and here Mrs. Hankins was born, reared and educated in the com- 
mon schools. She is one of a family of six children, four sons and two 
daughters. 

Three children have been born to our subject and wife, namely : Harold, 
died December 25, 1891 ; Hazel, born October 14, 1893; Everitt, born Decem- 
ber 19, 1903 is at home. 

Fraternally, Mr. Hankins is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at New Ross. He is a Democrat and religiously belongs to the 
Christian Disciples church. 

The wife of Mr. Hankins passed away on May 15, 191 1, at the age of 
forty-eight years, three months and twenty-seven days. 

To Thomas E. Morrison and wife, mentioned above, the following chil- 
dren were born: Mar\' E., born August 3. 1845: John, born December 22, 



998 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

1847; Marion, born March 14, 1850: Jesse A., July 9, 1853; James E., July 
7, 1857; Rose E., who married Mr. Hankins, was born January 12, 1863. 

Nancy Routh, mentioned above, was born in Butler county, Ohio, April 
29, 1823. Thomas Morrison was bom on January 6, 1821. They were mar- 
ried on October 30, 1844. The death of Mr. Morrison occurred on August 
21, 1887; and that of his wife on January 6, 1910. Marion Morrison died 
on October 15, 1888. The ^lorrison children were all born in Montgomery 
county. 



SATilUEL R. PEACOCK, M. D. 

The life of the scholarly or professional man seldom exhibits an}' of 
those striking incidents that seize upon public feeling and attract attention to 
himself. His character is generally made up of the aggregate qualities and 
qualifications he may possess as these may be elicited b}- the exercise of the 
duties of his vocation or the particular profession to which he belongs. But 
when such a man has so impressed his individuality upon his fellow men, as 
to gain their confidence and through that confidence and his individual merit 
rises to an important place in the locality in which he resides his name is 
worthy of mention on the pages of history. Dr. Samuel K. Peacock, of 
Ladoga, is one of the men of Montgomery county, who, not content to hide 
his talents amid life's sequestered ways, has by the force of his will and a 
laudable ambition forged to the front in a responsible and exacting calling, 
and earned an honorable reputation in one of the most useful of professions. 
His life has been one of hard study and research from his youth and since 
maturity of laborious professional duty, and he is eminently deserving of the 
success he has achieved and the high esteem in which he is universally held. 

Dr. Peacock was born at Oakville, Ontario, Canada, June 15, 1867. He 
is a son of William G. and Isabella (Buchanan) Peacock. 

The father was of English ancestry, and was a son of William Peacock 
and wife, of Suffolk, England. The mother's parents were from the north 
of Ireland. 

Dr. Peacock grew to manhood in the Pro\-ince of Ontario and attended 
the schools in his native locality, graduating from the high school at Oakville. 
He entered the medical department of the University of Buffalo in the fall of 
1888 and was graduated from the same in 1892. He began practicing medi- 
cine in Chicago, where he remained until in January, 1894, when he located 
in Ladoga, Indiana, where he has ever since been engaged in the practice and 



M()\T('.(i.MKK\' c■ln■^•r^■. imh.wa. yyg 

where he has IniiU up a hirgc and hicrative patronage. His hrother. also a 
physician, came here later and is now practicing in Darlington, They Ixith 
belong to the county and state medical societies, and our suhject is a nienilier 
of the Masonic order, and politically he is a Democrat. 

Dr. Peacock was married on June 6, 1900 to Lois B. Walterhouse, of 
Indianapolis. She was a graduate nurse. Her father. Major Thomas 
Walterhouse, was a well know-n attorney in Muncie, Indiana. He served 
with distinction in the Union army during the Civil war, and for meritorious 
conduct was promoted through the various grades to that of major. He 
helped organize the Sixty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry in which he was 
successively second lieutenant and captain in Company B, and in August, 
1862 was commissioned major of his regiment. He was wounded at the 
battle of Richmond, but, by reason of superior officers being shot down, he 
took command. He was taken prisoner, but was paroled. He was again 
sent to the front and was in the service until 1863 when, after a brilliant 
career, he resigned on account of ill health and was honorably discharged. 
After the war he practiced law in Muncie the remainder of his life, and was 
regarded as one of the leaders uf the liar i>t that section of the state. He 
was born in 1832 in Genesee count}-. New York. In earh- life he was in turn 
a teacher, jeweler and watch maker. He and Zerelda B. Kemper were mar- 
ried in 1857. She was a sister of Dr. G. W. H. Kemper. He was a mem- 
ber of the Masonic Order, belonged to the Baptist church and was a Repub- 
lican. His wife was the youngest child of Arthur Smith Kemper and 
Patience Bryant Kemper. Her brother, the noted Dr. G. W. Kemper, widely 
known for his writing of the medical history of Indiana as well as for his 
eminence as a physician. The Kemper genealogy is, in part, as follows: 
Arthur Smith Kemper, son of John, son of Henry, son of John, born in 1692, 
son of John George, of Germany, son of Johann, also of Germany. Johann 
lived in Musen in Westphalia, Germany, in 1649. His son John (Jeorge was 
an elder in the Lutheran church there, and his sun John came to \'irginia 
as early as T714 and subsecjuently settled in Germantown. I'ennsylxania. His 
son Henry, moved to Kentucky. John, son of the latter, lived in ( iarrard 
county, Kentucky, where his death occurred in 1833. John, son of Arthur 
S.. married Patience Bryant, and they lived in Decatur county, Indiana. 
Patience Bryant was a daughter of John Bryant, of \^irginia. whose father, 
John, Jr., of \'irginia, was a son of James, Sr.. of England. James Br\ant. 
Sr., came to \'irginia about 1700. John Bryant was born in Cumberland 
county, \'irginia. in 1760, and although a mere hoy he served fifteen months 



lOOO MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

as a private soldier in the American arni)' during" tlie Revolutionar)' war, 
later becoming sergeant in the Virginia troops, and he participated in the bat- 
tle of Guilford court house and after the war he drew a pension. There is 
good ground for believing that his father was also a soldier in the War for 
Independence. 

To Dr. Samuel R. Peacock and wife three sons have been born, namely : 
A. Kemper, Albert Bryant, and Samuel Rogers. 

The Doctor has a nice home in Ladoga, which is built on the site of the 
old Baptist church, across the street from the present high school. He also 
has a brother in Chicago who is a physician. His father was a contractor 
and farmer. The motiier is a relative of President James Buchanan. Grand- 
mother Peacock was known in her maidenhood as Harriett Ashbey. Grand- 
mother Buchanan was Isabella Moore before her marriage. Grandfather 
Buchanan and wife came from County Armagh, Ireland, and was a distant 
cousin of President Buchanan, and were scholarly people. 

Personally, Dr. Peacock is a plain, unassuming, hard-working gentle- 
man, friendly in a quiet way and always a student. 



OTHEL L. OSBURN. 



Although }-oung in years Othel L. Osburn. of \\'ayne township, Mont- 
gomery county, well known contractor and at this writing trustee of his town- 
ship, has succeeded admirably at his life work and at the same time his record 
and reputation are first class for integrity and reliability in all matters 
entrusted to him. His success thus far has been achieved by improved oppor- 
tunities, by untiring diligence and by close study and correct judgment of men 
and motives. In every walk of life his career has been upright and honorable, 
and he is well Hked by all who know him ; but this is not to be wondered at, 
rather to be expected, when one learns that he is a representative of one of the 
best and most honorable old families of this county, the reputation of which 
he has ever sought to keep untarnished. 

Othel L. Osburn was born on February 29, 1872 in Wayne township, 
this county. He is a son of R. S. and Mary (Grenard) Osburn. The father 
was born on February 21, 1849, ^"<i the mother was born on February 19, 
1852. The father is still living, making his home in Rogersville, Missouri, 
where he is engaged in the newspaper business. The death of the mother 
occurred in 1877. 






ORTHEL L. OSBURN 



MOXTCOMKRV COUN'TV, INDIANA. lOOI 

The father of our subject became a well educated man, principallv 
through his own efforts. He laugiit school for some time in his earlier years, 
becoming a newspaper editor later in life, and was very successful in both 
lines of endeavor; he published a paper in the town of Rogersville and it be- 
came a very influential factor in that country. R. S. Osborn has also farmed 
some. His family consisted of but two children, namely: Othel L., of this 
sketch; and Bertha, who was born August 15. 1878, is living in .Montgomery 
county, Indiana. 

Othel L. Osburn received a good common school education, and attended 
high school in Waynetown. He began life by working on the farm which he 
followed until about six years ago when he turned his attention to bridge and 
road contracting in this county which he has continued to follow with pro- 
nounced success to the present time. He constructs his bridges for the most 
part of concrete, and his work is most satisfactory in every respect for it is 
both well and honestly done and he is kept busy all the time, being one of the 
best known contractors in his line in this part of the country. He has been 
very successful in a financial w ay and was the owner of a good farm which he 
operated on a large scale until the spring of 19 u when he sold it, and has 
since devoted his attention exclusively to contracting. 

Mr. Osburn has never married. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
Masonic Order and the Knights of Pythias, both at \\'aynetown. He is a 
member of the Baptist church, and politically votes the Democratic ticket. 
He has always taken much interest in the affairs of his party and is regarded 
as one of the local leaders in the same. He has filled most acceptably the 
offices of supen'isor, assessor and trustee, honestly and faithfully discharging 
the duties entrusted to him, for the past fourteen years.. At the present time 
Mr. Osburn is in charge of the construction of a consolidated school at Wayne- 
tow-n, which will be the largest building in the county outside of Crawfords- 
ville. 



LLFAXELI.YX GLEX COPPAGE. 

The name of Llewellyn Glen Coppage has been carried throughout the 
United States through his famous hats, the "Ben-Hur Brand," which he has 
long manufactured at Crawfordsville and for which there is a great demand, 
for in this, his specific line of endeavor, as in everything else, he has sought 
to do honest and conscientious work, having been trained in his youth to do 



1002 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

well whatever is worth doing at all, and this is one of the secrets of his large 
and ever growing success, which he deserves in every way. He is a booster 
for the city of Crawfordsville and has done much for its permanent de- 
velopment. 

Mr. Coppage was born on July 25, 1876 in Hillsboro, Indiana, and he is 
a son of Llewell}'n J. and Mary E. (Revercomb) Coppage. 

Mr. Coppage of this review, received a good common school education 
in and near Crawfordsville. When eleven years of age he joined a theatrical 
troupe with which he remained some time, during which period he picked up 
a musical education, and later had charge of the Coppage Orchestra, a well 
known organization in its day, which for several years played for all local 
social and public functions, also furnished the music in the old Nutt House 
dining room. He later had charge of an orchestra at what is now Mudlavia, 
then went to Michigan City, Indiana, and taught music for two years with 
much success. While there he purchased a dry cleaning and hat manufac- 
turing business. He later went to Danbury, Connecticut, where he learned 
thoroughly the hat manufacturing business. That city is the center of the 
hat manufacturing industry in America, at least one of the principal, and Mr. 
Coppage still goes there once a year for the purpose of keeping fully abreast 
of the times in his chosen field of endeavor, and he thus keeps up with mod- 
ern styles and methods of manufacture. He understands every phase of the 
manufacturing of hats and is recognized as one of the best in his line, and, 
because of the superior quality of his products there has long been a great 
demand for them. He established his present business in Crawfordsville in 
1906, his plant, which is well and modernly equipped, having a capacity of 
from twelve to fifteen dozen hats, the "Ben-Hur Brand," which has been 
very popular for the past six years all over the country. He has also been 
very successful in the cleaning business, and he purchased the Demas-Gilbert 
Block, in 1910, a splendid, substantial three-story building, with large floor 
space and with a commodious addition in the rear. 

Mr. Coppage is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and is Past Chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. He is now colonel 
of the Fourth Regiment of the Indiana Patriarchs Militant, is past chief 
patriarch of Bethesda Encampment, No. 15, is also past grand of Crawfords- 
ville Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is also a member of the 
Rebekahs, the Tribe of Ben-Hur, and he has the "Decoration of Chivalry," a 
high Odd Fellow distinction. He has long been very active and prominent 
in fraternal circles and is widely known throughout the state. He is a mem- 



MONTCOMERV COINTV, INDIANA. I OO3 

ber of tlie Stale and Xatitmal Dyers and Cleaners Association in whicli lie 
takes a great deal of interest. 

-Mr. Coppage was inarried on Sei)tenilier ^^^o. k^oj to r.e»ie Mina Ryan, 
a lady of culture and the representative of a line family of Aiichit^an City. 
Indiana. 



D.Wll) IIRKS llOSTETTER. 

The two most strongly marked characteristics of both the luist and the 
West are combined in the residents of Montgomery county. Indiana. The 
enthusiastic enterprise which overleaps all obstacles and makes possible almost 
any undertaking in the comparatively new and vigorous states of the .Middle 
West is here tempered by the stable and more careful policy that we have bor- 
rowed from our eastern neighbors, and the combination is one of jieculiar 
force and power. It has been the means n\ jilacing this section nf the country 
on a par with the older b'ast, at the same time producing a relial)ility and 
certainty in business affairs which is frequently lacking in the West. This 
happy combination of characteristics was possessed to a notable degree by the 
late David Hicks Hostetter, for many years one of the leading agriculturists 
and stock men of the vicinity of Ladoga. Equally noted as a citizen whose 
career conferred credit on the locality and whose marked abilities and sterling 
qualities won for him more than local repute, he held for a number of decades 
distinctive precedence as one of the most enterprising and progressive men 
of his section of the county. Strong mental powers, invincible courage and 
a determined purpose that hesitated at no opposition had so entered into his 
composition as to rentier him a dominant factor in local affairs. He was a 
man of sound judgment, keen discernment, far-seeing in what he under- 
took. His success in life was the legitimate fruitage of consecutive effort, 
directed and controlled by good judgment and correct principles. 

David H. Hostetter was a son of David and Mary (Hicks) Hostetter. 
He was born near Circleville, in Pickaway county, Ohio, September jj. iSj_>, 
and his death occurred on July i, 1910, when almost eighty-eight vears of age. 
He was the youngest of a family of seven children, namely: .Sherman. 
Beniah, Mrs. Mary Davidson, Mrs. Jane Hickathorn. .Mrs. Zerelda .Martin, 
and Mahala Hostetter who died in infancy. The mother of these children 
died when David H. was about two years old. and he liveil several years with 
his sister. Mrs. Hickathorn. His father married again and together the 
family came to Indiana, when our subject was nine years old. Two children 



I004 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

were born to the second nnion, Lewis who died when nineteen years old ; and 
Lucky W., who died about 1897 ^^ Wellsville, Kansas. There were three 
step-sisters, Mrs. Margaret Ashby, Mrs. Catherine Hedges, Mrs. EHzabeth 
Carlyle, and one step-brother, John Boyer. Our subject was reared with 
these children and the strongest ties of afifection always existed between them. 
The family made the journey to Indiana in wagons. Some idea of the bad 
conditions of the roads may be gained from the fact that it required a week 
to travel from Indianajwlis to Montgomery county, a distance of forty miles. 
The country was then practically a wilderness and sparsely settled. The ob- 
stacles encountered during that journey can hardly be imagined by those who 
now make the trip in two hours. The town of Ladoga was laid out five years 
after the family located here. The site at that time was a partly cleared 
farm. From the date of his arrival here David H. Hostetter spent the rest 
of his life within a mile and a half of the farm where his father first settled, 
until he moved into Ladoga about 1907. The family first located in the 
south half of Section 22, Scott township, which land the father had entered 
from the government, and there was only a small piece of ground cleared 
about the little cabin he had built. Here our subject grew to manhood and 
assisted with the hard work of clearing and developing the farm, and he 
received such education as the early day schools afforded. 

On November 15, 1874, David H. Hostetter was married to Amanda J. 
Graybill, daughter of Samuel and I^ydia (Arnold) Graybill. She was born 
and reared in Scott township in which her parents settled in 1836. Her 
father was born in Pennsylvania and was a son of Solomon and Maiy (Cline) 
Graybill. He went to Roanoke, Virginia, where he and Lydia Arnold were 
married. She was a daughter of Daniel Arnold and wife. The Graybill 
family settled in the wilderness and cleared their land and lived among the 
other pioneers. The children born to David H. Hostetter and wife were 

three in number, namely: Lydia, Samuel Sherman and Emma Jane. 

Mr. Hostetter fjecame the owner of over three hundred acres of valuable 
and productive land and was a prosperous farmer. He did not purchase his 
success at the cost of the higher things of life, for he was a man of exemplary 
habits and fine character, and he was admired and esteemed by all who knew 
him. He believed thoroughly in the justice and wisdom of God and that true 
happiness came through obedience to divine principles. He obeyed the com- 
mand "Love thy neighbor as thyself." This, and his great honesty, clean 
habits and solicitude for his loved ones and faith in his Saviour was his re- 
ligion. His honestv, industry and temperate habits were rewarded by a long 



M().\ rciOMEKV COLNTV, TN'DIAXA. 1 OO5 

life and all the comforts of old aj^e. His life has left many precinus mem- 
ories to his family and his many friends and those who in distress siiii,t,du the 
aid and advice, which to the worthy, was never denied. 

Mr. Hostetter was a member of the Independent Order of Odd I'cllows. 
He had two brothers in the Indiana legislature, Sherman and I'.eniah. also 
one. Lucky, who became a member of the Kansas legislature. 

Of the children of our subject, Emma Jane is the wife of Dr. 11. K. 
W'alterhouse, and they live at Oakville, Delaware count)-, this state, and are 
the parents of one son, David Kemper W'alterhwusc ; Samuel Sherman Hos- 
tetter lives in Ladoga, married Lola Ronk, and he is farming the old home 
place in Scott township ; Lydia makes her home in Ladoga with her mother. 

David H. Hostetter took an active part in the development of this sec- 
tion of the state and he was an interested spectator of the transformation 
from the wild woods to the highly impro\ed farms of a later day. He often 
related how he;and other pioneers dro\e their livestock to Lafayette, in Tippe- 
canoe count}-, where they sold them and with the money purchased groceries 
and other household supplies which they brought back on the return trip. 



JACOB FRANK \\'ARFEL. 

An honored and representative citizen of Montgoniery county is Jacob 
Frank W'arfel, for many years one of our best known and most successful 
educators, at present editor and publisher of the Ladoga Leader. He has 
been distinctively the architect of his own fortunes, has been true and loyal 
in all the relations of life and stands as a type of that sterling manhood which 
ever commands respect. He is a man who would have, no doubt, won his 
way in any locality where fate might have placed him, for he has sound judg- 
ment, coupled with great energy and honest tact, together with education 
and upright principles, all of which make for success wherever and whenexer 
they are rightly applied and persistently followed. By reason of these prin- 
ciples he has won and retained a host of friends in whatever c< immunity he 
is known. 

Air. Warfel was bom in Marion county. Indiana, on May 3, 1857. He 
is a son of Martin B. and Indiana (McClelland) W'arfel, and is of Pennsyl- 
vania Dutch ancestry on the paternal side. Martin B. \\'arfel died w hen our 
subject was ten years old. and the lad was compelled to hustle for himself. 
He soon began to work out at fanning, at first fur his bnard and clnthes and 



1006 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

later for wages. Continuing thus until he was nineteen years of age he 
then came to Ladoga in 1876, and there attended the Normal school for two 
years, then became a teacher in the same, in a few branches, although he con- 
tinued as a teacher, and was later given larger duties, remaining there as a 
teacher continuously many years, giving eminent satisfaction in every respect 
and finally became president of the school. Leaving the Normal he went to 
Indianapolis where he taught a year in the Hadley & Roterts Academy, then 
went to Frankfort, Indiana, and became principal of the high school while 
Prof. R. G. Boone, a noted educator, was superintendent of the schools there. 
A year later he returned to Ladoga and became superintendent of schools, 
which position he continued to hold in a manner that reflected much credit 
upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of the board and pupils, for a 
period of twenty-three years, his long retention being sufficient evidence of 
his popularity. During that period he taught, during the latter years, the 
children of some of his former pupils, finally resigning as superintendent in 
1908. His great force of character and ripe scholarship, together with hjs 
ability as an organizer enabled him to bring to his work in Ladoga the results 
of his professional experience with marked effect, and it was not long until 
the schools under his supervision advanced to the high standing of efficiency 
for which they are now noted. Many things tending to lessen the teachers' 
labors and at the same time make them effective were introduced ; the course 
of study throughout modified and improved, the latest and most approved 
appliances purchased and everything in keeping with modern educational 
progress, tested and where practical retained. Continuous application through 
a period of more than a quarter of a century gave him a clear and compre- 
hensive insight into the philosophy of education and the largest wisdom as 
to methods of attainment of ends, while his steady growth in public favor 
wherever he has labored and his popularity with teachers and pupils have won 
for him educational standing that is state wide and eminently deserving. 

■ On December i, 1890, Mr. Warfel bought the Ladoga Leader, which 
he had managed for a period of eighteen years during the period that he was 
connected with the schools here, and since resigning from the schools has 
devoted his entire attention to this popular and rapidly growing paper, which 
equals any of its type in this part of the country. It is all that could be de- 
sired from a mechanical standpoint, has become a valuable advertising 
medium and prints the latest and best news of the day and its editorials carry 
weight in promoting the general affairs of the community which it serves. 
For a period of eleven years while engaged in school work, Mr. Warfel 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. I OO/ 

was instructor in teachers' institutes in Indiana, in which he was rei^arded 
as a most potent factor, heing thus engaged during the summers, instructing 
the teachers in forty-two counties. He received a life teacher's certificate 
in 1884. which reheved him from all necessity of subsequent examination. 
No one in the state is more deserving of such honor. 

Fraternally, Mr. Warfel belongs to the Masonic order, and has been 
master of the Ladoga lodge. He is a member of the Knights Templars at 
Crawfordsville of which he was Eminent Commander. He is also active 
in the Knights of Pythias in which be has instituted two lodges and, as pre- 
siding officer, has taken one hundred and sixty-two men through the three 
ranks to full membership. He is widely known and influential in fraternal 
circles. 

Mr. Warfel was married in 1882 to Lizzie Huntington, of Ladoga, a 
lady of talent, education and refinement, a daughter of Hiram S. Hunting- 
ton and wife, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in these pages. 

Five children have graced the union of our subject and wife, namely: 
George, an electric engineer on the Union Pacific Railroad at Kearney, 
Nebraska, is married and has two children, Louise and Minnie; Herbert is 
in the engineer's office of the Central Union Telephone Company at Colum- 
bus, Ohio : Nellie is at home with her parents in Ladoga : Louise and Charley 
died in childhood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Warfel are both members of the Presbyterian church. 
He has retained his vitality and intellectual vigor to a remarkable degree. 
He is a most genial and pleasing gentleman personally. 



ROBERT F. HICKS. 



Farming seems to be what some would call "second nature" with 
Robert F. Hicks, of Clark township. Montgomery county, and while he 
doubtless could have succeeded in other lines of human endeavor, he is 
doubtless making a greater success as a tiller of the soil than he would in 
any other line, for he not only likes it but de\otes his e\ery care and atten- 
tion to it. 

Mr. Hicks was born on January 8, 1871, in Clark township, this county. 
He is a son of Preston and Martha Ann (Utterback) Hicks. He grew to 
manhood on the home farm, assisting with the general work there, and in 
the winter months he attended the neighboring schools. 



I008 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

On August 2T,. 1894, Mr. Hicks married Ella Hulett, daughter of 
Nathan Hulett and wife, a complete sketch of whom appears elsewhere. 
After his marriage Mr. Hicks went to farming for himself on the place he 
now owns in Section 35, Clark township, and here he has continued to re- 
side, his finely improved and productive farm hei'e consisting of one hundred 
and sixty acres, also owns forty acres not far south of his home place, two 
hundred acres in all. His land is under a fine state of improvement and cul- 
tivation, and he follows general farming, raising considerable live stock, 
buys and feeds cattle and is quite successful as an agriculturist and stock man. 
He has made many of the important improvements on his land himself. He 
remodeled both the house and barn, also built a large barn and in addition a 
cow barn, and he now has one of the choice farms of the township. 

Mr. Hicks is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and he and his wife 
belong to the Christian church. They ha\-e one daughter, Lena Hicks, whose 
twin sister died in infancy. Lena is now in her third year in high school at 
North Salem. 



IRA COX. 



It is indeed a rare pleasure and privilege to be able to spend our old age 
in the house where we spent our childhood. There is, as all will agree, a cer- 
tain "atmosphere" pen-ading the old home which is very noticeably absent 
from any place else, no matter how much finer and costlier may be our resi- 
dence in later life, and no matter how very humble may have been the home 
in which we first opened our eyes to the light of day. Ira Cox, one of the 
well known farmers, now retired, of Franklin township, Montgomery county, 
is one of the fortunate ones in this respect. .He has lived to see wonderful 
changes in this locality since he first sent his infant crj^ out on the air in this 
old homestead nearly seventy-three years ago, and he has not by any means, 
been an idle spectator to these changes with advancing civilization, but has 
been a very potent factor in them, having always stood ready to put his 
shoulder to the wheel of local progress. He has led a life for which no one 
can upbraid him now that it is drawing toward the silent twilight. 

Mr. Cox was born on October i, 1840 in this township and count}', as 
above stated. He is a son of William and Hannah (Pickett) Cox. The 
father was born on July 23, 1814 in Richmond, Indiana, and he moved to 
Montgomerv' county when a boy, when this section was a wilderness and in- 
habitants were few, and here he devoted his life successfully to general farm- 



ing. and readied an adxanced age, passing away on June _H), I(jO_^. Tlie 
mother of Ira Cox was horn on September 18. 1813 in Xortli Carolina and 
when a young girl she moved with her parents to Montgomery counl\ . Indi- 
ana, and here spent the rest of her Hfe dying on September 10, 1893. 

To these parents six children were born, three of whom are still living, 
namely: Catherine, Jeremiah are both deceased; Ira, of this sketch; Emily, 
Elwood is deceased: and Albert, the youngest. 

Ira Cox grew up on the home farm and there did his full share of the 
work when a boy, and he received his education in the local district schools. 
He has remained unmarried, and has always farmed on the home place, keep- 
ing it well improved and so skilfully cultivated that it has retained its original 
fertility. 

Mr. Cox is owner of three liundretl ruid twenty acres, two hundred and 
sixty of which is tillable, fairly well ditched and otherwise in good condition. 
He raises a good grade of live stock. 

Politically, Mr. Cox is a Republican, but he has never sought office, de- 
siring to lead a quiet home life, like his honest, hard-working father before 
him. He is a member of the Friends church and a trustee in the same. 



BENJAMIN F. CARMAN. 

The most elaborate history is perforce a merciless aliridgmenl. ibe 
historian being obliged to select his facts and materials from manifolil de- 
tails and to marshall them in concise and logical order. This applies to spe- 
cific as well as generic history, and in the former category is included the 
interesting and important department of biograph\ . In e\ery life of honor 
and usefulness there is no dearth of interesting situations and incidents, and 
yet in summing up such a career as that of .Mr. L'arman the writer nnisl needs 
touch only on the more salient facts, giving the keynote of the character ;ind 
eliminating all that is superfluous to the continuit)- of the narrative. The 
gentleman whose name appears above has led an active and useful life, not 
entirely void of the exciting, but the more prominent facts have l)een so 
identified with the useful and practical thai it i^ to them almost entirely that 
the writer refers in the following paragraphs. 

Benjamin F. Camian. who for many years has been recognized as one 
of the most substantial citizens of Montgomery countv, was born in Clark 
(64) 



lOIO MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

township, tliis county, on the 8th of August, i860. He conies of a long Hue 
of sterling ancestry, his family, on the paternal side, having been established 
in this country for over two hundred and fifty years, while in England the 
family line is traced back through several centuries. The first representative 
of the family in America were John and Florence Carman, who left Naz- 
ing, England, with a party of pilgrims, including John Eliot and the wife of 
Governor Winthrop, landing at Roxbury, Massachusetts, on November 2, 
163 1. The descendants of John and Florence Carman are scattered all over 
the United States, members of the family being also found in Canada, 
Mexico and South America. 

The first official record of the Carman family shows that at the time of 
the Norman conquest, in 1066, they owned eighty-two acres of land in 
Wiltshire, England, also a mill, a tenant and three slaves. Another refer- 
ence to the family is, about 1400, of a priest wlio ministered at the W'in- 
farthing church for thirty-eight years. From 1408 to 1470 William and 
Catherine Carman owned the manor of Patesley, in Norfolk. During the 
reign of "Bloody Mary" at least five members of the Carman family met 
death, being burned at the stake, martyrs because of their religious belief, 
and the record says they met their fate bravely, even joyfully. 

From such stock came John Carman, the pregenitor of the family in 
America. He has prospered here in liis worldly affairs, becoming quite well- 
to-do, and was prominent in public affairs in Connectitcut and Long Island, 
being a deputy to the general court of the colony in 1634. Two hundred 
and fifty years after he landed at Roxbury, five hundred of his descendants 
met at Hampstead. Long Island, to celebrate the arrival of the family in 
America. 

Among the children of John Carman was Caleb, who was the fatiier of 
James, who was the first pastor of the Baptist church at HighstOwn, New 
Jersey, in 1745. Rev. James had a son Caleb, who was the father of Joseph. 
The latter was born in 1745 at Bordentown, New Jersey, moved to the in- 
terior of Virginia, and in 1768 he married Mary LaRue, a French girl. Jos- 
eph Carman was a soldier in the American Revolution, having enlisted in 
1776 as a private in Captain William Croghan's company, Eighth A^irginia 
Regiment, commanded by Col. Abraham Bowman, to ser\'e until April, 
1778. In 1779 he and his family, in company with followers of George 
Rogers Clark, came down the Ohio river on flat boats, and located at a fort 
in Shelby county, Kentucky. Joseph Carman was killed by Indians along 
Carman's creek, in Henry county, Kentucky, in 1786. He was the father 



MONTCOMKKV COIXTV, INDIANA. lOII 

of seven children, of whom tlie second in order of birth was Isaac. Isaac 
Carman married Mary Hughes, who died of cholera in 1833. lie was a 
Baptist preacher in Shelby county for many years, and was well known and 
highly respected. His death occurred in Indiana in 1854. To him and his 
wife were born ten children, the youngest of whom was William N. Carman, 
father of the immediate subject of this sketch. 

William N. Carman was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, but in 1S34, 
when he was but seven years old, his father brought his family to Montgom- 
ery county, Indiana, where he entered three eighty-acre tracts of land, one 
for each of his three daughters, and also bought one hundred and sixty acres 
of land from Joseph Staten, who had entered it from the government in 
183 1. This land has remained continuously in the family, being now the 
property of the subject. Here William X. Carman was reared tn maturity 
and eventually married Ann 1-". Harrison. She was born in Clark township. 
this county, on October i. 1832, and was the daughter of John and Mary 
(Ashby) Harrison. Her parents \vere nati\es of Kentucky, who located in 
Harrison county, Indiana, where John Harrison served as judge of the 
county court. His wife was the daugliter of Lettice Ashby, whose family 
came to Montgomery county in an early day, or at about the same time as 
the Harrisons. Here John Harrison carried on farming pursuits the rest of 
his life. He also had two brothers, Eli and Joshua, who came to this county. 

William N. Carman lived on the old homestead in Clark township until 
the mother's death in 1899, after which he made his home with his son, 
Benjamin F., until his death, which occurred in August, 1010. They were 
the parents of seven children, of whom two s(jns died in infancy, two 
daughters, ?vlary E. and Martha, died in childhood, while those living are: 
Priscilla A., the wife of John V. Zimmerman, of Ladoga; Sallie F., the 
wife of Joseph Albert Smith, of Jamestown, and Benjamin F. ,of Ladoga. 
William N. Carman always followed the vocation of farming, in which he 
was successful, being energetic and practical in his efforts. Religiously, he 
was one of the charter members of Bethel Christian church, of which he w as 
elected elder and to which he donated an acre of ground on which to build 
the church. He owned altogether about four hundred acres of land, which, 
before his death, he divided among his childrtn. 

Benjamin F. Carman was reared on the home farm, where he remained 
until he was twenty-five years old, securing a good practical education the 
meanwhile in the public schools. After his marriage, in 1884, he farmed 
with his father for about a vear, at the end of which time he moved to a 



Jfjl2 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

place about a half mile north of the home place, where during the following 
seventeen years he devoted himself steadily to agriculture, and with gratify- 
ing results. He was elected to the office of auditor of Montgomery county, 
to take office in 1904, but, the office becoming vacant before his elective term 
begun, he was appointed to the office in the fall of 1903, thus holding the 
office for four years and two months. About a year before the expiration- 
of his official term, Mr. Carman, on December 3, 1906, bought the Knox 
hardware store at Ladoga, and thereupon moved his family from Crawfords- 
ville to that place. He was now an extremely busy man, having the official 
duties as auditor, the management of a hardware store and the supervision 
of a large farm on his hands, but he successfully took care of all his inter- 
ests, discharging his public duties to the entire satisfaction of his fellow citi- 
zens. About three years after acquiring the store he took his son, Walter, 
in as a partner, and on June i, 1910, he sold his remaining interest in the 
business to Ralph F. Blatchley. Then giving his entire attention to agricul- 
ture, he bought the interests of the other heirs in his father's farm, thus be- 
coming the owner of t\\ o hundred and eighty-five acres of splendid land in 
Clark township. About 1909 Mr. Carman bought the George Grimes resi- 
dence in Ladoga, a comfortable and attractive home, where he now resides. 

On September 11, 1884, Benjamin F. Carman was united in marriage 
with Lelia B. White, who was born and reared in Clark township, being the 
daughter of James L. and Harriett (Cox) White, the father having come to 
this state from Ohio in an early day. To Mr. and Mrs. Carman have been 
born four children, the two first of whom, born on August 28, 1885, were 
twins, George Waller and John Walter. The first named died on April 26, 
1888. The other two children are Anna L. and Bertha Irene. The latter 
is at home with her parents, while Anna L. is the wife of Guy Britton, of 
Roachdale. 

Walter Carman li\ed with his parents on the home farm until he was 
eighteen years old, and secured a good public school education, attending 
the high schools at Ladoga and Crawfordsville. He then attended business 
college, graduating in both bookkeeping and stenography, after which, for a 
}ear, he was employed as a clerk in the Crawfordsville State Bank. He has 
been in the hardware business since January i, 1907. One June 21, 191 1, 
he was married to Hazel B. Shackelford, the daughter of Mark Shackelford, 
of Ladoga. 

Politically, Benjamin F. Carman has always given his support to the 
Republican party and has ever taken a lively interest in the trend of public 



MOXTUO.MKUV COrXTV. INDIANA. IOI3 

affairs. His reli.s-ious iiicniliersliip is with the Chrisiian churcli, of uhich 
he is an elder and to which he gives a hheral suppurl. 1-ralernally. he be- 
longs to the Free and Accepted Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Tribe of Bcn-Hur, in all of which he takes an active interest. 
In every avenue of life's activities in which he has engaged, ^Ir. Carman 
has l)een true to every trust, and throughout the county he is held in the 
highest esteem. Persistent industry and ihc exercise of the ordinary (|ualUy 
of common sense — these have been the keynotes to the success which li.as 
crowned his efforts. Though devoting himself closely to his own business 
affairs, he has not been unmindful of his higher duties as a citizen and be 
has given his umiualihed su))port to every movement which has promised to 
benefit the community, morally, educationally, socially or materially. I'er- 
sonally, he is a man of pleasing address and his friends in Montgomery 
countv are in number at his acquaintances. 



DR. JOHN G. HEIGHWAY. 

Not so very long ago there was but two or three veterinary surgeons in 
Montgomery county. It was the rule, when anything got wrong with a 
horse or cow to administer a little home treatment, of simple remedies, an<l 
left to their fate; and if they died it was all right. Usually, the veterinary 
was so far away that the farmer believed his stock would be dead before the 
desired assistance could reach it. Then too, there were no telephones and 
the long ride on uncertainty was not looked on with favor, neither was the 
expense of the veterinary's services. But conditions have changed, and today 
we find a large number of skilled veterinaries over the count)-, and there 
seems to be plenty for all to do. Their services are required just the same 
as those of the family doctor. One of this iiuml)er who is deserving of 
special attention here is Dr. John G. Heighway. located at Ladoga, who has 
the distinction of being president of the Indiana \'eterinary Medical Associa- 
tion, which fact alone is criterion enough of his ability in his chosen field 
and the trust that is reposed in him by his colleagues. 

Dr. Heighway was born in London. Province of Ontario. Canada, 
September 2. 1864. He is a son of Thomas and Julia (Hamilton) Heigh- 
way. both of whom were natives of London, England, where they spent their 
earlier years and from which city they emigrated in an early day to Canada, 
locating the family home at London, Ontario, and there our subject grew to 



IOI4 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

manhood and received his educational training- in the high school. Subse- 
quently, he took the regular course in the Ontario Veterinary College at 
Toronto, where he made an excellent record and from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1888. Soon afterward he came to Ladoga, Indiana, and here began 
the practice of his profession, having been drawn here by the fact of there 
being so many fine horses here and no veterinary for many miles around. 
Here he has remained and has all the practice he can well take care of. His 
fame has spread over the state and he has many calls from Lafayette, Terre 
Haute, Indianapolis and even as far away as New Albany. No one in his 
line in the state has had better success than he. Remaining a close student 
he has kept well abreast of the times in his particular field of endeavor, and 
his office in Ladoga is equipped with every appliance known to modern and 
approved science in taking proper care of the ailments of the horse and other 
animals. 

Dr. Heighway was vice-president of the Indiana \^eterinary Medical 
Association, and in January, 1913, was elected president of the same, which 
position he is giving his loyal attention to, discharging its imix)rtant duties 
in a manner that is reflecting much credit upon himself and to the satisfaction 
of all concerned. He is doing much to increase interest in the same and to 
make it helpful to all concerned. He is also an influential member of the 
American Veterinary Association. 

Fraternally, the Doctor lielongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Masonic Order. 

Dr. Heighway was married to Lottie Fullen in 1895. She was born in 
Ladoga, Indiana, and is a daughter of Oliver and Susannah (Harney) 
Fullen, the father having been born near Jamestown, in Boone county, Indi- 
ana, and was a son of Charles and Sarah Fullen. He was a farmer and 
stock raiser, and for nearly a quarter of a century was in business in Ladoga, 
conducting with much success a general store here. He was a prominent 
member of the Masonic Order. He went to Cincinnati, Ohio, for the pur- 
pose of taking the Knights Templar degree. His death occurred in March, 
1871, when forty-six years old. Susan L. Harney, his wife, was born near 
Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, in 1855 and she came to Montgomery county with 
her parents when young. She was a daughter of Gilbert T. Harney, a man 
of more than ordinary intellectual power, with a fine physical constitution, 
and a pioneer preacher of great influence in Clark township. 

To Oliver Fullen and wife four children were born, namely: Charles 
H., James A., Charlotte (or Lottie), wife of Dr. Heighway: and Sarah, 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. I O I -, 

who married Charles Grantham, the well known veterinary surL;eon of Craw- 
fordsville. The mother of these children died at Ladoga in ujoj. 

To Dr. Heighway and wife four children were born, namely: Cieurge 
Fullen, Jean Harney, Herman Oliver, and Julia Esther. 

The doctor is a man of line physique and a good nii.xcr in his personal 
relations with his fellow men, being jovial and honest. Our subject is one 
of a family of ten children, all of whom are alive, healthy and prospering. 
They are named as follows : Thomas William, Richard Brooks, Alfred Wil- 
son, John G., Edmund Waldron, Sarah Jane, Julia, Marion, Gavin Hamilton 
and Arthur H. 



TOHX B. HOPPE\G. 



John B. Hopping is one of the later generation of farmers and stock 
raisers of Montgomery county, native and to the manor born, who form an 
important element in the maintenance of the prosperity of the county and are 
helping greatly to extend its wealth. He is a son of an early pioneer of this 
part of Indiana who played an important part in developing the agricultural 
resources of this famous Wabash region. He is a man who keeps himself 
thoroughly posted upon leading events, political, religious, business and scien- 
tific, and is a man of decided views, adhering to his convictions with the 
natural strength of his character. 

Mr. Hopping was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, on Octol^er 26, 
1874, and he is a son of Joseph and Mary J. (Berkshire) Hopping. The 
father was a native of New York state and the mother was born in Kentucky. 
Joseph Hopping was a farmer and he came to Montgomery county in 1837 
when the country was practically a wilderness and only a small portion of the 
land had been put under cultivation. He worked at common lalx)r here until 
1849 when he joined the large train of gold-seekers across the western plains 
to California, and he remained on the Pacific coast until 1852 when he re- 
turned to Indiana and purchased a farm of one hundred and thirty acres in 
Ripley township, JMontgomery county, which place is now owned and oper- 
ated by the subject of this sketch. Here he carried on general farming and 
stock raising the rest of his life, becoming one of the w ell known farmers of 
the western part of the county, and he was highly respected by his neighbors 
and acquaintances. Here he spent the rest of his life, reaching the advanced 
age of eighty-one years, dying in 1901. His wife preceded him to the grave 
in 1899 at the age of sixty-two years. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren, namely: Benjamin, John B. (our subject), and Bettie F. 



IOl6 MONTGOMERV COU.XTV, INDIANA. 

Our subject received his education in tlie common scliools of his native 
locality and he grew to manhood on the home farm. He began life for iiini- 
self by teaching school which he followed for a period of eleven years, meet- 
ing with pronounced success, his serxices being in great demand, for he 
pleased both patron and pupil, being not only an instructor but an enter- 
tainer in the school room. Finally, tiring of this vocation, he took up farm- 
ing on the old homestead which he has operated to the present time, keeping 
the place well improved and well cultivated so that it has retained its original 
fertility, and he has met with much success as a general farmer and stock 
raiser. 

Mr. Hopping has remained unmarried. He is active and influential in 
fraternal afifairs, being a member of the Free anil Accepted Masons at .Mamo, 
the Knights of Pythias at Waynetow n ; and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Alamo. He is trustee of Ripley townshij). haxing assumed the 
duties of this office on January i. 1909. His term will expire in 1915. 



LE^"ERITT ^^^ olin. m. d. 

The men most influential in promoting the advancement of society and in 
giving character to the times in which they live are two classes — the men of 
study and the men of action. Whether we are more indebted for the improve- 
ment of the age to the one class or the other is a question of honest difference 
of opinion; neither can be spared and both should be encouraged to occupy 
their several spheres of labor and influence zealously and without mutual dis- 
trust. In the following paragraphs are briefly outlined the leading facts and 
characteristics in the career of a gentleman who combines in his makeup the 
elements of the scholar and the energy of the public-spirited man of affairs. 
Devoted to the noble and humane work of eradicating mortal ills. Dr. 
Leveritt W. Olin, the well known and popular physician of Elendale, ]\Iont- 
gomery county has made his influence felt in a most potent manner in the 
locality of which this history treats. He is evidently endowed by nature with 
those qualities of heart and mind so necessary to the success of one who 
chooses for his life work a profession in which human sympathy must be dis- 
pensed with a liberal spirit as well as the ability to relieve human suffering. 

Dr. Olin was born in Portage county, Ohio, February 12. 1851. He is 
a son of Ransom and Clara (Clark) Olin. They were both natives of the 
same countv and state in which our subject was born; there thev grew to ma- 




L. \V. OLIN, M. D. 



MOXTC.OMKRV CorXTV, INDIANA. IOI7 

turity, were educated and nian-ied, and there they s\K'ui their hves. the father 
dying in 1868 and the mother in 1883. They devoted their Hves to farniinj;, 
and were known as honest, hospitable and hard working peojile. 'i'lie\- he- 
came the parents of eleven children, six of whom are still living. 

Dr. Leveritt W. Olin was reared in his native county in the Ikickeye 
state and there he received a good common school education, and early in life 
determined upon a medical career, and with that end in view he entered Buch- 
tel College, at Akron, Ohio. He began reading medicine under Dr. E. W. 
Price, of Kent, Ohio, under whom he studied four years, then entered the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, which was the medical 
department of Columbia University. There he spent two terms of six months 
each, making a splendid record for scholarship. After his graduation on 
March 12, 1880 he came to Ellendale, IMontgomery coimty, Indiana, and here 
he has been actively engaged in the practice since April 13th of that year, hav- 
ing built up an extensive and lucrative practice which extends over a wide 
territory and he has met with exceptional success and has taken a \ery high 
rank among his professional brethren in this section of the state. He has 
ever remained a student of all phases of his profession, keeping fully abreast 
of the times. 

The Doctor was married on September 2, 1883 to Efifie Swank, daughter 
of Benjamin and Ellen ( Coman) Swank, who were Ixirn in this county dur- 
ing the pioneer period. Here they grew to maturity, were married and estab- 
lished their home in the woods, and here they liecame well known and highly 
respected. Here Mrs. Olin grew to womanhood and was educated. 

Seven children have been born to Dr. Olin and wife, named as follows: 
Lester W., Blanche. Grace, Leveritt R., Leland E... Ruth and Reine. Four of 
these children are still at home, and all are living in Montgomery county. 

Fraternally, the Doctor belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons, hav- 
ing joined in 1882; and he belongs to the Knights of Pythias, which he joined 
in 1892. Religiously, he belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, lieing a 
trustee of the same. 



ROBERT L. ASHBY 



Human life is made up of two elements, power and form, and the pro- 
portion must be invariably kept if we would have it sweet and sound. Each 
of these elements in excess makes a mischief as hurtful as would be its defici- 
ency. Everything turns to excess; every good quality is noxious if unmixed, 



IOl8 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and to can"}- tlie danger to the edge of ruin nature causes each man's 
pecuHarity to superabound. One speaking from the standpoint of a farmer 
would adduce the learned professions as examples of the treachery. They 
are nature's victims of expression. You study the artist, the orator or the 
man of inventive genius and find their lives no more excellent than that of 
merchants, farmers or manufacturers. Many men get but glimpses of the 
delights found in nature in its various elements and moods, but there is 
always ample opportunities to enjoy life in its varied phases, whatever the 
profession. It depends upon the individual. Robert L. Ashby, for many 
years one of the most representative and best know n business men of Ladoga, 
Montgomery county, is one who takes a delight in existence. It is because 
he is in touch with the springs of life. He does not permit material things 
to supplant his better nature. His life has been filled with good deeds and 
kindly thoughts, and all who knew him entertain for him the highest regard, 
by reason of his industrious, upright and honorable career. 

Mr. Ashby was bom in Scott township, near Parkersburg, this county, 
November i8, 1847. He is a son of Thompson V. and Dulcenia ( Lockridge) 
Ashby, a complete history of whom appears elsewhere in this volume. 

Robert L. Ashby grew to manhood on his father's farm where he as- 
sisted with the work during the crop seasons, attending the neighborhood 
schools during the winter months. In 1875 he married Alice Fordice, a 
daughter of Asa and Mary (Chambers) Fordice. Her father was born in 
Morgan county, Ohio, and when a young man he traveled in several states, 
selling fanning machines, manufactured by Fordice and DeVoe, who oper- 
ated factories at Ladoga and several other places. Mary Chambers, men- 
tioned above, was born in Sullivan county, Indiana, and was a daughter of 
George and Ann (Allison) Chambers, natives of Kentucky. After his mar- 
riage Asa Fordice and his brothers Joseph, George, Nelson and Jesse bought 
farms south of Russelville and made their homes there, and it was there that 
Asa Fordice spent the rest of his life and there reared his family, and it was 
on his farm that Mrs. Ashby lived until her marriage. 

After his marriage Robert Asby began farming three miles southwest of 
Ladoga and there he continued to reside, successfully engaged in general 
farming and stock raising, until about 1902. He started out with one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. It was only partly cleared, but he was industrious 
and the years brought him prosperity. He added to his original holdings 
until he is now the owner of four hundred acres of valuable and well im- 
proved land. In August. 1893, he purchased the grain elevator at Ladoga 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. IOI9 

and went into the grain business on a large scale. Two or three years later 
he added the lumber yard to his business, and subsequently added cement and 
other building supplies, also a coal business. About 1903 he built a handsome 
and commodious residence on East Main street in Ladoga, which is his pres- 
ent home. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ashby have been born three sons and two daughters, 
all living, namely: Thompson V., who married Eva Grimes, li\es in Indi- 
anapolis, and they have tw^o sons, George and William; Fred ¥.. who. with 
his brother Thompson V.. is a member of the Wabash Veneer Company, of 
Indianapolis, and he lives in that city ; Wallace W., who lives in Ladoga, has 
largely superceded his father in the active management of both the farm and 
the elevator ; Dulcenia is teaching in the high school at Lapel, Indiana : Bertha 
is attending the Northwestern L^niversity at Evanston, a suburb of Chicago. 

Robert Ashby and wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Fra- 
ternally, he is a Mason, in which he has attained the rank of Knights Temp- 
lar. His three sons are all Scottish Rite Masons, and members of the Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Recently Mr. Ashby built a winter home at Dunedin, a Scottish settle- 
ment on the west coast of Florida and he and Mrs. Ashby now spend their 
winters at that pleasant tropical resort. Both the Ashbys and Fordices are 
of Scotch ancestrv. 



JAMES F. TAYLOR AND SON, JOHN TAYLOR. 

If any family in the section of Montgomery count}-, of which the beau- 
tiful and thriving little town of Ladoga is the hub, is prominent, it is the 
Taylor family, for members of it have played well their several roles in the 
local drama of civilization from the early pioneer period until the present 
time, doing whatever task that has been assigned them in promoting the 
material, civic and moral affairs of the community and lahnring industriously 
and honestly in legitimate vocations. 

John Taylor was born in July, 1S70. at Ladoga, and is a son of James 
F. and Elizabeth L. (Goodbar) Taylor. The father was linrn near Mount 
Sterling, Montgomery county, Kentucky, Novemljer 9. 1844. He is a son 
of Augusta and Ormilda (Allen) Taylor. When James F. Taylor was six 
years old, before there were any railroads at Ladoga and when this country 
was still in practically a primitive state, Augusta Ta\lor and wife moved 
with their tamilv cif eight children from tlie Blue ( irass state, coming by 



1020 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

wagon to near (ireencastle, Indiana, where tliey located on a farm, and 
there James ¥. grew to manhood and there he remained for some time, but 
about the time he attained his majority the rest of the family moved to 
JMissouri, but immediately came back to Edgar county, Illinois, locating near 
the city of I'aris, and later settling near Ridge Farm, Illinois, not far from 
Chrisman and there the}- remained. The mother and two of the sons are 
buried at Chrisman and the father is buried at Paris. 

James !•'. Taylor remained in Indiana, and here he was married in 
1865 to Elizabeth Goodbar-Crow, widow of \\'illiam Crow, and a daughter 
of Harvey and Louisa (Lockridge) Goodbar. She was born in ]S^(> and 
reared in Scott township, this county, where her people on both sides had 
lived from early pioneer days and where her parents were reared. Her 
father, Hai-vey Goodbar, was a son of John H. and Rachael (Hostetter) 
Goodbar, who, as early as 1829, came from Montgomery county, Kentucky, 
and settled in Scott township, Montgomery county, Indiana. John H. Good- 
bar was born in Virginia, and was a son of Joseph Goodbar, the latter being 
one of two boys born in England, and left, orphans, early in the eighteenth 
century. Joseph was taken b_\- a sea captain and he followed a seafaring 
life. Once returning to England and failing to find his brother, he emi- 
grated to America and settled in Virginia, where he reared his family. His 
son, John H., who came to Indiana in 1829, was among the first to teach 
school in Scott township, Montgomery county. He was trustee of this town- 
ship for a period of eighteen years successively, and served a term in the 
legislature at a salary of two dollars a day. He was widely known in west- 
ern Indiana and was influential in the affairs of Montgomery county. His 
death occurred in the year 1870. at the advanced age of eighty-seven years, 
after a long life of usefulness, loved and respected by all who knew- him. 

Harvey Goodbar, father of Mrs. Taylor, also came to Montgomery 
county, Indiana, in the year 1829 with the rest of the Goodbar family. tra\-- 
eling with horses and wagon, driving their cows before them, the trip re- 
quiring sixteen days. He was a most estimable citizen and died in early life. 

Before his marriage, James F. Taylor had been farming for himself, 
and after his marriage he continued to farm in Scott township, prospering 
through close application, the exercise of good judgment and foresight, and 
finally became the owner of a fine improved and productive farm of two 
hundred and fifty acres, and he continued to carry on general farming and 
stock raising on a large scale until 1882, when he left the farm, having ac- 
cumulated a competencv for his declining years, and moved to Ladoga in 



>rONTCOMERV COl'XTV. IXniAXA. T 02 I 

order to give his son. John, the Ijeneht of the schciols tiiere. Ihjwever. not 
content to be idle the elder Taylor soon went into the business in Ladoga 
of breeding, training and racing horses, and soon became widely and well 
known in this field of endeavor and met with great success, being an excc])- 
tiolally good judge of horses and knowing every phase regarding the care 
and training of them. He raised some of the finest horses ever known in 
this section of the Wabash countn,-. Among his first was old "Red Buck," 
a champion pacing horse and sire of many fine colts. Another notable one 
was "Rescue," bred at the stables of Powell Brothers in Pennsylvania, a trot- 
ting horse and sire of a number of fast horses. "Crisis" was a Kentucky 
bred stallion, a great show horse, often shown with "Que Allen," and sold 
for six thousand dollars when sexenteen \ears old, at Madison Square Gar- 
den, New York City. Another good horse was "Dispute," a track horse 
bought in Kentucky when two years old, and who attained a record of 
2:i5j4 on a half mile track with the old st}le sulkey, and he made it 2:0914 
on a mile track. He was the sire of "John Taylor," a horse with a record of 
2:0834, and winner of the M. and M. races at Detroit, Michigan, and a ten 
thousand dollar stake. "Dispute" was the first stallion to sire an M. and M. 
winner at that time. Mr. Taylor also owned "Egwood," who had a mark 
of 2:i4'4 on a half mile track. This fine animal was purchased in Ken- 
tucky l)y our subject at the same time he bought "Dispute." He afterward 
sold for a sum of fourteen thousand dollars and went t(j .\ustria. Mr. Tay- 
lor was also the owner of "Taylor McGregor," sired by "Jay McGregor," 
wht)se record was 2:o7'4, that sold for forty thousand dollars and went to 
Russia. "Jay McGregor" is the champion sire of trotters of the Cnited 
States, has four 2:10 trotters, in 1912, of whom "Baldy McGregor" has a 
record of 2 :o6^ at three }ears old. These splendid animals carried the 
name and fame of Mr. Taylor all over the United States, and he has long 
l:)een regarded as one of the leading horsemen of the country, and has ac- 
cumulated a handsome fortune through the handling of horses. He has also 
bought, bred and trained and raced a number of other horses who accpiired 
records of from 2:08^ to 2:30. During the past five years Mr. Taylor and 
his son ha\e been breeding pure bred Percheron horses for the benefit of the 
framers who desire heavy draft horses, and the fillies sired by bis stallions 
bring as high as six thousand dollars. 

John Taylor is the only child of James h'. Taylor and wife. He was 
ten years old when the family left the farm and located in their commodious 
and attractive residence in Ladoga. He received a good education, and. hav- 



I022 • MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INDIANA. 

ing grown up in the horse business and inheriting many of tlie sterhng attri- 
butes of his father, he gives promise of great success in this field of endea- 
vor. He has long trained and driven his father's race horses. He is known 
as a prompt starter, always up to the scratch when the race starts, and 
handles his horses well. 

In 1893 John Taylor married Clara Pierson, of Indianapolis, daughter 
of Jennings and Amanda (Browning) Pierson, a family well known in 
business and social circles in the Hoosier capital, where Airs. Taylor grew to 
womanhood and was educated. 

To our subject and wife three children were born, namely : Myrtle 
and Irene, living: and Vivian, who died when a year old. 

Both father and son ha\'e been life-long Democrats, but ha\'e never as- 
pired to be public men. 

The yi. and M. race winners are telegraphed all over America and 
Europe. The Ta\lor stables are known all over the United States and are 
visited by many admirers, some of them being noted horsemen from all 
parts of the country. 



DANIEL A. MYERS. 



We are always glad in writing the biographical side of these county his- 
tories to note that such a large number of the older citizens have spent their 
lives in the county. It indicates at once a successful, contented and 
worthy citizenship, and it also indicates that the country is good, for not 
many ambitious and energetic young men will remain on his "native heath" 
unless it promises as much in the future for the outlay of his energy as other 
localities, notwithstanding the pleasant associations of the old homestead 
and relati\es. Such a family as that represented by the gentleman whose 
name forms the caption of this sketch is a pride to any community and 
deserves all respect and praise, for reasons too patent and too numerous to 
need recounting here. 

Wv. Myers was born in Scott township, this county, on September 25, 
1841. He is a son of William and Lydia (Harshbarger) Myers, a complete 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this w'ork. The father of our subject 
did a great deal of teaming in the days before there was a railroad in ]Mont- 
gomery county, and when our subject was four years old he went with his 
father on one of his trips with his team to Lafayette, over in Tippecanoe 
county, and the old canal there with the boats going up and down made a 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. IO23 

great imression on the lad who lias nex'er forgotten this and nlher sights of 
the trip. 

Daniel A. Silvers grew to manhood on the homestead and there assisted 
with the general dnties during crop seasons, and in the winter months he 
attended the neighboring schools. He remained on his father's farm west 
of Ladoga until he was twenty-three years old. 

On October 6, 1864, Mr. Myers was united in marriage to Catherine 
Yenawine, who was born within ten miles of Louisville, Kentucky. She is 
a daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Bence) Yenawine, who brought her to 
Montgomery county, Indiana, when she was aljout eight years old, the fam- 
ily locating in Scott township, where she grew to womanhood and receixed 
her education. Her parents later removed to Coles county, Illinois. Mrs. 
Myers' folks made the trip from Kentucky to Lafayette, Indiana, thence 
south on the railroad on a flat car to Ladoga, the road still being unfinished. 

After the marriage of Daniel A. Myers and wife they bought the farm 
which they still occupy in the northern part of Clark township. He started 
with one hundred and fifty acres. Working hard and managing well, Mr. 
Myers prospered with advancing years, until he is now the owner of two 
hundred and forty acres. He formerly owned three hundred and twenty 
acres, but sold a part oi that, and he has also provided well for his family. 
He has been very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser, ranking, 
as he well deser\-es, with the leading husbandmen of the southern part of 
Montgomery county. 

Seven children were born to Daniel A. Myers and wife, named as fol- 
lows: Thomas E., who lives in the southern part of Walnut t(;iwnship, 
where he owns a fine farm of his own, married Lola Keller, and the\' have 
two children, Russell and Blanche; Minnie A. married Rufus Myers, of 
Jamestown, who owns about eight hundred acres of valuable land near 
there, and they have two children, Lillie and Lambert; William F., who 
owns and operates a good farm in the northern part of Walnut township, 
married Cora Gray, and they have two daughters, Hazel and Lida; Ellen 
married Lodi Bradley, and had one daughter, Lida, by that marriage. Mr. 
Bradley died January 18, 1902, and she subsequently married James Chafifin, 
and lives in the southeastern part of Clark township, and she has one daugh- 
ter by her second marriage, Helen. Elmer Myers, who lives in the south- 
western part of Walnut township, married Eliza Bowman ; John, a civil 
engineer, is at present in the Philippine Islands building a railroad : Clara 
H., the voungest child of our subject, married Movd Smith, and thev live in 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



the western part of \\'alnut township, and have two children, Raymond and 
Jolm. 

Daniel A. Myers Ijelongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and he and his wife are members of the Christian church. 



NATHANIEL HAMILTON. 

One of the leading agriculturists and business men of the northwestern 
part of Montgomery county is Nathaniel Hamilton, a scion of one of the 
sterling old families of this locality, and here he has been content to spend his 
life. While laboring for his individual advancement he has not neglected his 
larger duties as a neighbor and citizen. By deeds of kindness extending 
through a long period of years he has won and retained strong personal 
attachments, and though having passed his seventy-second milestone on the 
journey of life he is still in possession of his faculties, physical and mental, 
and bids fair to round out many more years of a happy old age. 

]\Ir. Hamilton was born on October 21, 1840 in Fountain county, Indi- 
ana, and he is a son of James and Louisa (Thompson) Hamilton. The 
father was born in Ohio and the mother in Kentucky. The former came to 
Montgomery county in 1832, when the country was little improved, and he 
later moved to Fountain county where he remained until 1850 when he re- 
turned to Montgomery county, locating on the farm of two hundred acres 
which our subject now owns. He devoted his life to farming. His family 
consisted of six children, namely: Catherine, who married Alfred Lofland; 
Nathaniel, of this review: Jane, who married Solon H. Brown; Albert lives 
in Waynetown : Sarah Louisa married John C. Bible : ]\Ielville who lives in 
this county. 

Nathaniel Hamilton received a good common school education in Mont- 
gomery county then entered an academy where he remained some time. In 
August, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, Seventy-second Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry in which he served about six months in the infantry, then joined 
\\"ilder's famous brigade, being mounted, and he participated in the battles 
of Hoover's Gap. Chickamauga, Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain. He 
was in the army of'the Cumberland under General Girard, in General Thomas' 
division. He proved to be a very faithful soldier, according to his comrades, 
and he was honorably discharged and mustered out at Indianapolis in 1865. 

After the war he returned home and resumed farming, which he has con- 



MOXTCOMKRV COUNTY, INDIANA. lOJ^ 

tinned on a large scale ami with great success to the present time, lie lias 
accumulated a competency and is vice-president of the Farmers llank at Win- 
gate. He has a finely improved farm, and a commodious dwelling, and a 
good grade of live stock is always to be seen about his place. 

Mr. Hamilton was married on May 20, 1880, to Mary Hunt, daughter 
of William and Mary (Rose) Hunt. Tliev were from Ohio and were carlv 
settlers here. 

Four children ha\e been born to our suliject and wife, nanielv : Galen 
is deceased: Hattie married Walter Ilaney ; ClintDn is deceased: \\'iniani Fay 
is at home. 

Politically, Mr. Hamilton is a Republican. He was township assessor 
for one term. Fraternally, he belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons at 
Wingate. He belongs to the Methodist church. 



THOMPSON V. ASHBY. 

Praise is always due to merit and especially where merit is the product 
of unassisted energy and perseverance. The self-made man commands our 
highest respect. Those struggles by means of which he has risen from ob- 
scurity to honorable distinction cannot fail to enlist sympathy and call forth 
our warmest applause. And, too, the record of a life well spent, of triumph 
over obstacles, of perseverance under difficulties and steady advancement 
from a modest beginning to a place of honor and distinction in the locality 
in which one devotes his efifort, when imprinted on the pages of history, 
present to the youth or a rising generation an exanii)le wcntliy of emulation 
and may also be studied with profit by those of more mature years whose 
achievements have not kept pace with their expectations. On the roster of 
the names of those who have been prominently identified with the develop- 
ment and upbuilding of Montgomery county that of the late Thompson V. 
Ashby merits a place of honor. From the age of ten years until his death 
he was a resident of this county, and in the early epoch of her development 
as well as in later years his energies were effectixely directed along normal 
lines of industry and enterprise, and in many w ays he made distinct contribu- 
tion to the progress of this favored section of the famous Waljash valley 
country. His life was one of signal integrity as well as usefulness, and such 
was his association with material and civic atTairs here oxer an extended 
(65) 



I026 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

epoch that a record of liis xaried, useful and honorable career be perpetuated 
in this publication. 

Thompson V. Ashby was Ixjrn April 25. 1818, in Shelby county, Ken- 
tucky, which locality furnished so many of the sterling citizens of Montgom- 
ery county, Indiana, where our subject came with the rest of the family in 
1828, and here he grew to manhood and recei\ed such education as the 
primitive schools of that early time afforded, for the country was new and 
sparsely settled when he arrived here, but here he was content to spend the 
rest of his days, having faith in its future. 

On Alay 30, 1844, he was united in marriage to Dulcenia Lockridge, 
who was born June 3, 1825, in Montgomery county, Kentucky. She was a 
daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Malone) Lockridge, the former born in 
1784 and the latter in 1786. Elizabeth Malone was a daughter of Andrew 
and Rachael (Ozier) Malone. Robert Lockridge was a son of John and 
Margaret (Henderson) Lockridge. Andrew Malone was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary war. The father of Dulcenia Lockridge died in Kentucky 
and her mother was left with nine children, three of whom were married 
and all but three grew to maturity. In the year 1835 t'''^ widow and all but 
one of the children came to Putnam count}', Indiana, and located south of 
Raccoon Station and there Dulcenia lived until her marriage. 

To Thompson V. Ashby and wife were born three children, namely: 
William Henry, Robert L., and Elizabeth Louise, the latter being now the 
wife of James Foster. They all live in Ladoga, Indiana, where they are very 
comfortably situated. 

Thompson V. Ashby was a farmer by profession and was \ery suc- 
cessful, becoming the owner of two excellent farms near the center of Scott 
township, aggregating about five hundred and sixty acres. He was a man of 
much business capacity and energy and managed his large landed estate with 
that care and discretion that always insured success and he ranked with the 
leading and most progressive agriculturists and stock men of Montgomery 
county during his day. His land was well improved and carefully operated, 
and he has a pleasant home which was noted for its hospitality. 

Mr. Ashbv was a well read man, keeping advised on the current topics 
of the dav, and he became well known locally as a debater, taking great in- 
terest in debating societies. In fact, he remained a great student all his 
life, was familiar with the best literature of the day, reading extensively of 
evervthing wherebv he might advance himself and he ranked, justly, too, as 
one of the most intellectual men of the southern part of the county. He 



M(1^■T(;(1MKR^• (•()^•^•T^•. Indiana. T027 

taugln schodl in liis yoim.mT (la\>. llr took a li\cly interest in elniiTli alVair- 
and was an clilcr in the I'roliyterian clinrcli. ilis lit'c was of such inlluence 
for good, in favor nl' relii;iiin and all lliat niaile for nKiral uplift. teni]R'fance, 
righteousness ami ijood eitixenshi]). lie did a .threat work a,i;ainst the lii|Ui)r 
traffic, and when near his death he read a temperance speech in i.ailnL;a, 
which was said b}" all furlunate enon.ijh In hear it to he the best e\er heard in 
this locaHty. 

^^r. Ashby was called to his eternal rest in April, i()(\v His widow is 
still living, making her home in Ladoga. She is an unusually well pre- 
ser\c(l woman, although now past eight\-eight )ears of a.ge. The advancing 
years, cruel to manw ha\-c left but ;i few threads of sih'er in her hair, and 
her e\es are clear and bright. Her bearing is as good as that of many \dung 
persons, and her face hears that uiunistak.able mark of one who.se life is li\ed 
uprightly, with kindly thoughts for others and charitable impulses. 



\\ILLI.\M M. I'R.WTZ. 

It would be iiard to tind a more painstaking and energetic tiller of the 
soil in Montgomery comity than William M. Frantz, o( Clark township, a 
man who has worked liard and nex'er depended ui)on others to his work 
or his planning, and the success that has come to him has l)een well de- 
served in e\ery respect and we are glad to gi\e his life record space in this 
volume along with other deser\-ing citizens of this locality. 

Mr. Frantz was born in Scott township, this county, about a mile west 
of Ladoga, on June 19, 1864. He is a son of Frank and Flizabeth ( Myers) 
Frantz. Matthias Frantz, the first of the name of whom we are informed, 
was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. September 3. i80(S. His 
mother's maiden name was Hants, and she was a si.ster of Katherine Hants, 
who married John Alyers, Sr.. and for a fuller account of this family the 
reader's attention is re.spectfully directed to the sketch of hVantz O. Myers, 
appearing in this volume. Matthias Frantz's mother died when the bov was 
four or five days old. and he was taken into the f.-iniily circle of his aunt .and 
uncle. Mr. and Mrs. John Myers. Sr. With them he went to P.otetourt 
county. \'irginia. and lived there on the Myers farm until he grew to man- 
hood. In 1831 he came on horseback with his uncle and his cousin. Henry 
Myers, from X'irginia to the present site of Ladoga. Indiana, to \isit John 
Myers. Jr.. who was here beginning on work-- of i^real imi)ortance to the new 



I028 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

community. Later the three men returned to the old Virginia home and 
prepared to move here, and it was in tlie fall of 1833 that the Myers family, 
including Matthias Frantz, made the long overland trip in wagons to Mont- 
gomery county, Indiana, locating in the \icinity of Ladoga, where they 
established permanent homes and took an active part in building up the com- 
munity. 

Matthias Frantz entered land two miles west and one mile north of 
Ladoga, and this he improved and established his home thereon, and here he 
married Sally Graybill. He followed farming all his life. He took an in- 
terest in public affairs and was a pioneer justice of the peace, was also a 
deacon in the Dunkard church. His death occurred on July i, 1898. his 
wife having preceded him to the grave on June 2t„ 1894. To them the fol- 
lowing children were born: James P., William H., Sarah J., Elizabeth, and 
John Frank. 

John Frank Frantz was born on January 18, 1838, on the farm where 
his father had settled in pioneer times, and there he grew to manhood and 
in 1859 married Elizabeth Myers, a daughter of William and Lydia (Harsh- 
barger) Myers. For her ancestry the reader is directed to the sketch of 
Frantz O. Myers, elsewhere in this volume. She was born November i, 
1838, a mile west of Ladoga, where her father, William Myers, was a pio- 
neer settler. Frank Frantz bought a farm north of her father's farm, and 
farmed there all his life. Six children were born of his first marriage; the 
first an infant son, died unnamed on December 19, 1859; Leona Ellen, born 
February 27, 1861, died February 17, 1864; the third and fourth, twin sons, 
died unnamed in infancy on March 16, 1863; William H., born June 19, 
1864; Sarah L., born August 29, 1866, was the wife of Frank Williams, and 
she died July 6, 1902. The mother of the above named children died July 
6, 1878, when William M., of this sketch, was fourteen years old. 

After the death of his first wife Frank Frantz married Emma Tapp, a 
daughter of John and Amanda Tapp. She was born and reared in Scott 
township, this county, three miles west of Ladoga. Two children were born 
of this union. May and Gaynelle. In 1897 Matthias Frantz, being feeble 
from advanced age, his family moved in with him to care for him. His 
death occurred on July i, 1898, and'his son, Frank, died about five weeks 
later, on August 9, 1898. His widow lives at Richmond, Indiana. 

William M. Frantz grew up on the farm west of Ladoga and he attended 
the public schools in his native locality. He continued to work on the home 
place until liis marriage, on September 13, 1888, to \'aletta Corn, daughter 



MOXTGO.MERV COUNTY, 



1029 



of George W. Corn and wife, of Clark li)\vnslii[), a coin])lete sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this work, l-'or a year after his nuirriage he continued 
on his father's farm, then moved to where he now lives in the northwest i)art 
of Clark township on the farm owned by Mrs. Frantz's father, and here lie 
has been successfully engaged in general farming and stock raising in part- 
nership with Mr. Corn. 

To Mr. and Mrs. I'^rantz one son has been born, ( ieorge !•".. whose birth 
occurred on October 13. 1894. ile is now in his junior year in the Ladoga 
high school. 

Fraternally, Mr. Frantz is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Ladoga. He is a quiet, home man. oliliging in disposition and 
fair in all his dealings. 



HEXRY T. THOMPSON. 

One of Ripley township citizens whom nature seems to have especially 
designed to be a tiller of the soil is Henry T. Tiiompson, one of the \'enerable 
and most highly honored native sons of Montgomery county. The pursuits 
of agriculture have afforded him high gratification, and in the conduct of his 
farm the principles he has held ha\e l)een peculiarly adapted to the success- 
ful development and improvement of the \aried elements of farm life. He 
has ever been energetic and enterprising and everything al)Out the place in- 
dicates that an experienced hand is at the helm. This gentleman is a well 
informed farmer, who, from a small beginning has built up a comfortable 
competence and is now enjoying the result of his industry and enterprise, 
his property having been acquired through his untiring diligence, foresight 
and good management. He is one of the oldest nati\c born residents of the 
western part of the county, and he has li\ed to see and take part in moment- 
ous changes here, having known the county when it was little im])roved, 
when the vast woods stretched in every direction and when the roads were 
ungraded, the streams unbridged, and when there were \ery few of the evi- 
dences of present-day civilization. 

Mr. Thompson was born in Montgomery C(junty, Indiana, as aljove in- 
timated, on October 17, 1837. He is a .son of .Alexander and Jane (Taylor) 
Thompson. The father was born on April 3, 1796, in the state of Pennsyl- 
vania, He received a limited education in the primitive schools of his time 
and he followed farming and the trade of mill wright during his active life. 
He came to Montgomery county. Indiana, in a very early dav. when this 



1030 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

countn- was practically a wilderness and here he established the future home 
of the family, enduring the usual prix-ations of life on the frontier. He was 
a rugged, hard-working and honest man, who never permitted hardships, no 
matter how appalling, to thwart him. He reached the advanced age of 
eighty-nine years, dying in May, 1885. The mother of our subject was 
born in Butler county, Ohio, on Alay 14, iSoi. and she grew to womanhood 
there and received what education she could in the rural schools. Her death 
occurred in 1867, at the age of sixty-six years. 

Fourteen children were born to Alexander Thompson and wife, four 
of whom are still living, namely: David, bom November 2, 1818; Elizabeth, 
born January 14, 1822; William, born September 26, 1823; Francis, born 
May 12, 1825; James, born September 2, 1826; Ruhana, born April 6, 1828; 
Isabelle, born December 28, 1829; Jane, born August i, 1831 ; Hester, born 
August 17, 1833; Nancy A., born May 17, 1835; Henry T., born October 
17, 1837; Sarah C, born May i, 1840; Joseph R., born December 22, 1841 ; 
the youngest child died in infancy. 

Henry T. Thompson grew to manhood on the home farm and did his 
share of the work about the place. He received such educational advantages 
as the earl}- schools afforded in his community in the early days here. He 
has ne\er married. He has always followed farming and general stock rais- 
ing. He is now the owner of a finely improved and valuable fami of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Ripley township. It is nearly all tillable, and it is 
rolling, so that but little tile is needed. All the improvements on the place, 
including the residence and outbuildings, were made by Mr. Thompson. He 
has a pleasant home, and keeps a good grade of live stock from year to year. 
He lives with his sister Jane, who is a widow, also a daughter-in-law. 

Politically, yir. Thompson is a Democrat, but he has never been espe- 
cially active in public matters. 



GEORGE W. HARSHBARGER. 

Allegiance to duty and a fixed purpose have been dominating factors in 
the life of George W. Harshbarger, one of Clark township's best known 
citizens. Indeed, such principles as he has followed always do more to ad- 
vance a man's interests than m.aterial wealth or fortituous environment. He 
is a worthy descendant of one of our most sterling old families, and many 
of the strong characteristics of his progenitors seemed to have manifested 



MdxrcoMian' ri)r\r\', ixdi.wa. 1031 

tllcm^el\c's in liiin, and he lias hccn nmsl carefnl tu keep untarnivlicd ihc 
lirilliaiit cscuU-heon oi tlic family name, licin,^' nutcil fnr his huncsly. hiis])i- 
talit}- anil his readiness tn assist in ihe |)niL;ressi\e mii\ement-> ^i his enm- 
nuinity. 

Mr. Harshl)ai"tjer was hurn in I'lark low nsliip, .Miintg(.imery connty, 
October 20, 1S38, a sun of Jacob .M. and Mary (Myers) I larshbar-er, the 
niotlier having been the daughter of IIenr\- Myers, jjrother of John Myers, 
Jr. Botli the Harshbarger and Myers ancestry will be found on other pages 
of this work. 

CJeorge W. Ilarshbarger grew to manhood, where he now lives in 
Clark township. He attended the coninion schools in his native community, 
the higii school at Ladoga, and later the agricultural college at Lafayette. 
He continued farming on the home place, and in 1881 married Eva Canine, 
daughter of Cornelius and Keziah Canine. She was born at Waveland, this 
county, and grew up on a farm two miles east of that town and there she 
was educated and lived until her marriage. 

Cornelius Canine was a son of Raljjh Canine and his tirst wife. Cor- 
nelius Canine was born antl reared near \\'a\eland and farmed there all his 
life. He was an active Democrat and was a member of the liaptist church. 
He was a broad-minded man, ujjright and honoral:)le. His parents had 
come to that locality in a very early da\- and cleared and developed a farm. 

The parents of our subject induced him to remain on the home farm, 
rebuild the dwelling and improve the place, the elder Ilarshbarger desiring 
to retire from active life. He accordingly remodeled and enlarged the old 
home, installing modern heating and lighting plants and many of the con- 
veniences not usually found in the country. The mother of our subject was 
called to her eternal rest on June 17, 1899, and the father continued making 
his home with his son, George W., until ^Irs. Davidson, sister of our sul)- 
ject, was left a widow, in 190S, whereupon the father went to li\\e witli lier. 
Since that time our suliject has hail full charge of the farm where he now 
lives. He is the owner of six hundred and fifteen acres, all in close proxim- 
ity of his liome, all well improved and well kept, and here general farming 
and stock raising are carried on extensively, a specialty being made of all 
kinds of high grade live stock. On the place is to lie seen manv good barns 
and outbuildings. 

Mr. Harshl>arger, wife and children belong to the Christian church at 
Ladoga. Ever since the Fair Association was organized our suljject has 
been a member, and has done much for its success. He is a member of the 



1032 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Masonic Order at Ladoga, and he and his wife belong to the Order of East- 
ern Star. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harshbarger iiave three children, namely: Earl M., born 
September 14, 1885; IMary Ethel, born October 29, 1886; Everett, born 
August 25, 1894. Earl was married in 1908 to Mabel Thompson Batman, 
a daughter of Dr. W. F. Batman, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
work. Both Earl and his wife are graduates of the Ladoga high school, and 
the former attended Wabash College and Purdue University, and his wife 
attended Northwestern University at Chicago. Earl Harshbarger is en- 
gaged in the insurance and real estate business in Ladoga and is also suc- 
cessfully operating a one hundred and twenty acre farm of his father's. 
Ethel Harshbarger is a graduate of the Ladoga high school, and later she 
attended Northwestern University; :she is an accomplished musician, and 
is a general favorite in Ladoga society; she was married in September, 1909, 
to Richard Dean Squires, a native of Kentucky, and for several years en- 
gaged in teaching in Indiana and was quite successful. Fifteen months be- 
fore his marriage he was chosen superintendent of Ladoga schools, which 
position he held two years. He is now superintendent of schools at Carlisle, 
Nicholas county, Kentucky. To tliis union has been born a daughter, Eva 
Dean Squires, now about two }ears old. Everett Harshbarger is in his 
senior year in the Ladoga high school. He will later enter the agricultural 
college of Purdue University. 

Georgge W. Harshbarger is a man of public spirit, but never an ofifice 
seeker. He was, active in procuring the services of a farm expert to assist 
in planning and directing farm work in an intelligent, up-to-date manner 
in Clark township. All movements calculated to better the township in any 
way have in him an ardent supporter, and he and his family are deserving of 
the high esteem in which thev are universally held. 



V. E. CRAIG. 



Conspicuous among the progressive business men of Franklin township. 
Montgomery county, is the gentleman whose name introduces this article. 
Coming of an old and well known family, members of which were intimately 
connected with the rise and progress of this section of the community, he takes 
a pardonable pride in the parts they performed in the transformation of this 
locality from a wilderness into its present proud position among its sister 
counties of the commonwealth. 




V. E. CRAIG 



.MO.NTC.OMKRV fOLNTV, INDIAN. 



'O33 



\ . E. Craig, widely known and successful merchant at the town of 
Darlington, Montgomery county, was born in this county on December 25, 
1853. He is a son of Robert A. and Liddy (Martz) Craig. The father of 
our subject was born 'in this coimty, also, the date of his birth being June i, 
1832, and here he grew to manhood, was educated in the old-time schools and 
here he devoted his life to general farming, developing a good farm from the 
virgin soil, living to see the great transformation that took place here, and 
he became popular with his neighbors and vast acquaintances for he was an 
honest man and a good citizen. His family consisted of eight children, three 
of whom are still living. They were named, Marshall, is deceased; \'. E.. 
of this review; Alma L., Charles W., Mary E., Isaac W.. living- in Darlington; 
Iva A., are all deceased; John W., the youngest is still li\ing. 

The death of Robert A. Craig occurred on July 20, 1890. His wife was 
bom in Ohio in 1833, and her death occurred in Februar}-, 1902. 

\'. E. Craig grew to manhood on tlie liome farm and there he worked 
during the crop seasons when a boy. and in the winter time he attended the 
common schools. On March i. 1877 he was married to Armitta Betts, who 
was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, April 22, 1855, and here she grew 
to womanhood and received a common school education. She is a daughter 
of Francis and Henrietta (Stewart) Betts. The union of our sulijcct and 
wife has been without issue. 

V. E. Craig began life for himself as a farmer, following that vocation 
for a period of twelve years, during which he got a good start. He then came 
to Darlington and went into tlic grayi business, under the firm name of Craig 
& Kinler. He remained in this line of endeaxor fur five years, enjoying a 
large business. Then his partner died and Mr. Craig discontinued the 
business and turned his attention to real estate which he followed two years, 
then in 1898 he started a grocery store in the east part of Darlington, and he 
has been in his present location for about five years. He enjoys a large and 
lucrative patronage, his store being known as the Central Grocery. It is well 
stocked with staple and fancy groceries at all seasons. He owns a nice home 
in Darlington, and has a farm in Tippecanoe county. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, and he has l)een quite prominent, locally, 
in political and public affairs. He was for seven years a member of the city 
council of Darlington, and was for three years a member of the school board. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the Masons and the Improved Order of Red 
Men, also the Knights of Pythias. Religiously, he belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



]034 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JAMES AI. OTTERMAN. 

The name of James AI. Otterman, one of the progressive and successful 
citizens of Clark township, needs no praise by the biographer, for it has stood 
for clean ii\ing and honorable actions toward his fellow men during his life 
here of more than three score years, for he has sought at all times, no matter 
how trying the circumstances, to maintain the dignity of the old family of 
which he is a most creditable representative. 

Air. Otterman was torn on Alarch 20, 1S50, in this township and 
county. He is a son of Lewis Otterman, Jr., and wife, a complete sketch of 
\\hom appears elsewhere in this work. 

James AI. Otterman received a common school education and he lived 
on the homestead in this township until he was thirt)'-five years old. In 
1885 he married Alinnie Stover, daughter of Samuel and Xancy Lee 
Stover. She was born and reared in Scott township, Alontgomery county, 
and here received her education in the public schools, and here she resided 
until her marriage. Samuel Stover was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, 
in 1820. He was a son of George and Hetty Stover. Samuel Stover was 
one of a large family who moved to Alontgomery county, Indiana, when he 
was twelve years old, about 1832, and located in Section 36, Scott town- 
ship, on what is now the Bymaster farm. Samuel Stover was a carpenter in 
his younger days. In the early fifties he married Nancy Lee Daugherty, 
who was born and reared in his neighborhood. She was a daughter of 
James and Nancy Ann (Mills) Daugherty. The Daughertys came to Alont- 
gomery county about 1 830 from Bullitt county. Kentucky, and located in the 
southwestern part of Clark township, about three-fourths of a mile north of 
the Putnam county line. 

After his marriage Samuel Stover took up farming, which he followed 
the rest of his life. His father gave him eighty acres in Section 25, Scott 
township. As he prospered he purchased additional land until he owned a 
large and \'aluable farm, and here he lived the rest of his days. He and his 
wife were active in the work of the church, and he was a trustee of Hawk 
Creek Christian church. His wife was a Baptist. The death of Samuel 
Stover occurred on June 20, 1889, his widow surviving until Alarch 14, 1908. 

James AI. Otterman farmed in partnership with his brother after he 
was twenty-fi\e years old. After his marriage he farmed for himself on the 
place where he now resides, in Section 23, and he is now owner of three 
hundred and fifteen acres of valuable and productive land, for the most part 



MONTC.UMKKV aUNTV. IX |)I A.\A. IO35 

under a liit^h ^lalc of inii>ru\<.-mciU and cultivation, and all near his honiu. 
He is canvniy on !;eneral farming and stock raising on an extensive scale, 
and has a ])leasant home and numerous outbuildings. 

To -Mr. and .Mrs. Otterman two children have been Ijorn. namely: i.elah. 
horn April i o. 1S89; and Carl S.. horn January iS. 1S93. The latter is now 
taking a course in agriculture and stock juilging at the agricultural selionl at 
Lafayette. 

Lelah Otterman is an accomplished musician, both vocal and instru- 
mental. Both she and her brother graduated from the Ladoga high school. 

Mr. Otterman is a Democrat, and has for several years been a member 
of the advisory board of his township. He takes an active interest in the 
affairs of his party, and from the days of Horace Greeley has contrilmted 
generously to the sujijiort of Democracy. He is a member of the llorse 
Thief Detective Association, and he and his wife belong to the Christian 
church. 



LEWIS OTTERMAX. 



One of the well known and influential citizens of Clark townshii), Mnul- 
gomery county, of a jiast generation who is now sleeping in "that low green 
tent whose curtains ne\er otitward swing" was the late Lewis Otterman. a 
man who was the ])ossessor of many commendable characteri.stics of head 
and heart and whose name is deserving of perpetuation on the pages of local 
history, and his career might well serve as a pattern for the youth, lie is 
remembered as a man of rare foresight and keen discernment and good judg- 
ment, and he was often called upon for advice in matters of business and 
often served as arbitrator. .Although well qualified he refused to acce])t of- 
fice, but was looked to as a leader in local material and public affairs. The 
Otterman family have always been noted for their somewhat retiring dispo- 
sitions, never pu.shing them.selves forward in the limelight, attending very 
closelv to their own business affairs, and they ha\e e\er been highly estteemed 
since coming to this locality in the early pioneer days to the ])resent. 

Mr. Otterman was born .Septeml)er 1. iSii. m what is now rulnam 
county. West X'irginia. a son of Lewis ()tterman. .Sr.. who was born in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, but was reared in Virginia, lie mar- 
ried Glory Null, daughter of Philip Xull. Her father was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, from which state he migrated to Xorth Carolina, where he married 
Margaret I'.ushong. lie I'oUowed farming and the tanning trade tmtil the 



1036 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

commencement of the Revolutionary war, then entered the Continental 
army, serving throug-hont the conflict, under command of Generals Marion, 
Washington and Morgan, and for bra\ery on the field was promoted to the 
rank of captain. 

After his marriage Lewis Otterman, Sr., returned to his native town 
and subsequently moved from there to Putnam county in the western part 
of Virginia, now West \"irginia, where he followed farming for about 
eighteen years. At the end of that time he came, with his family, to In- 
diana, and first located on land that he entered from the government in 
Clark township, comprising eighty acres of timber, which he at once began 
to clear. A few years later he sold that and moved to a farm about five 
miles east of Ladoga, where he lived until his death, in 1858. In early life 
he was a Lutheran, later a Christian. His first wife died and he married a 
second time, his last wife being Mrs. Jessie Ruth. He was the father of 
tweh-e children, all of whom grew to maturity and six of whom reached ad- 
vanced ages, John, Lewis. Jr., Philip, Elisha, Eliza, Joseph, George, Mary, 
Elizabeth, Sam, Henry and Elijah. Elijah, Elisha and Eliza were triplets. 

Lewis Otterman, Jr., was eighteen years old when he came with his 
parents to the wilds of western Indiana. When twenty-one years old he 
started out in life for himself, with no wnrldly possession Ijut an ax. He first 
worked for his Uncle Myers and afterwards with his Uncle John at a salary 
of eight dollars per month. He saved his earnings and entered eighty acres 
of land. During the four years following he made enough by the month to 
procure one hundred and sixty-five acres of land. 

In the fall of 1836, after his marriage to Hettie Pefley, he took pos- 
session of his land and spent the remainder of his life on the same. His 
wife was a daughter of Samuel Pefley and wife, who came to this county in 
1835. He was a hard worker and good manager and developed one of the 
finest fanning properties in the southeastern part of the county, and when 
old age came on he divided his land among his children, having had at that 
time between eleven hundred and twelve hundred acres of valuable and pro- 
ductive land. He retained three hundred and fifty acres. His large success 
was eminently deserving", since lie worked his way up from the bottom of 
the ladder without assistance. 

Although a very busy man, he found time to render aid in the general 
development of his community, being especially a friend to the free school 
system and education in general. He was a life-long Democrat, and during 
the Civil war was a strong L^nionist and Abolitionist. He was a pronounced 



MONTC.OMERV COL-NTV, INDIANA. I O37 

temperance man. lie ne\er wnnlil accept otiice. ami when appciinted 
county commissioner, refused to serve. .Mthouj^h not a heliexer in man- 
made creeds, he was an honorable. Bible-following man, living his religion 
every day; however, he was very influential in the upbuilding of the local 
Christian church, and was a member of that denomination for ii\er half a 
century. He was originally connected with the Hawk Creek church, hut in 
1847 he and several others were instrumental in slarting what is now known 
as Christian Chapel in his own neighborhood, and he was also one of the 
founders of the Sunday school. He ser\-ed both as deacon and elder of the 
church and conlril)uted liberally of his means toward its su])])ort. 

Seven children were born to Lewis Otterman, jr., and wife, namely: 
Ann Eliza married Isaac Smith, of Boone county; Sarah Jane married 
Josiah Bradley, of Clark township ; Samuel Henry, who became a prosperous 
fanner in his native township; James M., a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this volume; George W. became a farmer in Clark township; John 
F. and Lewis C. both died many years ago. 

The death of Lewis Otterman occurred on June 13, 1896, at the ad- 
\anced age of eightv-five vears. 



SILAS F. KYLE. 



No history of Montgomery county, purp(jrting to go into the industrial 
life as well as other leading phases of our complex civilization here would be 
complete were there failure to make proper mention of Silas F. Kyle, one 
of the foremost citizens and substantial business men of the town of Ladoga, 
and not only as a busy man of affairs is" he eligible for representation in 
these pages, but also as a citizen, for he is public spirited and enterprising in 
his advocacy of progressive methods to an unwonted degree; as a friend and 
neighbor he combines the cjualities of head and heart that wins confidence 
and commands i^espect. He is a good manager, makes a success of whate\er 
he turns his attention to, possessing sound judgment and keen foresight, 
and who believes in pressing forward in all lines, Ijelieving with Tennyson, 
■'that the old order changeth'' and should be supplanted by the new and 
better. He is one of our worthiest native sons and has come down to us from 
the pioneer epoch, his life here of over seventy years ha\ing witnesseil pheno- 
menal changes, such as the vast forests giving way under the sturdy stroke 
of the woodmen to fertile fields, and grou])S of log caliins springing up into 



1038 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

thriving marts of trade. He lias not only witnessed but taken part in this 
transformation. 

Mr. Kyle was Ixjrn in the southern part of Clark township, Montgom- 
ery county, on April 4, 1841. He is a son of George E. and Elizabeth 
(Ashby) Kyle, the mother having been a daughter of Abraham and Eliza- 
beth (Hohimer) Ashby. The Ashbys have been a prominent family in this 
locality from the early days. A complete record of them is found on other 
pages of this work. 

George E. Kyle was born in Maryland, was a son of Nicholas G. Kyle 
and wife. Nicholas G. Kyle came from Germany and was probaljly mar- 
ried tliere. George E. Kyle and Elizabeth Ashby were married in Kentucky, 
from which state they came to Montgomery county, Indiana, alxnit 1829. 
He entered eighty acres from the government, in Clark township, and the 
subject of this sketch still has the deed of the government, signed by Presi- 
dent Andrew Jackson. 

To George E. Kyle and wife six children were born, namely; William 
died when twenty years old, Mary and James both live in Kansas: Silas F., 
of this sketch ; John and Lettie S. are both deceased. 

After the death of the mother of the above named children, the father 
married Elizabeth Hamilton and the following children were Ixjrn to them : 
Nicholas G., Mildred, Nancy, Sallie, Lottie and George. None of them now 
live in Montgomery county. 

George E. Kyle was killed by a locomotive at Ashby' s Station, August 
14, 1 87 1, being thrown sixty-eight feet and died instantly. He was both a 
farmer and blacksmith. He cleared his land and began farming on the 
eightv acres; however, he depended principally on his shop for support. He 
also loaned considerable money to* adva:ntage. He finally became the owner 
of six hundred acres. He was a business man of rare foresight and sound 
judgment, and he never lost on a loan but once. His honesty was unques- 
tioned. 

Silas F. Kvle remained on the home farm until he was sixteen years of 
age, then, with his father, went into the mercantile business at Forest Home 
on the south line of the count}- and remained there from 1858 until the fall 
of 1875, then sold out and came to Ladoga, where he bought a partly fur- 
nished store building, furnished it and started a general store. In 1903, 
having been successful, he built another building on the corner west of it at 
Main and Washington streets, joining it to his other building. He also has 
a fine home in Ladoga, which was built at a cost of ten thousand dollars and 
is modernlv furnished. 



MONTGOMKRV COUNTY, INDIANA. I O39 

Mr. Kyle rclircd fnnn the mcrcaiUile Inisiiu^s in kjo^, aflrr liavini; 
enjoyed a verv extensive trade for many years. Since then he lias carried mh 
an electric light and coal business. In partnership with jacnl) ]■:. Lidikay 
he assists in operating the electric light plant at Ladoga, and llie\ ha\ c made 
a great success ol this venture. 

Mr. Kvle has taken an active interest in local public atiairs for sume 
time and he has more than once been nominated for local office against his 
wishes, however: and in the county convention he once refused nomination 
for county treasurer. hVaternally. he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
having belonged to this lodge for over thirty years. 

Mr. Kvle was married to Susanna McGinnis on December ,^, 1863. 
She was bom in Putnam county, Indiana, and is a daughter of Joseph T. and 
Eliza ( DeVore) McGinnis. The date of Mrs. Kyle's birth is December 3, 
1844. and she grew to \yomanhood and was educated in her nati\-e vicinity at 
Clo\erdale. Her parents were both worthy representatives of typical pio- 
neer families of that section. On December 3, 1863, slie and Mr. Kyle were 
married. For almo.st fifty years she was the faithful helpmeet of our sub- 
ject, working with him, through toil and trial, through success and achie\e- 
ment, the increasing responsibilities of home and parenthood drawing them 
ever close. Ever since they came to Ladoga their home and family were in- 
seperably entwined with the commercial, educational, religious and social life 
here. Any considerable acquaintance with Ladoga has meant of necessity 
some acquaintance with Mr. Kyle and his family. Mrs. Kyle's chief interest 
was in her home and to its welfare she delighted to make her richest con- 
tribution. She found life's sweetest joy in giving self for service, in feeding 
the hungry, clothing the naked and ministering to suffering. Selfish in- 
terests never determined her policy in life. The lasting impression her many 
friends had of her was that she gave more thought to doing her own part 
well than to criticise others for their failures. As a wife she was of a high 
type of faithfulness and sympathic devotion and at her death her children 
said in all sincerity. "You cannot exaggerate in prai.se of mother." She was 
a woman of beautiful Christian character and faith, and did much good in 
her humble sphere of wife and mother. She was called to her eternal rest 
on November 2-/. 1912, after having been an earnest, faithful member of the 
Christian church since she was twelve years of age. 

To Silas F. Kyle and wife were born six children, one of wliom is de- 
ceased, namely: Eliza Florence is the wife of William C. Rapp. the car- 
riage manufacturer of Ladoga: Etta died when six months old: Hattie mar- 



1040 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ried John Lindskogg, a native of Sweden, who died four years after his mar- 
riage, and his widow now hves with her father in Ladoga: Minnie is the 
wife of Edward Ashby, who is at the head of the canning company at 
Ladoga; Walter E., who is now at Ladoga, was for some time in Iowa trav- 
ehng for John V. Earweil Company; NelHe is the wife of L. Ben ^iLiyhall, 
who was in the mercantile business at Ladoga for a number of years. 



CHARLES HAYWOOD. 

Charles Haywood, president and general manager of the Union Elevator 
Company, of New Richmond, was born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, on 
August 13, 1873. He is a son of E. F. and Margaret (Peed) Haywood. 
The father was born in Tippecanoe county and the mother near Shawnee 
Mound, this state. They grew to maturity and were educated in their re- 
spective communities, and they devoted their lives to general fanning up to 
ten years ago, when Mr. Haywood left the farm and moved to Lafayette, 
Indiana, and became vice-president of the City National Bank. He has been 
very successful in a business way and is well-to-do. He owns large tracts of 
valuable land and handles a fine grade of live stock in large numbers. He is 
one of the well known and influential citizens of Tippecanoe county. 

Eight children were bom to E .F. Haywood and wife, namely : Edward, 
Mattie, Ella, Charles, Emma, Henry and George are both deceased; and 
Frances, who is the youngest. 

Charles Haywood grew to manhood in liis native county and he received 
his primary education in the schools at Goosenipple, later entering Purdue 
University, where he studied three years, after which he farmed for four 
years, during which he got a good start. He then entered the grain business 
at New Richmond, Montgomery county, and is still actively engaged in this 
line of endeavor, having become one of the best known grain men in this part 
of the state. He is president and general manager of the Union Elevator 
Company, and a very extensive business is carried on all over this locality. 

Mr. Haywood was married on June 12, 1899, to Henrietta E. Raub, 
daughter of Edward and Henrietta (Ruth) Raub, the father a native of 
Ohio and the mother of Boston, Massachusetts. 

Six children have ben born to our subject and wife, namely, Ruth 
Mildred, Helen, Richard R., Valverta, Louis and Charles. 

]\Ir. Havwood is a member of Romney Lodge, No. 144, Free and Ac- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. IO4I 

cepted Masons, also beIoi\t;s to the Conimanden- aiul the Consistory, also the 
Ancient Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. iNlurat Temple, Indianapolis. 
He is prominent in Alasonic circles. He is the oldest meinber of the Mystic 
Shrine in Montgomery county. Religiously, he belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and is faithful in his support of the same. 



WILLIAM L. BATALVX. 

Dr. William V. Batman, physician antl surgeon, of Ladoga, Montgom- 
ery county, Indiana, was born near Bainbridge, in Putnam county, Lidiana, 
on October 22, 1858. His ancestors were from Great Britain, probably from 
Whales. His parents were Elijah A. and Lydia (Gillen) Batman. Elijah A. 
Batman was a native of Putnam county, Indiana, was a son of Thomas and 
Sarah (Cornell J Batman. Thomas Batman and wife came from near Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, in pioneer times and setled near Bainbridge and there estab- 
lished their home. Sarah (Cornell) Batman was one of the same family 
that gave the name to Cornell L'ni\-ersity. Her parents were William and 
Mary Cornell. Her father, William Cornell, was born in 1762, and at the 
age of fifteen enlisted in the New York state troops to fight for the colonies 
in the war for independence. He saw much hard service, came into close 
touch with George Washington, whom he fairly idolized; and even in his old 
age he was ready to resent and even to fight at any slur against the name uf 
Washington. 

Elijah A. Batman grew up near Bainbridge, and became a well known 
farmer and stock raiser. He was a man of good size and phxsique. weighed 
about two hundred pounds and was finelx' formed and handsome in appear- 
ance. His life was spent in Putnam county, Indiana, where he was highly 
thought of and respectetl. His last days were spent in Roachdale. where his 
death occurred. 

Dr. Batman's mother, Lydia ((iilley) Batman, was a daughter of Willis 
Y. Gillen and Melinda (Coombs) Gillen. The Coombs women were famous 
beauties in their day and lived near Mt. Sterling, Kentuck\. in a region noted 
for fair women. Her father came to Putnam county, lndi;ina. in ])ioneer 
times, and there she was reared to womanhood. 

Dr. \\'illiam I-". Batman grew to manhood on the home farm near Bain- 
bridge, and there laid the foundation for a strong constitution that has stood 
(66) 



I04;2 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

him so well in hand in the practice of his arduous professional duties. His 
early education \\as received in the common schools and Bainbridge Aca- 
demy. At the age of seventeen he began reading medicine in the office of 
Dr. R. French Stone, then of Bainbridge, now of Indianapolis, a physician of 
much learning ,a writer of note and later a professor in the Central Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons at Indianapolis. He studied three years 
with Dr. Stone, then in 1878 entered Rush Medical College, at Chicago, 
where he was taught in surgery by such eminent authorities as Gunn and 
Parkes, and took a special course in chemistry under Professor Haines. 
The following year he entered Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, an 
institution that was second to none at that time. The faculty included a 
number of the most eminent physicians of their day, men like Doctors S. D. 
Gross, J. M. DcCosta, and Robert Barthalow. While there he also took a 
special course in surgery under Dr. J. Ewing Mears, one of the most eminent 
surgeons of Philadelphia. Dr. Batman was graduated from JefTerson Medi- 
cal College in March, 1880, and then entered upon the practice of medicine 
at Roachdale, being associated with Dr. W. C. Harris. 

After three years practice at Roachdale, Dr. Batman went to Bellevue 
Hospital, New York City, where he received a certificate in Physical Diag- 
nosis. In this subject he was instructed by Professor Edward Janeway. 
He also attended lectures and saw special operations at the Woman's Hos- 
pital, bv the famous Dr. T. Gaillard Thomas, and took a special course of in- 
struction from this famous specialist. He saw Dr. Emmett's operations in 
Gynecology. He attended the clinical lectures of Loomis and Otis, and heard 
the last course of lectures delivered by the late Professor Austin Flint. 

Being by this time well prepared in all branches of medicine and sui-gery. 
Dr. Batman returned to active practice at Roachdale, in 1884. There he 
remained six years, building up a large practice. In the fall of 1889 he re- 
moved to Ladoga, where he has practiced ever since, having practiced at 
Ladoga longer than any other physician now here. He has an exceptionally 
well equipped office; and notwithstanding the fact that his practice is large 
and its demands often arduous, he has remained a close student of the de- 
velopments of his profession, and keeps up with the advances in the practice. 
While in Putnam county, he was president of the Putnam County Medical 
Society. He belongs to the Montgomery County Medical Society and the 
Indiana State Medical Society. In 1890 he was a delegate from this county 
to the American Medical Association at Nashville, Tennessee. In 1896 and 
1897 he was vice-president of the State Medical Society. 



MONTGOMKRV COUXTV, INDIANA. IO43 

His contributions to professional literature relate to important papers 
and reports of cases, which have been read before tlie organizations with 
which he is connected. 

Close application to his profession has not made him narrow, lie is 
acti\e in the Democrat party, of which he is a stanch adherent. 

In lodges, he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and of the Masons, 
both at Ladoga. In Masonry he has taken every degree of the York rite, 
his membership in the Chapter and Knights Templar l^eing at Crawfordsville. 
He is also a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, his membership being at Murat Tem- 
ple in Indianapolis. 

Dr. Batman is a great lover of music and became a skilled violinist. From 
his southern ancestry he inherits their fondness for fine horses, of which he 
is a judge, and usually he has a valuable string of them in his stable. 

August 29, 1882, Dr. Batman was united in marriage with Miss Ida E. 
Harris, daughter of his old partner at Roachdale, Dr. \V. C. Harris and Jane 
(Dodd) Harris. Her father was an old and popular physician of Roach- 
dale and well laiown. She was born and reared in Putnam county, where she 
received a good education. 

Dr. Batman and wife have one daughter, Mabel T., wife of Earl M. 
Harshbarger, of Ladoga. 

For those who know Dr. Batman, no comment is necessary, either as lo 
his character or as to his standing as a ]>h}-sician. However, history being 
written more for those who shall come after us, it is proper to say that he 
seems to be not only well educated as a physician, but naturally ada])ted to 
the practice, in which he is unusually successful. As a man in his community 
he is regarded as unselfish, public spirited, a good neighbor, and a thorough 
gentleman of upright character. 



NATHAN HULETT. 



It would be indeed presumptuous for the biographer to make any at- 
tempt to introduce to the readers of this work the name of Nathan Hulett, 
of Clark township, for he is known practically to everybody in Montgomery 
county where his long, honorable and industrious life has been spent and 
where he has labored for the general good of the locality while advancing his 
individual interests. So. his large material success and the universal high 
regard in which he is held have been well merited. 



I044 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Hulett was born in tlie township and count}- where he is still resid- 
ing, having first seen the light of day here on September 28, 1846. He is a 
son of Gilson and Winefrede (Clark) Hulett. Gibson Hulett's parents came 
from Kentucky and settled in Putnam county, Indiana, probably near Green- 
castle, in an early day, and in that couty Winefrede Clark was born, and she 
and Gilson Hulett were married in Clark township, Montgomery county. 
She was a daughter of Willis and Hannah (Allen) Clark. Her parents came 
from Kentucky in a very early day, her mother having made the trip here on 
horseback. These parents later moved across into Clark township, Mont- 
gomery county, buying a farm in the southeastern part of the township, and 
Mr. Hulett still owns part ni their farm. Gilson Hulett purchased part of 
their farm and Mr. Hulet still owns part of that. The death of Gilson 
Hulett occurred in August, 1851, when Nathan Hulett was about five years 
of age. He left a wife and two children, Xathan and John W. The latter 
li\ed and died in Clark township. The mother afterwards married George 
Morris and lived in Clark township, until late in life when she and her hus- 
band moved to a farm he got near Danville. She spent her last years in 
Clark township, dying there during the early seventies. 

Nathan Hulett grew up on the home farm in Clark township, remain- 
ing there until his mother moved to near Danville. When a young man he 
worked out at farming in that locality. 

On March 26, 1868 he married ]\lary Grantham, daughter of Wesley 
and Caroline (]\Iiller) Grantham. Wesley Grantham was a son of Jesse 
Grantham and wife, who were early settlers in Jackson township, Putnam 
county, and there Wesley Grantham grew to manhood and married Caroline 
Miller, also a native of Putnam county. She was a daughter of James and 
Nancy ( Lee) Miller. After his marriage Wesley Grantham lived in several 
different localities before establishing a permanent home. He lived a short 
time in Clark township, this county, later moved to Missouri, but finally 
located about seven miles southeast of Ladoga. There he bought a farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres, now owned by Mr. Jeffries and adjoining the 
Miller farm. There the children grew up, and there Mr. Grantham farmed 
until about 1880 then moved into I^doga and retired from active work on 
the farm and gave the younger children a better chance to attend school. 
Later he bought the T. H. ]\Iessick farm northeast of Ladoga, crossed by 
the Midland railroad. The title to right of railroad to run across the farm 
was in the legislature when he bought it and of course he became involved in 
the suit in that wav. The suit continued in court over eighteen vears. until 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. IO45 

after Mr. Grantham's death, when the (Iranthani estate linally was xineh- 
cated by the CDiirts. Besitle tlie Messick farm he purchased s':>mc land at tlie 
southeasf edge of Ladoga now owned by Rev. Brooks, and also a tract a mile 
east of Ladoga known as the old Sammy Brown farm. 

He was an ardent prohibitionist and spent both time and money in 
furthering the fight against liquor. He was a life-long member of the 
Methodist church and was a liberal contributor to its support. In fact, dur- 
ing his life he gave more to support the church than he had left when he died, 
having always been very active in church work and usually held some official 
position in the church. 

Wesley Grantham and wife were the parents of two children, an equal 
number of sons and daughters; Mary Elizabeth, deceased, was the wife of 
Nathan Hulett, subject of this review. 

The mother of Mrs. Hulett passed away in 1891. She was also an earn- 
est church worker, belonging to the Methodist church, and later in life joined 
the Christian church and tliligently trained her children to follow in the same 
wa}'. 

The death of Wesley Grantham occurred cm May 14, 1903. one day be- 
fore his seventy-eighth birthday. He was a large hearted, charitable, 
hospitable man, who could not turn a deaf ear to the pleas of the suffering 
and needy. 

After his marriage, Mr. Hulett Ijegan farming (in ninety acres of land 
that his brother owned and a year or two later bought out his brother's inter- 
est. It was ten or fifteen years before he purchased more land, when he 
traded forty acres for eighty acres, assuming incumbrances, which he later 
paid. Since then he purchased a twenty acre tract adjoining the eighty 
tract, and added more from time to time until he eventually owned about five 
hundred acres in the southwestern part of Clark township. He has since 
divided a part of this among his sons-in-law, but still retains three hundred 
forty-three and one-half acres. He has been very successful as a general 
farmer and stock raiser. 

Three daughters ha\e been born to our sulijcct and wife, name!)' : E\-a, 
Ella and May. The first named is the wife of John W. Dean, the second is 
the wife of Robert Hicks, and the youngest married Cecil C. Click. They 
all li\e in the southwestern part of Clarke township. A separte sketch of 
each of these gentlemen will be found elsewhere in these jjages. 

Mrs. Hulett passed to her eternal rest on December 10, 1909. As a wife 
she was devoted to all the interests of her husband and was a valuable help- 



1046 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

meet. She was a member of the Christian church and was always fond of 
church work. As a mother she manifested instinctive solicitude for the wel- 
fare of her children, making their interests her interest, and installing into 
their lives an assurance of the inheritance of the life immortal. When she 
realized her end was near she called the family to her bedside and bade them 
farewell admonishing the children to be good to their father, then gently fell 
asleep. Since her death Mr. Hulett has made his home with his children, to 
whom he is always a kind father and anxious to provide for their welfare. 
He is a worthy member of the Christian church, is well known and highly 
esteemed h\- all wiio know him. 



SAMUEL HENRY OTTERMAN. • 

Few men of a past generation in Montgomen- cuunt\- were held in higher 
esteem than the late Samuel Otterman, who, now that life's fitful fever is 
over, is sleeping serenely in the "windowless palaces of rest." His memory 
will long be revered by the vast host of people who knew him and admired 
him, for he was a man in w horn all took a delight owing to his sterling hon- 
est}', his ciiaritable nature and his readiness to help in the furtherance of any 
movement looking to the general upbuilding of the community. He was one 
of our sterling native sons whom we owe so mucli to, for he grew up here 
when the land was just being redeemed from its wilderness fastness, and, 
working long and hard, redeemed, with others, the fertile fields and the fine 
farms which we of today enjoy and which are now so valuable. We can 
never say too much regarding these splendid, brave and courageous pioneers 
and pioneers' sons, many of whom literally took their lives in their hands 
and, not counting the cost, forged ahead to the goal of success. Our subject 
inherited the courage and persistent qualities of his forebears who cast their 
lots in the new country, away from the pleasant hearthstones of their child- 
hood and the advantages of civilization. 

Mr. Otterman was born in Section 22. Clark township, Montgomery 
county, on Alay 10, 1842. He was a son of Lewis and Hettie Otterman, a 
sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He was the fourth child in 
a family of nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity. 

Samuel H. Otterman grew to manhood on his father's farm where he 
assisted with the general work when a boy, and during the wintertime he at- 
tended the district schools and received the usual elementary education of the 
boys of his time. In July, 1870, he married ]Mary Roberts, a daughter of 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, IN.DIANA. IO47 

Larkin and Hannah (Byrani) Roberts. She lived near (ireencastlc, J'vitnani 
county until she was about ten years of age. Her mother had died there while 
she was an infant and little Mary grew up without her loving care. 

A\"hen Mrs. Otterman was ten years old the home was broken up and she 
was brought to live with ]Mr. and Mrs. Adam Keys, near Browns \'alley, not 
far from Parkersburg, remaining there until she was sixteen years of age 
then came to the home of Lewis Otterman where she resided two years tiien 
married Samuel Otterman, one of the sons of Lewis Otterman. Samuel 
l>eing the eldest son he continued to live with his father and mother until 
they died and afterwards remained on the home place, which he operated in 
a most satisfactory manner, keeping it well improved anil reaping abundant 
crops as a result of his good management and energy. 

Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Otterman, namely ; 
Albert, born January 7, 1871 lived on the farm until the death of his father 
and now he lives with his mother in Ladoga ; Hettie married Jefif Whelan, of 
Birmingham, Alabama, and they have three children, Everett, Charles and 
Lucile; Dora married Leaton Dougherty who is now attending veterinary 
college in Chicago, and they have one daughter, Ruth; George, Jr., born 
January 8, 1884, married February 2.2, 1905, Edna Zimmerman, and they 
have three children, Irene, Marie and Eugene, and they live in Ladoga : Allie 
married Lee Starks ; they live on a part of the old Otterman homestead and 
have two sons, A\'alter and Herman. 

Samuel Otterman was a member of the Christian church, of which Mrs. 
Mary Otterman is also a worthy member. Early in life he joined the Foun- 
tain Christian church of w'hich he continued a faithful member until the end 
of his earthly existence. He willingly took up his father's mantle and so 
long as he was able he continued to discharge his duties to the church, and 
every Sunday he could be seen, with his family, on foot or in some conveyance 
making his solemn way to the Lord's house. His last illness was of long 
duration but he bore it with characteristic Christian fortitude, until he was 
called to his reward on October 24, 191 1 at the age of sixty-nine \-ears. 
Physically he was a robust, rugged man, an indulgent father, kind huslKind 
and good neighbor. For more than forty years he and his good wife trod 
peacefully and hamoniously life's rugged pathway together, helping and en- 
couraging each other, and now that he is gone to her has fallen a share of 
the responsibility that was his in rearing the famil\- and upl)uilding the home. 
She now lives in Ladoga with her two sons, Albert and ( ieorgc, and there, as 
in her former communities she has manv warm friends. 



1048 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOHN FRANKLIN ROYALTY. 

History and biography for the most part record the lives of only those 
who have attained military, political or literary distinction or who in any 
other career have passed through extraordinary vicissitudes of fortune. But 
the names of men who have distinguished themselves in their day and gen- 
eration for the possession of those qualities of character which mainly con- 
tribute to the success of private life and to the public stability — of men who, 
without brilliant talents, have been exemplary in all their personal and social 
relations, and enjoyed the esteem, respect and confidence of tliose around them 
- — ought not to be allowed to perish : for all are benefited by the delineation 
of those. traits of character which find scope and exercise in the common 
walks of life. Among the individuals of this class of a past generation in 
Montgomery county was the late John Franklin Royalty, for some time the 
able and popular editor of the IVingafe Neius, who had the interests of his 
town and county at heart, which he sought to promote whenever possible. 
His life history was distinguished by the most substantial qualities of char- 
acter and exhibited a commendable career of private industry, performed 
with moderation and crowned with success, and his memory will long be 
revered by the people of this locality. 

Mr. Royalty was born on November 14, 1872, in Crawfordsville, In- 
diana. He was a son of Andrew Jackson Royalty and Mary (Britton) Roy- 
alty, both parents being natives of Montgomery county, the mother having 
been born in Crawfordsville, and near that city they established their home, 
conducting a fruit farm for years. They were the parents of two children, 
John Franklin, of this review, and Fred W., who lives in Danville, Illinois. 

Mr. Royalty grew up in his native community and received a good edu- 
cation in the common schools. In 1892 he was united in marriage to Lily J. 
Palin, daughter of Henry and Keziah (Boord) Palin. Her father was a 
native of North Carolina, from which state he came to Indiana in an early 
day, locating in Fountain county among the first settlers, and there he de- 
veloped a good farm through his industry and close application and followed 
general farming and stock raising there the rest of his life. His family con- 
sisted of nine children, named as follows: Winfield C. lives in Wingate, 
this county; Mary Ann is deceased; Julia Emma married Dr. Robert Clay- 
pool, of Williamsport ; Emma married Fred Wales, and they live in Eliza- 
beth, New Jersey; Ella May married John McWhinney; Charles C. is de- 




JOHN F. ROYALTY AND FAMILY 



MONTdOMr.RV CDLNTV, INDIANA. I O49 

ceased; Lily J., widow of Mr. Royalty, of lliis nienioir; K. Maude, who lives 
in Indianapolis; and Glee Ernia. who is deceased. 

The union of Mr. Royalty and wife was blessed by the birth of one 
child, Henry Jackson, who lives at home. 

Mr. Royalty was for a number of years prior to his death editor of the 
Wingate Ncivs, which paper he made a very potent factor in this locality. 
He greatly increased its circulation and prestige and made it one of the best 
newspapers of its class in this part of the state. He was a well read and well 
informed man, kept fully abreast of the times and was a man of energy, 
sound judgment and foresight. This paper was started by his father in 1900. 

The death of Mr. Royalty occurred on June 6, 1910, at the age of thirty- 
seven years, w^hen in the very prime of life and when the future seemed to 
promise most. His death was accidental and came as the result of a railroad 
accident at the town of Mellott, Indiana. 

Mr. Royalty w^as not active in public affairs and never held office : how- 
ever, he always did what he could in advancing the interests of his locality. 
Religiously, he belonged to the ]\Iethodist Episcoprd church, and was a man 
of good habits and friendlv manners. 



JOHN W. DF.AX. 



Success as a general farmer has come tn John W. Dean, of ("lark town- 
ship, Montgomery county, partly because he has gi\eu his sole attention to his 
branch of endeavor, ignoring other lines in order to become more proficient 
in the one that he liked best, also partly because he has never held back, wait- 
ing for someone else to perform the tasks which he himself should do. 

Mr. Dean was born in Jackson township. Putnam county. Indiana, on 
June 21, 1869. He is a son of George Matilda ( Epjjerson ) Dean. Ilis 
mother was a native of Putnam county and his father came from Kentucky. 
When John W. Dean was seven years old the family moved to Clark town- 
ship, this countv and there the lad grew to manhood on the home farm on 
which he worked, attending the public schools in the winter time, and lived 
until his marriage, which occurred in 189 1. He chose as a life i)artner Eva 
Hulett, daughter of Xathan Hulett and wife. To this union two children 
have been born. Earl and Beulah. 

Ever since he became of age. Mr. Dean has enga.ged in fanning for him- 
self. He now owns one hundred acres in the southeastern part of Clark 



1050 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

township, in Section 27. where he has a well cared for and productive place. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dean belong to the Christian church in their neighborhood. 
The death of the father, George Dean, occurred on April 14, 1910, and 
the mother is now living in Roachdale. 



JAMES B. ELMORE, POET. 

(The bard of Alamo.) 

In the domain of literature Indiana has gained a place of distinction and 
pre-eminence, being now b)- universal consent, the successor of Massachusetts 
as the literar)-- center of America. No state has produced such a brilliant 
galaxy of stars in the literary firmament as has Indiana. In the long list of 
her native writers we may mention a few such as James Whitcomb Riley, 
Joaquin Miller, Edward Eggleston, Lew Wallace, Booth Tarkington, George 
Ade, David Graham Phillips, Maurice Thompson, Gene Stratton Porter and 
Meredith Nicholson, to say nothing of scores of lesser lights. Alontgomery 
county has had her full share of the glory in literary genius, here having been 
born Meredith Nicholson, and here the great author of Ben-Hur spent prac- 
tically all his life; but it is as the home of statesmen that this county excels. 
To give a comprehensive reason for the first place in literature in the western 
hemisphere being held by the Hoosier state would be indeed cjuite out of the 
C]uestion, whether it has been the result of the meeting of the sterling pioneer 
elements of the East and the West, or a superior system of education, or 
whether there is greater natural inspiration and more effort is being made to 
produce literature here than in other states must be left to conjecture. But 
the state should be proud of its eminence in this respect. Among those who 
have contributed materially, of recent years, locally, at least, to its prestige as 
a literary center, stands James B. Elmore, of Montgomery county, well known 
as "The bard of Alamo," who is a native son of the locality of which this his- 
tory deals, whose productions marked by depth of thought and adroit polish 
have given him a stanch following. It is of course extraneous to the func- 
tions of this publication to enter into manifold details concerning the careers 
of the many representative citizens whose names find a place within its pages 
and in the case at hand it can be hoped to present only a succinct but we hope 
accurate and worthy tribute to this talented son of the far-famed Wabash 
valley countn-, made familiar to the wide world through the tender but 
masterful strokes of Paul Dresser. 



MONTCO.MKRV CorXTV. INDIANA. IO5I 

Mr. I'^linurc was Ixini nn January J^, \^^J. in RipU'v tow uslii]). .Mont- 
gomery CDUiily. Indiana. He is a sun of Mattliias and .Mary ( Willis i i'll- 
more. The father was born in 1809 in Ohio and his death occurred in iXi)2. 
The mother was also a native of Ohio. Matthias Elmore grew to manhood 
in his native locality and there received a meager education, going no farther 
than the "rule of three" in mathematics, but, being a great reader and a man 
of quick perception he became well educated. He took a great deal of inter- 
est in politics, and was a Whig up to the race of Gen. \\'illiam Heriry Har- 
rison for the Presidency. He was a carpenter by trade, and he helped Ijuild 
the first Methodist Episcopal church in Crawfordsville. His chief life work, 
however, was farming. His family consisted of seven children by his first 
wife and six by his second wife. He was three times married but the last 
union was w itlK)Ut issue. His first wife was a cousin of William English, a 
well known politician and capitalist of Indianapolis, of the past generation. 
The second wife was the mother of the subject of this sketch. The third 
wife was known in her maidenhood as X'irginia Kyle. Of the entire family 
of thirteen children, only five are still living. 

James B. Elmore received a common school education, later attending 
high school, but his ambition for a collegiate course was never realized. How- 
ever, he has remained a student all his life, has done a vast amount of miscel- 
laneous reading and is a well educatctl man. He liegan life for himself as a 
school teacher, which he followed for a perioil of twenty years prior to his 
marriage. He gave eminent satisfaction to both ])ui)ils and patrons and his 
services were in great demand. 

On February 14, 1880, Mr. Elmore was united in marriage to Mary .\nn 
Murray, who was born in Missouri, May 23, 1863, and is a daughter of James 
and Mary Ann (Templin) Murray, the father a natixe of Kentucky. 

The union of our subject and wife has resulted in the birth of five chil- 
dren, three of whom are still living, namely: Maud L., and Nora are i^oth 
deceased; Roscoe M., born October i, 1882. married Myrtle Lattimore, and 
he is one of the successful public school teachers of Ri])ley tt)wnship: Grace, 
born on January 17, 1885, married Nathan Droljnger and they live in \'eed- 
ersburg; Albert Murray, born September 20, 1889. married r,ula M. Seits; 
they live in Ripley township, and have two children, a son. named after our 
subject, James Byron, Jr., and a daughter, Margaret .Angeline. 

James B. Elmore is a lover of what the great Methodi.st bishop, William 
A. Quayle, would call "God's glorious outdoors" and. having the love of 
mother nature in "all her visible forms" in him. as do all |xicts, he has spent 



1052 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

his life in the rural districts, starting out on the farm, in\esting, at the time 
of his marriage, the sum of four hundred dollars, his total worldly wealth, 
in thirty acres of land, a part of his present farm. There he li\-ed for some 
time in a log cabm, and farmed and taught school. Finall}', he purchased 
eighty acres more, going in debt for the same ; later he traded that eighty for 
one hundred and sixty acres near home, and this he still owns. Subsequently, 
he purchased eighty acres from his father, from whom he heired another 
eighty, later bought sixty acres south of home and then purchased one hun- 
dred and sixty north of his home farm, and at this writing he is the owner 
of an aggregate of five hundred and forty acres of valuable land, nearly all 
tillable, well tiled, well fenced and otherwise improved in an up-to-date man- 
ner. He has a commodious home and substantial outbuildings and he makes 
a specialty of raising Poland-China hogs and Pole cattle, and he also keeps a 
good grade of medium size horses. Everything about his place denotes sys- 
tem, good management and that a gentleman of industry and taste has the 
management of this valuable farmstead well in hand, and is deserving to rank 
among Montgomery's foremost agriculturists. 

Fraternally, Mr. Elmore is a member of the Knights of Pythias at 
Waynetown, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Alamo, and the 
Woodmen at Crawfordsville. Religiously, he holds membership with the 
Christian church, and politically, he is a Democrat. 

When Mr. Elmore was a boy in school he began writing poetry, which 
soon proved him to be one of nature's gifted children, for even at that early 
age his verse possessed unusual merit and won for him the soubriquet of 
"The Bard of Alamo" which has since clung to him. Some of his best verse 
was written when he was teaching school, one of the most meritorious being 
"The Belle of Alamo," and "The Red Bird." From time to time he con- 
tinued writing as the muse dictated, and eventually gathered his best verse 
into book form, under the title of "Love Among the Mistletoe: and Other 
Poems," which was well received. He continued to write, and two years 
later put out "A Lover in Cuba; and Other Poems." A few years later fol^ 
lowed another volume of verse, "Twenty-five Years in Jackville," and then 
appeared from his facile pen, "A Romance in the Days of the Golden Circle." 
His last volume was "Autumn Roses." They all bore the unmistakable 
stamp of genuine poetic merit, and each succeeding volume broadened its 
author's fame and audience until today his name has not only covered America 
but is known all over the world, much of his verse being especially liked in 
France. His name is frequently seen attached to poems of fine finish and 



MOXTGOMERY COrXTV. INDIAN'. 



1053 



original tiienie in the Xew York. Indianapolis and utlier nietrdpdlitan jdur- 
nals. 

Air. Elmore's services as a lectnrer lias been in considerable demand and 
he has lectured in many colleges and other institutions throughout Indiana, 
being especially well received in Indianapolis. The advancing years seem to 
give him a deeper penetration into nature and the soul as well as rendering 
his verse finer in every respect and we may hope for greater things from him 
in the future. 

"Let our annals be well written 

That it stand a scanning test. 
Those of fame are never hidden: 
They shall live among tlie blessed." 

—J. B. E. 



CORNELIUS LEOX.ARD CANINE. 

The Canine familx' has been among the well known ami energetic in 
Montgomery count}- since the pioneer days, and, being people who lead up- 
right and helpful lives, they ha\e always enjoyed the good will and high 
regard of their neighbors. One of the best remembered was the late Cor- 
nelius Leonard Canine, who spent his long, industrious and commen(lal)le life 
in his native vicinity in the st)Utln\esicrn jiart of the county, where he 
operated a good farm and did what he could toward the general u])buil(ling 
of the locality. 

Mr. Canine was born on the old Canine homestead in Brown town- 
ship, Eebruarv' 22, 1827. He was a son of Ralph and Alargaret Canine, who 
came to this county from Kentucky, arriving in the wilderness here on Janu- 
ary I, 1826, making the overland journey from Shelby county, Kentucky, 
which required some little time owing to rough roads, or no roads at all. 
Ralph Canine was born in Penns}-lvania and was a son of Peter Canine autl 
wife. I'eter Canine was a soldier in the l\e\ olutionary war. The family 
originally came from Hollan<l. Peter Canine bad six sons, ibree of whom 
settled in Montgomery county, one in Howard county, one in lobnson county. 
and one in Ohio. 

Ralph Canine entered go\-ernment land near W'axelaud for himself 
and also for his sons, Peter, William, John and James — three hundred and 
twenty acres for himself and probably one hundred and si.xty acres for each 
son. Afterwards he bought other land in that vicinity. The Union Primi- 



I054 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

tive Baptist church was organized in his house with eight constituent mem- 
bers, on the fourth Sunday in October, 1826. Ever since its organization 
that church has had its regular monthly covenant meeting on the Saturday 
before the fourth Sunday of the month. Ralph Canine was one of the first 
deacons in the church. He was a grand character and did much good among 
the first settlers. He reached the advanced age of ninety-two years. Politi- 
cally, he was a Democrat. 

Cornelius L. Canine grew to manhood on the home farm here and he 
lived w ithin a mile and a half of the home place all his life, engaged success- 
fully in general farming and stock raising. He was a quiet, unassuming, 
home man. He took a great interest in vocal music, and was known far and 
near as a leader in singing, and his services were in frequent demand to lead 
the singing at old settlers' meetings all over this part of the country. He 
was active in Democratic politics, but never sought office. 

Mr. Canine married Keziah Montgomery, daughter of James and Phoebe 
(Fisher) Montgomery. Her parents came here from Shelby county, Ken- 
tucky, in 1832, when she was about five years old, and settled northwest of 
Whitesville, in Union township. The land is still in possession of their 
descendants, being owned by a grandson. Grant Ward. 

The following children were born to Cornelius L. Canine and wife: 
Mary Catherine, and Syh'ia Ann, both deceased. Marion Montgomery Can- 
ine lives in Crawfordsville, and operates a poultry farm there. He is an 
elder in the Primitive Baptist church, his membership being still in the old 
church that was started in his grandfather's house. He joined the church 
when he was seventeen years old, and has been faithful to its teachings ever 
since. He married Celia Jane Russell, of Parke county, and they have three 
sons, William Banks, Charles Russell and Cecil Clare, all married. William 
B. lives near Danville, Illinois. Charles lives near Marshall in Parke county ; 
and Cecil lives in Indianapolis. Edna Lovia Canine, fourth child of ,the 
subject of this sketch, married J. T. Deere, and to them nine children were 
born; the mother died in November, 1893. Anna Canine married Caleb 
Cobb, of Bedford, Indiana. Walter DeBracket Canine lives west of Ladoga, 
where he owns eighty acres of farm land ; he is married and has one daughter. 
Eva is the wife of George W. Harshbarger, of Clark township. William 
Rice Canine died when twenty-four years old. Louise Alice married Dudley 
Myers, and they live at Carmi, Illinois. Cornelius Leonard Canine, Jr., 
lives in Lincoln-, Nebraska. Banks has two daughters, Celia Henson and 
Viola Russell. Charles has a son. Roy Russell. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. IO55 

Celia Jane Russell was born in Parke county, Indiana, near the village 
of Marshall. She is a daughter of William Banks Kussell and Elizabeth 
(Elder) Russell, who came from Kentucky to that county in an early day. 
Banks married Agnes Henson from near Danville, Illinois. Charles married 
Dolly Myers, of Parke county. Cecil married Minnie Mish, of Crawfords- 
ville. 

The death of Cornelius I.. Canine occurred in June, i.S^S. Keziah 
Canine died June ii. 1894. 



I. \V. CRAXE. 



No tiller of the soil in Coal Creek tDwiisliip. .Muntynniery C(junly. is 
more deserving of the success he has achie\ed in his chosen xocation than 
J. W. Crane, of near Wingate, for he has not only worked honestly and per- 
sistently in order to advance himself, but has been a close student of agricul- 
tural methods — the best known to twentieth century husbandmen, fie has 
been quick to make proper use of such as applied to local conditions, and it is 
a satisfaction to look over his fields during the crop seasons and to note their 
fine condition and the thriving crops they are growing, whether one is a 
farmer or not — for who is not pleased with a prosperous rural scene, in all 
its peace, suggestion plenty and rare beauty? He has taken every advantage 
of local conditions and has made a very careful study of the soil, the various 
crops adapted to them, climatic conditions and wliatever should I>e observed 
by the modern agriculturist. 

Mr. Crane was ])orn on January 2^. 1861. in l-'ountain county, Indiana, 
and is a scion of a worthy old family. For a complete history of his parents 
and the Crane family we respectfully direct the reader to the sketch of J. R. 
Crane, appearing on another page of this volume, these gentlemen l)eing 
brothers. 

J. W. Crane, of this review, received a good common school education. 
On September 20, 1891, he married Bertha M. Coffing, who was born in 
Fountain county, this state, on November 8, 1870. She is a daughter of 
Daton and Mary A. (Markis) Coffing. She grew to womanhood in her 
native community and received a good common school deucation. 

J. W. Crane has devoted his life to general fanning and stock raising, 
making a specialty of Poland China hogs, which, owing to their superior 
quality, always find a very ready market when offered for sale. He also 



1056 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

keeps a good grade of milk cows. His farm consists of seventy-nine acres, 
all tillable and under a good state of improvement and cultivation, and it is 
well tiled. Mr. Crane has a neat, substantial home, which he built himself, 
and he is well fixed to enjoy life in every respect. 

Politically, Mr. Crane is a Progressive, and during the recent Presi- 
dential campaign was active in the work of the new movement in his locality. 
Fraternally, he belongs to the Knights of Pythias at Wingate. He takes an 
interest in whatever tends to better the conditions of his township and county. 
Mrs. Crane is a member of the Christian church, and with her husband fre- 
quently attends the same. 



WALTER H. McBEE. 



Nature, in her green mantle, is nowhere more lovely than in that part 
of Montgomery county set aside by survey as Madison township. Cozy 
farm houses nestle in gentle quietude amid green orchards which dot the 
landscape in every direction, presenting a scene of plenty and prosperity, 
though in some parts it has the appearance of newness. This division of the 
county has been settled for many years, and scenes once familiar to the older 
residents are rapidly fading from view. Only too frequently is it the case 
that those who have been reared in such a picturesque locality fail to appre- 
ciate its natural beauties and advantages. But this has not been the case with 
Walter H. McBee, a well known farmer of this vicinity. 

Mr. McBee was born in the above named township and county on May 
18, 1856. He is a son of William Z. and Mary E. (Shobe) McBee. The 
father was born in Grant county. West Virginia, from which country he came 
to Indiana in 1852 and settled in Madison township, Montgomery county, 
having made the journey here on horseback. The mother of our subject was 
born in Ross county, Ohio, and she came to Montgomery county, Indiana, 
with her parents who settled in Madison township as early as 1838. William 
Z. McBee devoted most of his life to farming, but in his old age he left the 
farm and moved to the town of Linden where he was interested in a bank, 
and there his death occurred in 1910 at the advanced age of seventy-nine 
years. His widow is still living in Linden. 

Waher H. McBee grew to manhood on the home farm in Madison town- 
ship and there he assisted with the general work, and he received his educa- 
tion in the common schools, then took up farming and is still active, owning 




WALTER H. McBEE 



iiiluclivc farm of niic Iniiu 


Ireil acres ami 


he makes a 


stock, especially liu-s. 






larried on December _\^ 


1SS4 In Mar; 


V- !•:. Shotts, 


il Xancy (Severs) Shotts. 


Her lather 


was a native 



MONTC.OMKKV COINTV. IXDI.WA. IO57 

a well improved and 
specialty of raising- li 

Mr. Mcl'.ee was 
daughter of Andrew 
of Virf^inia and her mother of Ohio. Andrew Shotts came to Montijomery 
county. Indiana, as early as 1830 and settled in Madison township when the 
country was sparsely settled and little improved. Further mention of the 
Shotts family is found in this volume under the caption of .\rthur R. Shotts. 

Grandfather Severs settled in Walnut township, this county in a very 
early day. 

Eleven children were lK)rn to Andrew and Xancy Shotts, seven of whom 
are still living. 

Seven children were lx)rn to William Z. McL5ee and 
are still living, namely: Walter 11.. of this review ; M;in 
Minnie. Sarah Melinda. Robert !•. is deceased: and Willia 
of the children. 

Walter H. McHee is a Democrat, and he was a member of the ;id\isory 
board for one term, antl was also at one time ai)iJointed superintendent of 
gravel roads. Fraternally, he belongs to the I-"ree and .\ccepted .Masons. 
He attends the New Light Christian church. 

Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. McRee. named as follows: 
Maud, who married Walter Hoss. lives m :\Iadison townshij), this county; 
N^ancv E., Elsie. Isaac C. and Minnie, are all at home. 



fe. six of 


whom 


7... Mary 


Olive, 


T., the yc 


lungest 



J()X.\T1I.\\ XLTT. 

Fame may look to the cla^h of resounding arms for its heroes: instory's 
pages may lie filled with :i record of the deeds of the so-called gre.at wlio have 
deluged the world with blood, destroyed kingdoms, created dynasties and 
left their names as jilague -pots upon civilization's escutcheou : the |)oet may 
embalm in deathless song the short and simple annals of the poor: but there 
have been comparatively few to sound the praise of the brave and sturdy 
pioneer who among the truly great and noble is certainly among the deserving 
of at least a little space on the category of the immortals. To him more than 
to any other is civilizati(jn indebted for the brightest jewel in its diadem, for 
it was he that blazed the way and acted as van guard for the mighty army of 
progress that within the last century has coufpiered Indiana's wilderness and 
(67) 



1058 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

transformed it into one of the fairest antl most enlightened of the American 
commonwealth's domains. One of the pioneer families of ]\IontgomeiT 
county was that represented by our subject, Jonathan Nutt, a venerable agri- 
culturist of Union township, he is one of the few connecting" links between 
the remote days of the first settlers and the present, being a son of an early 
settler, and he has lived to see the count}- de\elop from a wilderness to what 
it is today. 

Jonathan Nutt was born on land enteretl l)y his father in Union town- 
ship, Montgomery county, his birth having occurred on September i, 1829. 
He is a son of Edmund and Elizabeth (Mann) Nutt. Edmund Nutt was born 
in Virginia where he spent his earlier years and from which he migrated to 
Montgomery' county, Indiana, in the early twenties, and entered one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in Union township. This he cleared and de- 
veloped into a good farm. He was a hard worker and a good manager, and 
constantly added to his holdings, until at the time of his death in 1863 he was 
the owner of over two thousand antl two hundred acres, being one of the 
largest land owners in the county and one of its most substantial and l^est 
known citizens. He had de\'otetl his entire life to farming and stock raising, 
which he carried on \'ery extensivel\'. He had a large family, twelve chil- 
dren, only two of whom are living at this writing. Politically, he was a 
Whig, later a Democrat, but he never held office nor aspired to any. He 
married soon after coming to this county to Elizabeth Mann, a daughter of 
an early settler who came from Ohio where she was born. Only three fam- 
ilies were known to be in the county when the Nutts and Manns took up their 
residence here. Members of each did much toward starting the physical, 
moral and intellectual work of civilization here. Mrs. Elizabeth Nutt was 
a woman of fine character, and a coincidence worthy of notice is that in their 
deaths only thirteen days inter\'ened. The two remaining children are J(jna- 
than, of this review: and Sanford Nutt. 

Jonathan Nutt received a very limited education, for he had much hard 
work to do, and in early life had to shift for himself. He began farming 
when young and has continued this line of endeavor to the present time, with 
ever increasing success, having added to his holdings from time to time until 
he now has nearly four hundred acres in Union township, Montgomery- 
county, all valuable, productive and well improved, all under cultivation. 
While he still has general supervision of his place the work on the same is 
done by his son-in-law. He has long kept a good grade of live stock and 
has been very successful in handling the same along with general farming. 



MONTGOMF.RV COl'NTV, INM)I.\.\\\. 1059 

He has a pleasant home and good sul)stantial onllmildinj^s. lie lia> always 
been to the front in matters of interest tn the i^cncral comnnmily. Xow in 
his declining years he can enjoy the i)rt)S])erity which is his ri^hl as the result 
of hard work and frntjal, honest ways. 

roliticaily, Mr. liarchn,!;- is a i<ei)ul)lican, and in religions matters is a 
JMethodist. 

In i860, Mr. Harding was united in marriage In Mary .\nn I'onper, a 
native of Montgomery county, where she was reared and educated, and wliere 
her people were well known in the early days. 

To Mr. and Mr<. Xutl were hnrn two children. Ora. wife of L'linlon 
Snyder: and Flora 1... who is at liome. 

The death of our suhject's wife occurred in i8i)i)- 



GILBERT HOW ELL. 



The following is a hrief sketch of the life of one who. by close attention 
to his chosen profession, has achie\ed marked success in the world's affairs 
and risen to an honored position in the field of fraternal journalism, and is 
well known and highly esteemed among the enter]irising men of the city 
with which his interests are identified. It is a ])lain record, rendered re- 
markable by no strange or mysterious adventure, no womlerful and luck)- 
accident and no tragic situation. Mr. Howell is a man of honest convictions 
and sincere purposes, his upright career and wholesome moral influence 
making him respected by all who have cotne in contact with him, and as 
editor of The Chariot, the official organ of the great Trihe nf Ocn-Hur. his 
influence is most potent, and extends to many thousands ni penple thniu!.;h- 
out the land. 

Gilbert Howell was born in Miami county. ( )hio. July i(). i<S57. He is a 
son of Ephraim R. and Elizabeth (Brelsford) Unwell. The father, Ephraim 
B., was lK)rn in Trenton. Xew Jersey. May 20, 1S16. and was a son of Daniel 
B. and Deborah B. (Boiles) How-ell. Daniel P>. Howell was also born in 
Trenton. Xew Jersey, the year of his birth Iwing 1781. He was thus cradled 
in the \ery storm center of the Revolution. His father was Daxid Howell, a 
nati\e of Wales, w-ho came to the L'nited States about 1730, and settlerl in 
Xew Jersey. He was proprietor of the famous "Black Horse" tavern in 
Trenton. He served in the Revolutionary war, and was one of the se\en 
men detailed to capture General Rahl. commander of the Hessians. He was 



I060 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

a non-commissfoned officer, and ser\'ed tliroughuut tlie war, participating in 
many of the leading engagements. The musket whicli he carried is now in 
possession of the subject of this sketch, who \ery higiily prizes this heir- 
loom of his great-great-grandfather. 

After the close of the Revolutionary war Da\id Howell returned to his 
tavern and continued to conduct the same until his death, when his son, 
Daniel B., succeeded to the management of the noted hostelry until 1820, 
when he m()\'etl to Aliami county, Ohio, and there entered a tract of land 
fnim the g(i\-ernment. He was one of the earl_\- settlers in upper Miami 
valley and worked hard clearing and developing this wild land, but event- 
ually had a productive farm and a comforta])le hcime as a result of his indus- 
try He continued to reside on the farm until his death, which occurred at 
an advanced age. 

Upon the death of Daniel Howell, his son, Ephriam B., father of our 
subject, assumed management of the farm, and followed general agricultural 
pursuits in a very successful manner until his death, on February 15, 1897. 

Deborah Boiles, wife of Daniel B. Howell, mentioned above, was a na- 
tive of England and was the daughter of a Alethodist minister. Eler death 
occurred in New Jerse}- in 181 8, two years prior to the removal of the little 
family to Ohio. 

Elizabeth Brelsford, wife of Ephriam Howell, was a nati\e of Char- 
lottsville, Virginia, and was of one of the early families of the Old Dominion, 
her birth occurring August 5, 1820, She and Ephraim B. Howell were mar- 
ried at Fletcher, Ohio, February 22, 1845. Her death occurred on August 
25, 1891. They were people of sterling honesty, industry and hospitality, and 
were highly respected by the people of their community. 

Gilbert Howell was educated at Fletcher, Ohio; however, his education 
was limited, but this early lack has been more than supplied in later life, 
and by close home stud}- and wide miscellaneous reading he has become a 
well informed man. He began life for himself by teaching school, which he 
followed two years. When nineteen years old he began clerking in the store 
of J. & A. W. Prugh, Piqua, Ohio, where, after a year, he was made mana- 
ger of the store, remaining as such for several years. The next twelve years 
were spent by him on the road for the Favorite Sto\e and Range Company, 
giving his usual high-grade and acceptable service. During that time he was 
elected Secretar}--Treasurer of the Fraternal Publishing Company at Piciua, 
Ohio. This marked his initial step into the printing and publishing business 
which was destined to play a very important role in his later life. In this he 



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MOXTGOMKKV COUNTY, INDIANA. I o6 1 

learned every mechanical jjjiase of tlie husiness, mastered with increditable 
swiftness the ins and outs of the same, then was sent by tiie (Irand Lodf^e of 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen to Cleveland, Ohio, to edit tlie oBi- 
cial paper of that organization, "The Buckeye IVorknian," and he remained 
in that capacity for a period of five years, givin.ij eminent satisfaction to ail 
concerned and j>n)\ed himself lo he hy nature, as well as trainin.L;' well i|nali- 
fied for any posilion of trust and resp(.)nsiljilily in the tield i 
His ability being generall_\- recngnized thniughout tlie country 
resigned his position in Llc\ eland in hecnme editnr of "The Charit 
official organ of the Supreme Tribe of I'.en-Uur. ])ublislied at Cr; 
ville, Indiana, and here he has remained to the present time, with stil 
success than characterized his work in Clexeland. He has done 
brighten the general mechanical appearance uf the publication, 
brought it to its present high order of efficiency, making it rank with 
of its kind in the world. He is not only a business man of keen acu; 
is a forceful, convincing and entertaining w riter. 

He belongs to the x'arious Masonic Orders, including the Knights Tem- 
plar, the Mystic Shrine. Mural Tem])le. at Indianapolis. He also belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias, and the Bene\ olent and ]'rotecti\e Order of I'dks, 
and Patriotic Order Sons of America, and Impro\e(l Order of Red Men. 

He is also a member of several of the fraternal insurance societies, and 
is president of the National Fraternal Press Association, which body was 
organized by him sixteen years ago, and which under his judicious manage- 
ment has become strong and influential. He is also doing a very commenda- 
ble work as president of the Indiana Fraternal Congress. Politically, he is a 
Republican, and in religious matters a Methodist. 

Mr. Howell was married on September 2^. iSjy, to L(»uise .\. llarthan. 
of Selma, .\labama, a lad)- of culture and refinement, who died July 4. iS()i. 
at Picpia, Ohio, her birthplace. To this union were born three children, 
namely: Edith A., wife of Alfred P. McClellan, of Crawfordsville : l.loyd 
B., who is assistant professor in chemistry in Wabash College; ISlanche .\.. 
who married Walter Troemel, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They were all 
well educated and received every advantage. 

Mr. Howell was again married. May 20. i8y6, to Rebecca .\. Snyder, of 
Piqua, Ohio, but to this union no children have been born. 

Personally, Mr. Howell is a pleasant man to meet, genial, obliging and 
a man of never- failing courtesy. 



I062 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



WILLIAM JARVIS. 



Ninety years have dissolved in the mists of time, emhracing the major 
part of the most remarkable century in all the histor\- of the race of man- 
kind, since the honored and venerable subject of this sketch first saw the 
light of day. Heaven has bounteously lengthened out his life until he has 
seen the crowning glory of this, the most wonderful, epoch of all the aeons, 
of time, rewarding him with an unusual span of years as a result of virtuous 
and consistent living in his youth and years of his active manhood, until now, 
in the golden Indian summer of his life, surrounded by comfort and plenty 
as a result of his earlier years of industry and frugality, Mr. Jan'is can take 
a retrospective glance down the corridors of the relentless and irrevocable 
past and feel that his has been an eminently useful, successful and happy life, 
a life which has not been devoid of obstacles and whose rose has held many a 
thorn, but with indomitable courage he pressed onward with his face set in 
determination toward the distant goal which he has so grandly won; a life of 
sunshine and shadow, of victory and defeat, according to the common lot of 
humanity since the world began, but nobly lived and worthily rewarded, as 
such lives always are by the Giver of all good and precious gifts, who has 
given Mr. Jarvis the longest span of years of any of his contemporaries, a 
great gift, indeed, of which he is duly grateful. Although a native of the 
fair Blue Grass state, the major portion of his life has been spent in the 
Wabash Valley country, and he has alwa}'s been deeply interested in what- 
ever tended to promote the prosperity of his chosen locality and to him as 
much as to any other man is the community indebted for the material de- 
velopment for which it has long been noted, and his long residence in Brown 
township has won for him a \ery high place in the confidence and esteem of 
his many acquaintances and friends. He has used his influence for all moral 
and benevolent entei-prises, being a friend and liberal patron of the church, 
which he believes to be the most potential factor for substantial good the 
world has ever known or ever will know ; he has also been an earnest advo- 
cate of the cause of temperance. In short, he has sought to fulfill his duties 
as an honest, public-spirited citizen at all times. . 

William Jarvis, of Waveland, Montgomery county, was born at Cle- 
mentsville, Kentucky, October 21, 1823. He is a son of Reason and Betsey 
(Heath) Jar\'is. The father was a native of the state of Maryland, and his 
death occurred in Kentucky in 1838. he having located in the "dark and 
bloodv ground" countrv in a very early day. The mother of our subject was 



MONTCOMIiRV Ct)r.\TV. INDIANA. K)!)^ 

also a native of Manlaiul. Tlicsc parents iIla otcd their livo to j;cncral I'arni- 
nig, were liard-working, honest, hospital)le people of tlie t^ood old-fashioed 
type. 'I'hey became tlie parents of seven cliildren. all now deceased but 
William, Miliject of this sketch. They were named as f.)llows; Xathan. Joe, 
J.ihn. William. .Martha. Henry and Flemin- 

William Jar\is grew to manhood on the home farm, where he finiiid 
l)lenty of hard work U) do when a boy, bein.g the son of a pioneer and reared 
amid pioneer conditions. He received a verv- limited education in the nld lo,i; 
school house of his community, with its puncheon floor and seats, its wide 
fire-place in one end. and its greased paper window. However, he has been a 
wide reader of newspapers and good books and is a well informed man. 

On June 8, 1858, Mr. Jarvis married Mary V. Switzer, who was born 
in Ohio on October 10, 1840. She was a daughter of Jonathan and Xancy 
(Dooley) Switzer. Her father was bom on May 18, 1808. Mrs. Jarvis re- 
ceived a good common school deucation. 

To our subject and wife one child was born, I'.mm: 
who was born in Parke county, Indiana, April 17, i8()0. 
good common school education and married Edward Olds 
Parke county, and there they still reside: they are the parents 
dren, namely : Vivian, Grace and Mary. 

William Jarvis began life for himself as a farmer when a young man 
and he has devoted his life to general farming and stock raising with a 
greater degree of success than befalls the average farmer. He has worked 
hard, managed well and each year has found him further advanced than the 
preceding. He s])ent two years engaged in the .general merchandise business 
at Placerville, California, having crossed the great plains to the I'acilir coast 
before the days of railroads. After spendin.g two veais there he returned to 
Indiana and resumed farming. He is the owner of nver one thousand acres 
of valuable land, nine hundred and twentv-five of which lie in I'arke countv. 
and eighty-five in Montgomery county. His land is under a high stale of im- 
provement and cultivation, and he has farmed on a large scale and r.iised 
large numbers of live stock of all varieties. He resides in the town of W'ave- 
land. Brown township, where he has a commodious, attractive and modernly 
furnished home, which is known to his many friends as a ])lace of old-time 
hospitality. He is one of the substantial and well-tu-dn men of iliis i)art of 
the county. 

F'olitically. Mr. Jarvis is a Republican, but he has never been much of a 
politician; however, he has takeji an abiding intere-t in tlie affairs of his 



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1064 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to.wnship and county, and he was at one time county commissioner, which 
position he held with credit tn himself and satisfaction to his constituents. 
In religious matters he belongs to the Christian church, and was formerly a 
trustee in the same, and has long been one of its most acti\'e meml^ers. 



SAMUEL A. DYKES. 

Sugar Creek township, Montgomer)' county, is the home of many suc- 
cessful farmers. Among those who have prospered by their energy, perse- 
verance and good management, is Samuel A. Dykes, who owns and operates 
a fine estate, which has been accjuired through his excellent planning and 
characteristic industry. A visitor to his home will see that he has not only 
erected good buildings and kept his farm well supplied with modern ma- 
chinery, but also that he keeps excellent grades of live stock. 

Mr. Dykes was born on October 27,, 1869 in the township and county 
where he still resides, and here he grew to manhood and received a common 
school education. For a sketch of his parents and the Dykes ancestry the 
reader is directed to the life hi.story of J- E. Dykes, appearing in another part 
of this volume. 

Samuel A. Dykes was married on June 7, 1896 to Anna Maguire, who 
was born in Shelby county, Indiana, January 14, 1868. She is a daughter of 
Charles and Harriet (Yearion) Maguire. The father was a native of Ire- 
land, born on November 14, 1835. and he is now living at Darlington, this 
county. The mother of Mrs. Dykes was born on December 16, 1844, in 
Hamilton county, Ohio, and she and Mr. Maguire were married in that state. 
She, too, is still living. These parents are now advanced in age. They are 
well known in this section of the county and are held in high esteem by all. 
We quote the following from the Crazi'fords^'illc Rcz'icii' under date of July 
8, 1910, l^earing the caption, "Celebrate Their Golden Wedding Anniversary 
Today." 

"Today at their beautiful country home near Darlington, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Magtiire are celebrating their golden wedding anniversary and with 
them are their eleven children as well as a numl^er of friends and other rela- 
tives. Mr. and Mrs. Maguire have reached the half century mark of wedded 
bliss, in excellent health and happiness and they are permitted to enjoy an 
event so few persons ever know. 

"Mr. Maguire was born near Fintina. County Tyrone, Ireland, and spent 




SA.MUEL A. UYKES 



MONTCOMERY COl-NTV. INDIANA. I065 

his boyhood there, cominj^ to this country wlien he was alxjiit eijjiiteeii years 
of age. He landed in I'hihuleiphia after a stomiy voyage of six weeks and 
three days. From the Quaker city he went to Pittsburgii and then to Cin- 
cinnati. It was while living in Ohio that he met and wooed Miss Harriet 
Yearion and was married to her fifty years ago today. To them two chil- 
dren were Iwrn in ihe Buckeye slate, and soon afterwards they came to Indi- 
ana. The Maguires settled fust near London, in Shelby county, in the fall 
of 1865, and thev lived there several years, making many warm and Inving 
friends in that sectinn wlm h;i\e come today to assist in the festi\ities of the 
occasion. 

"]\Ir. and Mrs. Maguire ha\e li\ed in their present home man\' years and 
have gathered about them a wide circle of acquaintances who hold their 
friendship lovingly. Mr. Maguire has always I)een a staunch Democrat, 
but he has always been keenly awake to the best interests of his ])arty and has 
been a strong advocate of right principles and party reforms that make for 
better citizenship and better government. He has been a member of ( ilenn 
Lodge No. 149. Independent (Irdcr of Odd Fellows, of Darlington for many 
years and at this time has the hon<ir of holding the highest office within the 
gift of the lodge, that of noble grand. 

"All but one of the eleven children. Mrs. Flla Crowder. who died .March 
23, 1903, live within a few miles of the parental home and all of them are 
here to help in the observing in this rounding out of half a century of beauti- 
ful and inspiring married life. The children are as follows: 

"Mrs. R. M. Little, Darlington; Mrs. S. A. Dykes, Darlington: Mrs. 
Charles Custer. Darlington; Mrs. C. E. I'aust. Chicago; Mrs. Marion Clouser. 
Darlington; Mrs. R. H. Hiatt. Darlington: Mrs. Karl Peterson, Darlington; 
Miss Fairy Maguire, at home; Edward Maguire. Darlington; James .Maguire. 
Clark's Hill; and Stewart Maguire, Colfax. 

"Handsome invitations to the celebration were sent out to many friends 
and relatives and many guests will be entertained at the Maguire home today. 
The hours will be from lo to 4 o'clock.'" 

Samuel A. Dykes and wife have one adopted child, Irma C, born on 
July 5. 1902. the daughter of J. E. Dykes and Estelle (Ollinger) Dykes, the 
latter the eldest daughter of Dr. Ollinger of Newmarket. She is attending 

school. 

Mr. Dykes has always followed fanning in Sugar Creek townshij). He 
owns one hundred and sixty acres, all tillable and well improved, with the 
exception of twenty acres. He is living east of his farm about a mile. 



I066 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Fraternally, Mr. Dykes belongs to the Masonic Order at Colfax, and the 
Improved Order of Odd Fellows at Darlington; religiously he is a member 
of the Potato Creek Methodist church, of which he was a steward for eight 
or nine years. Politically, he is a Republican, and he served his township as 
constable, also justice of the peace for several years, giving eminent satisfac- 
tion to all concerned. 



WILLIAM DAMDSOX MYERS. 

It cannot be other than interesting to note in this series of personal 
sketches appearing in this volume the varying conditions that have com- 
passed those whose careers are outlined, and the effort has been made in 
each case to throw well-focused light onto tiie individuality and to bring 
into proper perspective the scheme of each respective character. Each man 
who strives to fulfill his part in connection with human life and human acti- 
vity is deserving of recognition, whatever may or have been the field of his 
endeavor, and it is the function of works of this nature to perpetuate for 
future generations an authentic record concerning those represented in its 
pages, and the value of such publications is certain to be cumulative for all 
time to come, showing forth the individual and specific accomplishments of 
which generic history is ever engendered. The career of William Davidson 
Myers, the present efficient and popular superintendent of the county farm 
of Montgomerv county, has been characterized by hard work and conscien- 
tious endeavor, and he owes his rise to no train of fortunate incidents of for- 
tuitous circumstances. It was the reward of application of mental qualifica- 
tions of a high order to the affairs of business, the combining with keen 
perceptions mental activity that has enabled him to grasp the opportunities 
that presented themselves. This he has done with success, and, what is 
more important, with honor. His integrity has ever been unassailable, his 
honor unimpeachable, and he stands high with all who know him. 

Mr. Myers was born in Monroe county, Indiana, August 13. 1858, and 
is a son of Jacob and Anna Myers. The father was a native of Tennessee 
and he came to Indiana with his parents in the early thirties, and spent the 
rest of his life on a farm in Monroe county, becoming well known among 
the pioneers there, and well established as a result of his life of hard work 
as a general farmer and stock man. His wife was a native of Virginia. 

William D. Myers grew to manhood on the home farm, and there as- 
sisted with the general work when a boy. He took naturally to husbandry 



MONTCOMT-RV (.OrNTV, IXOIAXA. 1 CM)/ 

and had a valuable instructur in his father, hence it is no wonder liiai lie is 
eminently successful with the superintendency of the county farm, lie had 
little chance to obtain an education, but made the best use possible w ilh w hat 
he did ha\e. Jlc farmed successfully in Mounie cdunty until March J5. 
1889. when he renn)\ed to Monts^omery ccmnty, where he continued i^eneral 
agricultural pursuits. tJu June S, Kjog. he was appointed sui)crinteudeul of 
the count}- farm, by the county commissioners, and soon thereafter, on Sep- 
tember I, 1909, took charge of the same, which position he has since held in 
a manner that reflects much credit to himself and to the eminent satisfaction 
of the commissioners and all concerned, keeping the place well improved and 
under a high state of cultivation, making it produce abundant crops and he 
has built up the soil, so that it has retained its fertility. He seems to be, in 
every respect, the right man in the right place. One June 7, 1911, he was 
appointed for a second term of two years, with a substantial increase in 
salary. 

Mr. .Myers is a member of the Independent Order of Odd I'^llows, is 
past grand of the Subordinate of Crawfordsxille Lodge No. 223; he is also 
a past chief patriarch of Bethesda Encampment No. 15, Independent (^rder 
of Odd Fellows. He has attended the So\erin Grand Lodge. Politically, 
he is a Democrat. 

Mr. Myers was married on September 27, 1879, to Sarah J. Pittman, a 
native of Brown county, Indiana. To this union five childreiji have been 
born, namely : Mary Ann, wife of Frank Steele, of Montgomery county ; 
Elmer L'. is deceased; Bertha Sophia is the wife of Bert Knight, li\es in 
Montgomery county: Junie Mabel is the wife of Belie \'anHook, also of this 
county; and Merle H., who is attending liigh school, this being his second 
vear. 



CECIL C. CLICK. 



One of the young farmers of Clark township. Montgomery county wh< 
gixes unusual promise is Cecil C. Click. He combines enterprise with souni 
judgment and persistent effort so that a large degree of success is alteudint. 
his efforts from year to year as a tiller of the soil. 

Mr. Click was born in this township and county. September -'4. i88_> 
He is a son of Jo.seph and Jessie (Owens) Click. The father was born ir 
\'irginia and when eight years old came west with his jjarents who settlet 
in Putnam county, later moving across the line into Montgoniery comity an( 



I068 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

established the future home of the family in Clark township, and here these 
parents developed a good farm through their industry and spent the rest of 
their lives, and on that place their son Joseph, grew to manhood, assisted with 
the general farm work, and in this district he received a common school edu- 
cation, and there married Jessie Owens, who was lx)rn in Clark township, 
and was a daughter of Juhn Owens and wife. Mr. O'wens ran a threshing- 
machine, also a saw mill and later in life followed farming. He moved into 
Ladoga about 1905 where he now resides in a pleasant home, living a life 
of quiet. 

Cecil C. Click grew to manhood in Clark township and there did the 
usual work of a farm l:)oy, and in the winter months attended comon schools. 
On February 6, 1902, he married May Hulett, daughter of Xathan Hulett. 

After his marriage, Mr. Click began farming for himself. He has a 
neat little farm of sixty acres in section 2J. Clark township, on which he is 
getting a good start as a general farmer. He and his wife are memljers of 
the Christian church. 



THOMAS W. GRAY. 



Farming is a delight to such men as Thomas \V. Gra_\\ of Sugar Creek 
township, Montgomery county, for he never goes about his work in an 
apathetic way and half-heartedl}-, but on the contrary is always very much in 
earnest and never lacks enthusiasm, so his tasks therefore seem lighter than 
they otherwise would and he gets better results than others who seem to have 
formed a distaste for their vocation. He makes it a point to keep his fields 
clear of weeds, sprouts, and rocks, his fences and buildings carefully repaired 
and everything in ship shape order, and we are glad to give him a conspicu- 
ous place in the list of present day progressive tillers of the soil in this county. 

Mr. Gray was born on February 23, i860, in Sugar Creek township, this 
county. He is a son of Thomas and Phoebe (Peterson) Gray. The father 
and mother were natives of Ohio, the birth of the former having occurred in 
1818, and died in 1868. The mother of our subject was born in 1826 and her 
death occurred in September, 1876. They de\'Oted their lives to general 
fanning, and were the parents of ten children, fi\'e of whom are living, 
namely: . Robert F., Thomas W'., James B., Martin B., and Perry G. 

Thomas W. Gray grew to manhood on the farm and he did his share of 
the general work about the place. He received his education in the common 
schools. On December 23, 1884, he was married to Vena Mahoy, who was 



.MIIXTCdMKUV ((ILNTV, INDIANA. 1069 

born December 27. i8(u in tliis county. She is a 'lauj^lUcr of deori^'e I.vdia 
Daughert}- Malmy. 1 lere she grew to wonianlioud and iecei\ed a ciminiDn 
school education. 

One child was born to our subject and wife, Zola, who died in iHi)i). In 
1900 our subject took a child, Lois, to raise when she was but a tew months 
old. She is now attending school. 

Mr. Gray has devoted his life to farming and has met with a large 
measure of success, and he has raised cattle, including a few short horns. 
He has a fine farm of tliree hundred and twenty acres, all tillable but about 
twenty acres, which is in gro\es and good pasture and some timber. The 
place is fairly well tiled and otherwise well improved, and a good set of build- 
ings is to Ije seen on the land. He has made these improvements himself and 
has one of the best farms in the northeastern part of the county. 

Politically, he is a Republican and elected a meml>er of the advisory 
board in 1910 and he has held the office to the present time, and has been very 
successful in discharging the duties of the ])lace in a manner that has won the 
high esteem and trust of all concerned. He is a man who, while laboring for 
his own advancement delights to see the condition of his neighbors improve 
and the general upbuilding of the county. 



JOHN O. ROSEB.\UM. 

Montgomery county is fortunate in having within her borders a large 
number of professional men of a high order, among whom consistently ap- 
pears the name of John O. Rosebaum, one of the \ounger leaders of the bar, 
who maintains an office in the town of Waveland, in connection with his ex- 
tensive business life, fire and accident insurance, and in whicii ])art ot the 
county he is a leader in political affairs. He is widel\ known throughout 
this section and is rapidly forging to tlie front, being a man of energy, 
strong mental, honorable impulses and a ])leasant ])ersouality. lie enjoys 
the good will and respect of all who know Inm and we ])re(hct a bright future 
in his special fields of endea\dr. 

Mr. Rosebaum was born on June 2. 1S74. in I'.oone county, Imliana, 
and he is a son of B. F. and Sarah E. Osborne) Rosebaum. 'I lie lather 
was born on March 9. 1833, in Ohio, in which state he grew to manboo<l and 
received his educational training, and from there he remo\ed to Indiana 
after his marriage. The mother oi our subject was also a native of Ohio, 



1070 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

her birth having occurred there on February fi, 1842, and there he grew to 
womanhood and attended the common schools in her community. Her death 
occurred on March 13, 1912, in Waveland, Indiana. B. F. Rosebaum is still 
living, making his home at Waveland, being now advanced in years. He 
devoted his active life to agricultural pursuits and stock raising and was 
successful beyond the average tiller of the soil. He has always been known 
as a man of great enterprise, neighborly, public spirited and scrupulous hon- 
esty. He is well known over the county. 

Eight children were born to B. F. and Sarah E. Rosebaum, namely : 
Nora and Joseph are both deceased ; Hattie, who married V. E. Heart, is 
living in Chicago ; William C. lives in Cleveland, Ohio ; Albert is deceased ; 
John O., of this review; Franklin L. is married and lives in Detroit. Michi- 
gan ; Homer G. is married and lives in Chicago. 

John O. Rosebaum grew to manhood on the home farm and there as- 
sisted with the general work. He received a good common school education, 
later spending three years in Wabash College at Crawfordsville, then, having 
determined upon a legal career he entered the Indiana Law School, from 
which he w^as graduated in the year 1898, having made an excellent record in 
that institution. He was admitted to the Montgomery^ County Bar in 1897, 
and on March i8th of that year he was united in marriage to Laila D. Acker, 
who was born on February 21, 1878, in Parke county, Indiana, and from 
there she removed to Montgomery county with her parents when a child, the 
family locating in the vicinity of Waveland. where she grew to womanhood 
and received her education. She is a daughter of L. E. and Serena (Van- 
diver) Acker, a well known and highly respected family, who became well 
established here through their industiT. 

Seven children have been born to J\Ir. and Mrs. Rosebaum, namely: 
Dwight, Lois S., Ruth E., Edith L., Loren Lucille; John Franklin, and 
Maxine Frances. 

John O. Rosebaum began life for himself by teaching school in his native 
county, which he followed for a period of three years with success, but he had 
a natural bent for the law- and abandoned the school room for Blackstone and 
Kent. He began the practice of his profession in Waveland and here he has 
remained to the present time, building up meanwhile a very satisfactory and 
constantly growing clientele, figuring prominently in the local courts and he 
has met with pronounced success. In connection with his large legal practice 
he does an excellent business in life, fire and accident insurance, representing 
a number of the best companies in the United States. He is kept vers- busy 



MONTGOMliKY COLNTV. !> 



IO7I 



attending to his manifold duties, lie has acn,n,uh.u-d valuahh- |.r„ia-rly in 
Wavcland. inckuling a substantial o./y hmuc and an aiiractnc rental pn.,,- 

""'■Vnuernallv. Mr. Rosehaum is a ihirty-secnd .le^vee Ma-nn. helonging 
to the order at Indianapolis, and he is prominent in the work ot the same. 
He had the honor of serving as Master for two years, and is Past Master (,t 
Waveland Lodge No. 300. He is also Past Chancellor of Rathbone Lodge. 
Kni-hts of Pythias. Keeper of Records and Seals of the Knights ot Pytlnas. 
and'secretarv of Waveland Lodge. No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons. 
Religiouslv. he is a Republican, and has long been actn e ,n the ranks, bemg a 
power in local affairs of his party, and doing much l^r Us success. In i.jofi 
he was a candidate for state senator. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rosebaum were in the well-rememhered hre of the Iro- 
quois theater in Chicago in 1903 and were very lucky to escaj-e unmjured 



ARTHUR R. SIIOTTS. 

Ouh- too frequently is it the case that people do not see beyond the nar- 
row limits of their own surroundings, and items of public and private mterest 
are allowed to dnft mto the channel of the lorg,.tleu past. Manv unportant 
facts connected whh the lives of the early settlers nf Monlg.m.ery county 
are irrevocably lost, but a few have been found by careful research and will 
be appropriately mentioned in this and other sketches in this volume. One 
of the actors in this early history and development of this section of the 
Hoosier state was the honored father of the gentleman whose name intro- 
duces this paragraph, and from the early day in which he took up his resi- 
dence here to the present time the name ShoUs has been well knoun and 
highlv respected. 

\rthur R. Shotts was born in Madison township. Montgomery county. 
Septeml^r 22. 1867. He is a son of An.lrew and Nancy D. (Severs) Shotts. 
The father was a native of Virginia ami the mother was born in Ohio. The 
father's birth occurred on March 23. .SiO. and he died on March 9. 1878. 
In earlv life he came to Montgomery county, about 1828. locating on a farm 
on which he spent the rest of his life; however, he at first lived near Hams- 
burg living for a time on the old William Henry Harrison farm. His fam- 
ily consisted of eleven children, named as follows: John H. is deceased; 
Orin \ ■ Samuel U. is deceased; Isaac P., Ira A., Ernest W., Mary E., 



1072 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

James X"., and William A. are both deceased; Andrew H., and Arthur R., 
subject of this sketch. 

Our subject grew to manhood on the home farm and there worked hard 
when a boy. He received his early education in the common schools, after 
which he took up farming and is still actively engaged in general and mixed 
farming and stock raising, and has been very successful, making a specialty 
of short-horn cattle and Duroc- Jersey hogs. 

Air. Shotts married, on January 2^, 1891, Jane Gushma, daughter of 
John and Caroline Gushma, her parents being early settlers of Tippecanoe 
county. 

Mr. Shotts has no children, but he is rearing a little girl. Politically, 
he is a Democrat, and fraternally, belongs to the Modern ^\"oodmen of 
America at Linden. 

Our subject's father had the hrst fenced farm in Madison township. 
Grandfather, Henry Shotts, who married Lemina Garland, was born in Vir- 
ginia, and there spent most of his earlier life, finally moving to Indiana in the 
twenties, and he died in Montgomery county. 



MILTON H. STUCKEY. 

The history of IMontgomery county reveals the handiwork of many a 
great and noble soul who wrought heroically and unselfishly. Her smiling 
fields and splendid homes, her high grade institutions, her happy, prospering 
people, speak volumes of someone's steadfastness of purpose, of someone's 
strength of arm, courage of heart, activity of brain, of someone's sacrifice. 
But time, the grim obliterator, before whose destroying fingers even the stub- 
born granite must, in the end succumb, is ever at his work of disintegration. 
Beneath his blighting touch even memory fails, and too often a life of glorious 
achievement is forgotten in a day. "Lest we forget" then, this tribute to the 
late Milton H. Stuckey, for many decades one of the best known agricul- 
turists of Sugar Creek township is penned. A son of a pioneer, he himself 
grew up amid pioneer environment and here he was content to spend his life 
and he took much interest in the general upbuilding of the community. It is 
the desire of the biographer as it must be of all who knew him, that his deeds 
and his character be recorded for the benefit of those who follow after. By 
no means rich, as mere worldly possessions are, he was rich in those char- 



.•T(;(>Ml■;u^• a 



'073 



acteristics that go to make tlie loyal, puhlic-sijirilcd citizen ami h. nKirccl man 
of affairs. 

Mr. Stuckey was horn I'"el)riiary i(). 1S43 '" Monlgomcrv lounlv. Indi- 
ana. He was a .son of .\braham and Eliza (Powers) Stuckey. The lather 
was horn in I'ennsylvania. and his death occurred in Warren county, Indiana. 
The mother was born in Ohio. They spent their li\cs on a farm and came 
to this county when it was just being redeemed from the w ilderness and here 
they established the permanent home of the family which ci;)nsiste(l of seven 
children, all now deceased. 

Milton H. Stuckey grew to manhood on the home farm in Sugar Creek 
township, and there he worked hard when a boy. louring the winter months 
he attended the district schools. Early in life he turned his attention to 
farming and stock raising, which he continued to follow with satisfactory 
results all along the line. 

On July 12, 1866, :\lr. Stuckey married :\Iary E. Smith, who was born 
in ^fontgomery county, Indiana, on March 21, 1844. She is a daughter of 
Henry and Nancy (Goodhart) Smith, both natives of Ohio, the father born 
in 1809, and died on January 4, 1855 ; the mother was born in 181 5, and died 
August 6, 1910. They came to this county in an early day, and here became 
successful farmers and spent the rest of their lives. 

Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Stuckey, all li\ ing and named 
as follows: Mrs. Alice \^'. Cook; Mrs. Emma Hampt-on : Mrs. Elanora 
Wall: William P..: Wallace: :Mrs. Melis.sa Johnson; ]\Irs. Julia Harris; Mrs. 
Mary D. Crow; Warner L., born September 17, 1885 on the old home place 
in this count)-, on which farm he still lives, received a common school educa- 
tion, and on September 11. 191 1 he married Mary E. Blake. She was born 
in Grant county, Indiana, January 2^. 1893, and is a daughter of Charles and 
Sarah B. (Evans) Blake. Warner L. Stuckey and wife have one child. 
Charles Arthur, born August 26, 191 2. Wesley O. is the youngest child of 
the subject of this memoir. 

The wife of our subject has lived on the present farm since .\pril, 1S67. 
The place consists of one hundred and ninety acres, of valuable land, all till- 
able but twenty acres. It was placed under a good state of improxement by 
Mr. Stuckey, who was a hard worker and a good manager. The twenty 
acres mentioned is in pasture and. all in all. the farm is a most desirable one. 
Politically, Mr. Stuckey was a Republican, but he was not much of a [tublic 
man, remaining quietly on his farm until death summoned him fmm his 
labors on Mav 3. 1910. at the age of nearly sixty-five years. 
C68) ' 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



WILLIAM WINTER WASHBURN. 



One of the successful and well known business men of Crawfordsville 
and one of her worthiest native sons is William Winter Washburn, the scion 
of a sterling old family that figured more or less prominently in the early- 
day affairs of the locality. He is a man who has succeeded in the \arious 
lines of endeavor which have claimed his attention because he has looked 
carefully to details, has exercised sound judgment and been uniformly fair 
in his dealings with his fellow men, consequently he has ever enjoyed their 
implicit confidence and good will and he is in every way deserving of the 
position he has attained as a citizen of Montgomery county. He is vice- 
president and director of the Citizens National Bank of Crawfordsville. 

Mr. Washburn was born near New Richmond, Montgomery county, 
Indiana, January i, 1864. He is a .^on of Cieorge W. and Louise J. (Whet- 
stone) Washburn, both now tleceased, the father's death having occurred at 
New Richmond in 1905. the mother having preceiled him to the grave in 
1900. 

\\illiam W. Washburn recei\ed a good common school education, later 
taking a course in Wabash College, where he made a good record. After 
leaving school he traveled for some time, then took a position in the Corn 
Exchange Bank in New Richmond, as vice-president, afterwards becoming 
president of that institution. He was one of the organizers of that bank, 
and its growth and success were due for the most part to his able manage- 
ment and wise foresight and under his direction it became one of the sound 
and popular institutions of this section of the Wabash \-alley. He remained 
with that institution until 1906, when, seeking a larger field for the exercise 
of his business talent, he remo\'ed to Crawfordsville, and became \'ice-presi- 
dent and director of the Citizens National Bank, which position he has con- 
tinued to hold to the present time to the eminent satisfaction of all con- 
cerned, and he is universally recognized as one of the substantial and in- 
fluential men in financial circles in Montgomery county. He is also engaged 
in the brokerage business, with offices in the Crawford Hotel, and enjoys an 
extensive patronage in this field of endeavor. 

Politically, Mr. Washburn is a Democrat, and while he has never sought 
political preferment, he has shown himself to be deeply interested in the 
welfare of his county. Fraternally, he is a thirty-second degree Mason, is a 
Knight Templar, and belongs to the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine, Murat Temple at Indianapolis. He is also a member of the 



MONTGOMERY COVNTV. IN'DIANA. ' "/ .1 

Benevolent and Protective Order oi l.'.lks. and ho belongs tr, tbe l>ln Delta 
Theta, a college fraternity. 

Mr Washburn was married on September 3, i8S4. t" -^l:^')' '-".i^i^-. "i 
Crawfordsville, where she was born, reared an<l educated, an<l uliere lu-r 
familv has long been well known and highly esteemed. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Washburn has been graced by tiie bntl, .>! 
three children, namely: Gould Engle. teller in the Citizens Xat.onal l>.ank at 
CrawfordsviUe; George Bennet is a freshman in W abasli College; \oim 
Beard is a freshman in the higli school at Lrawtordsvilic. 



GRANT COOK. 

The old Buckeye state has sent, perhaps, mure enterprising settlers into 
Montgomery county, Indiana, than any other state, w.th Kentucky a close 
second, and thus we owe that state a great debt of grat.tude. tor the n,en and 
women who have come fron^ within her b„r.lers have been emp>re Innlders 
and have plunged bravely mto the work of redeemn,g the wdderness tart- 
nesses of the fair Wabash country unt,l today th.s ,s one ot the leadu^ agr,- 
cultural sections of the Middle ^\•est. The Oh.oans have been reck ned 
courageous, indomitable workers, ne^•er haltmg at any barrier no matter ho v 
imposing or sinister, and. not only that but they have been, as a rule, people 
of law-abiding and high moral n.pulses, glad to contribute m any wa> to the 
furtherance of civilization m the new countries where they settlecl not bemg 
contented merelv to make a livmg for themselves and families. Such people 
are always welcome in any community, for reasons too apparen to need 
dwelling on here. One of this number who is deserving of special mention 
in thes; pages is Grant Gook, successful farmer of Sugar Creek township. 

Mr Cook was born at Clermont, Ohio, September 21, 1864. He is a son 
of William Henrv and Xancy ( XX'yatt ) Cook. The father was born o,. 
Tanuarv 17 18^3, in Ohio, and tliere also the mother was born. September 7. 
18^^ 'Thev grew to maturitv in their native state, received common .school 
edu;:ations and there were married and spent the earlier part of the mar- 
ried lives, finallv removing to Montgomery county. Indiana, where they be- 
cause well established through their industry. The father has a ways l>een a 
farmer and he is still living in this county. His wife died DecemW , ..1901^ 
Ten children, nine of whom are still living, were born to William Henry 
Cook and wife, namely: Edward R. John Q. is deceased: Wilham T.. Eu- 



10/6 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

gene J., Grant W., of this sketch; Everet, Hattie. Ellen, George H. and 
Mattie. 

Grant Cook grew to manhood on the home farm and there he worked 
hard when a boy, assisting his father with the general duties during the crop 
seasons, and in the winter months he attended the common schools in his 
district. 

On December ii, 1891, he married Clara Marsh. She was born on 
January 26, 1871, in Montgomery county, Indiana, and is a daughter of 
John F. and Julia (Peterson) Marsh. The father was born in the state of 
Ohio, April 13, 1845. The mother was torn in Montgomery county, on 
March 2, 1849, ^"^ her death occurred on July 28, 1909. 

Eight children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Cook, seven of whom 
are still living, namely: Perry A., Harry is deceased; Mabel, Roy and Ray- 
mond are twins; Myrl, Florence and Martha. 

Politically, Mr. Cook is a Republican, but he has never been very active 
in public affairs, preferring to devote his attention to his home and his fami. 
He has never followed any line of work other than general farming and stock 
raising. He owns one hundred and two acres, all tillable with the exception of 
about ten acres. It is well tiled, well fenced and otherwise well improved, 
and he has a good, convenient dwelling which he built himself. He always 
keeps a good grade of live stock. 



WILLIAM H. MARTIN. 

To attain a worthy citizenship by a life that is always honored and re- 
spected even from childhood deserx-es more than mere mention. It is no 
easy task to resist the temptations of youth and early manhood and plant a 
character in the minds and hearts of associates that will remain an unstained 
figure for all time. One may take his place in public life through some vigor- 
ous stroke of public policy, and even remain in the hearts of friends and 
neighbors, but to take such a position by dint of the practice of an upright 
life and without a craving for exaltation and popularity, is worthy the high- 
est praise and commendation. The late ^Villiam H. Martin, one of the 
sturdy citizens of Scott township, Montgomery county, Indiana, who was well 
and favorably known throughout this community, was a man respected and 
honored, not because of the vigorous training of his special talents, but be- 
cause of his daily life, which was a record of real, true manhood. Strong 



MONTGOilF.RV COUXTV, INDIANA. IO77 

and forceful in his relations with liis iVllou imn. \k- .i;aiiu'il tho ^mxl will and 
commendation of his associates and tliu ,i;vniTal public, omt retaining;- iiis 
reputation among men for integrity and high character, and never losing that 
dignity which is the birthright of a gentleman. He lived and labored to 
worthy ends and as one of the sterling citizens and representatixc men of 
his community during past years, his nuMiKir}- merits a tril)ute of honur cm tlio 
pages of history. 

William II. Martin was bdrn in Scott township. ^Montgomery county. 
Indiana, on Julv 2(). 1840. and he was the son of janics (irccn Martin ami 
wife, who are referred to at length in the sketcli of 1". A. .Martin, elsewhere in 
this work, and therefore need not be mentioned fully here. The subject's 
early bo\-hood was spent in Scott township, where his father followed farm- 
ing and also operated a saw-mill. During his youth the family removed to 
Warren county, Indiana, where they remained until the death of the parents, 
while the subject was a young man. Mr. Martin then spent about two 
years with a brother in Boone county, this state, at the end of which time he 
returned to Scott township, this county, and for two years was employed as a 
farm hand by William T. Servies. whom he had known from boyhood. This 
was a fortunate engagement for the sul)ject. for he also gained the greatest 
boon that can bless a man. namel}-. a good wife, in the person of Mary A. 
Servies, daughter of his employer and to whom he was married on Oecemljer 
30, 1875. She was born and reared in Scott townshi]) and the two had 
been acquaintances from childhood. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin moved to the northwest quarter of section 9, where he had bought 
eighty acres of good land, and they remained in this home as long as Mr. 
Martin lived. He engaged in general farming, in which he was successful 
and as he prospered he bought more land until he l)ecame the owner of one 
hundred and sixty acres of as good land as the township afforded. He was 
energetic and industrious, systematic in his methods, and a good manager in 
his business affairs, so that he was numlx^red among the enterprising and sub- 
stantial farmers of his community. 

In his political belief, Mr. Martin was a Democrat and gave stanch 
support to that party, though he never was a seeker after the honors or 
emoluments of public office. Religiously, he was an earnest and faithful 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he was a steward for 
many years and a trustee for a time. Fraternally, he was affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias, in which he had passed through all the chairs of the 
local lodge, fie was a man of clean habits, uprigh.t life and honest motives. 



1078 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and devoted himself to the interests of his family, church and community. 
He was devoted to his home and family and to his children he gave every 
educational advantage possible. Mr. Martin's death occurred .on February 
24, 1907. in the fifty-eighth year of his age, his death being generally con- 
sidered a distinct loss to the entire community, while to those who knew him 
best there came a deep sense of personal bereavement. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Martin were born the following children : John T. 
died at the age of seventeen years. Wallace B., who lives near Linnsburg, 
followed farming up to 1912, but is now working at the carpenter trade; he 
married Nannie Miller and they have three sons, Wendell, Chester and Ken- 
neth. Charles died in July, 1903, at the age of nineteen years. Maud is 
the wife of David Douglass, a farmer in the northern part of Scott township, 
this county. James William, who lives on a farm three miles east of Ladoga, 
married Fern Corn, the daughter of Asa Corn, and the}- have three sons, 
^\'illiam, Russell and Rol^ert. Har\ey died in A])ril, 1910, when twenty- 
two years old. Eva Lou is the wife of Harley Spencer, who is freight agent 
for an interurlian line at Lafayette. Claude, who lives on the home farm 
with his mother, was married, in .August, 191 2, to Ethel Delano, daughter of 
Nathan S. Delano. 

Mrs. Martin still manages the home place, keeping everything in good 
repair and not allowing the productive value of the land to run down. She 
is a woman of many graces of head and heart that have commended her to 
the friendship and esteem of all who know her. She is kind and considerate 
of the needs of others, ever desiring the welfare and comfort of those about 
her rather than her own pleasure. 



CHARLES HICKS. 



It is gratifying to see the younger generation of farmers of Montgomery 
county trying to improve the methods which their grandfathers employed in 
tilling the soil, not that the latter were not all right in their day; but condi- 
tions have changed and consequently a change had to be made in agricultural 
methods in order to ge the maximum results from the minimum expenditure 
of labor. It is not necessary here to enumerate these changes, for they are 
too apparent — the vast transformation from the country with its far-stretch- 
ing and wild forests, the new soil and different climatic conditions found by 
the pioneers to those found today. One of the most scientific of these younger 



)f our \\urtlii(.-sl ami hcsl kii 


own old t"am 


ir industry and clean Ii\ in.;; 


he has sou,L;h 


vu.sliip and cminty nn l'\-l)ni 


lary 17. 1S75 


a l)n)thcr .if .Martin Hicks, 


whose sketcl 


tlie IJicks ancestry. 




(h1 (in llic home farm. \\h 


ere he helpei 


and lie received a i^ood ci 


imnion scho,i 


. he marrietl Lettie l)uek\\c 


irth, dau.^hte' 


uckwurth. She was horn 


in llendrick 



MOXTGOMEIiV COUNTV, IiN|)I.\\.\. I O79 

tillers of the soil is a scion of one i 
ilies, whose good reputation hoth fo 
to keep untarnished. 

Mr. Hicks was born in this to\ 
near where he now resides. He is 
on another page of this work gixes 

Charles Hicks grew to maniiood on the home farm, where he helped 
with the general work when a hoy. and he received a good common school 
education. On Xo\eniber _'4. 1897. 
of James J. and Mary (Mark) Due 
county, this state, near North Salem. Her father was from I'.ath county, 
Kentucky, and came to Indiana with his mother, who was a widow w ith sev- 
eral children. The family estahlished a comfortable home near North Salem, 
where James J. Duckworth spent the rest of his life engaged in general 
fanning. His death occurred in North Salem on January :;. i(;ii. at the 
age of se\'enty-six years, eight months and fifteen days. He outlived his 
wife a numljer of decades, she having passed away when .Mrs. Hicks was a 
small child. When Mrs. Hicks was about five years old her father moved 
into North Salem and there she li\'ed until her marriage and attended the 
schools there, passing through the high school. 

When Charles Hicks was twenty-one years old he began farming for 
himself. Up to that time he had farmed for his widowed mother. I'pon 
reaching his majority he began tending some land of his own, but continued 
to reside with his mother until his marriage, after which he moved to a farm 
he owned a miale north of where he now lives. Seven years later, having in the 
meanwhile gotten an excellent start, he purchased his present home place in 
the east one-half of Section 25 which joins his first tract on the south, the 
two tracts making a fine farm of two hundred acres on which he follows gen- 
eral farming and stock raising on a large scale. He has brought his land u|) 
to a high state of improvement and cultivation through his close application 
and good management. He has a good set of l)uildings and an excellent 
grade of livestock is always to be fcnind on his place. 

Mr. Hicks is a member of the Masonic Order, and he and liis wife are 
both members of the Christian church. 

To our subject and wife three children have been born, namely: Herbert 
Cecil, born July 25. 1899: Gladys Marie, born Sei)tember 2. 1903; and Har- 
lan Eugene, born on Se])tember 2. i9i_'. 



I080 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

WILLIAM FISHER. 

Those who know Wilham Fisher well are not surprised that he has won 
success at his chosen vocation, that of tihing the soil, for he is a man who has 
been a close student of whatever pertains to his chosen life work, believing 
that the best methods are none too good. He has kept his farm in Sugar 
Creek township in fine condition so that its old-time richness of soil has not 
been depleted by the many years of succeeding crops which are gathered in 
abundance from his fields annually, and he ranks with the foremost general 
farmers and stock raisers of the northeastern part of the county where the 
Fisher family has long been well and favorably known. 

Mr. Fisher was born in the township and county where he still makes his 
home on August 26, 1863. He is a son of Samuel and Nancy J. (Corns) 
Fisher. The father was born in Vinton county, Ohio, in 1831. He received 
a common school education, came to Montgomery county, Indiana, when a 
young man, and here devoted himself to general farming, until his death in 
February, 1875. Politically, he was a Republican, but never specially active 
in public affairs. The mother of our subject was born in Montgomery 
county, Indiana, in 1833, and here grew to womanhood, received a common 
school education and spent her life here, dying in 1870. Her parents were 
among the first settlers in this county and members of the same have been 
well known here. 

Samuel Fisher's family consisted of eight children, six of whom are still 
living. He was twice married, and his second wife was the mother of our 
subject. 

Until he was eleven years old William Fisher spent his early life on the 
home farm and there assisted with the general work during the crop seasons 
and he attended the district schools in the winter time. From eleven years 
of age up to the time of his marriage, on October 3, 1889, he was thrown 
on his own resources, working out as a farm hand until he was twenty-six 
years old, when, on December 3, he was married to Martha M. Waugh, who 
was born in Sugar Creek township, this county, in 1867, and is a daughter of 
M. B. and Sarah (Saulsberry) Waugh, a highly respected family. Here 
Mrs. Fisher grew to womanhood and recei\'ed her education in the public 
schools. 

The union of our subject and wife has resulted in the birth of four chil- 
dren, namely: Hallie P.. born June 13, 1893, is at home; Frank W., born 



MoXTCO.MliKV COLNTV. I.\ 1 1| A \ A. I o8 1 

March 31, 1895: Ralph 1!., Iwrn October 7, 18^7: Lloyd M., Ix.rn Xovcmbcr 
3, 1902. 

Mr. Fisher began farming for himself when a young man and he has 
continued this vocation through life until today he is very pleasantly situated 
on a finely improved and productive farm of two hundred and forty acres in 
Sugar Creek township, all of which is tillable but about forty acres. It has a 
natural drainage and is well suited for a stock farm, Mr. Fisher having long 
devoted considerable attention to raising a good grade of live stock of all 
kinds and specialized in the Poland China breed. He has made the improve- 
ments himself on this choice farm, and he has one of the best homes in this 
part of the county. 

Politically, he is a Prohibitionist. He bclnngs to the Masonic Order at 
Colfax. He holds membership with the Melhodist Episcopal church of 
Potato Creek. 



WILLIAM T. SERVIES. 

The name of William T. Servies, long since a traveler to that "undis- 
covered bourne from whence no traveler e"er returns" is worthy of perpetua- 
tion on the pages of history, for it is a name that stands for wliolesome Ii\ing. 
progressiveness in agriculture and cleanliness in pulilic affairs, and the 
younger generation might do worse than to pattern their future careers after 
his: it would mean to them work with little idling in the shade of the tree.s by 
life's wayside, l)nt it would alsu mean a ctmifiirtalile measure of material suc- 
cess and what is more to be desired — a good name and irreproachable char- 
acter. Like man\' another of the helpful ])eo])le who came into Montgomery 
county when it was in its first stages of develoi)ment and here did their full 
share of the further work recpiired to bring about the desired transformation 
from a wilderness to one of the finest farming sections in the state. Mr. 
Servies hailed from the Blue Grass state across the great river to the south, 
but nearly all his life was spent here. 

Mr. Servies was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, March 4, 1831. He 
was a son of William Anderson Servies and Eliza (Pilcher) Servies. The 
family remained in Kentucky until the fall of 1831 when they remo\ed t(^ 
Montgomery county, Indiana, making the tri]) in wagons. They entered 
government land in Brown township, probably one hundred and sixty acres 
where William A. Servies spent the rest of his life. Settlers were few when 
thev arrived and. like the rest of the new-corner^ the elder Servies wcrkeil 



I082 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

hard clearing his land and estabHshing the permanent home of the family, 
but he died when a young man, thirty-six years of age. His first wife pre- 
ceded him to the grave, leaving five children a number of years before, and 
he had remarried, and his second wife survived him. The five children re- 
ferred to were part of a large family, for four children were born of the sec- 
ond union, making nine children in all. Those by the first marriage were 
Mar}', William, John, Julia, Elizabeth and Nancy. Those by the second 
union were James, Martha, Martin and Ellen. 

William T. Servies was about sixteen years of age when his father died. 
He began working out at eight dollars per month and did a great deal of hard 
work, such as clearing the new land of its great woods, splitting rails and 
doing similar work for whoever would hire him in this part of the county. 
He was economical, persistent and uncomplaining, and so he soon had a 
start. On January 3, 1853, ^^ married Nancy Jones, daughter of John and 
Phoebe (Foster) Jones. She was born where she still resides in the north- 
west one- fourth of section 17, Scott township, Montgomery county. Her 
father was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, where he lived until 1828, 
when he came to this county and was thus among the early settlers here. 
He entered from tlie government the quarter section where Mrs. Servies 
was born. Soon afterwards he and Phoebe Foster were married. Their 
first abode was a miserable shack, he not having time to build a house until 
he had cleared some land and got his crop for the season out and culti\ated ; 
in fact, their first dwelling was a rail pen with a temporary cover and their 
table was a goods-box. They started with practically nothing, but worked 
hard, were economical and in due course of time had a good home and a 
fine farm. Their cabin was still standing when William T. Servies and wife 
were married and in it the young couple went to keeping house, this being 
more than twenty-three years after their parents had begun their house- 
keeping there. Mrs. Servies was one of five children who grew up, and 
having an older sister who did the work about the house, Nancy helped in 
the fields and was very fond of the outdoors. She was much in the company 
of her father, and remembers seeing him kill a hoop-snake while it was 
rolling along on the ground like a barrel hoop. After the marriage of the 
subject of this memoir he began farming on his father's place, Mr. Jones 
having been at that time in failing health. Mrs. Servies was only fifteen 
years old when she was married, but notwithstanding her youth she proved 
an excellent helpmeet, sharing the incon\'eniences of pioneer life with its 
hardships and hard work without a murmur, knowing that time would bring 



MONTdOMKRV COrXTV. INDI.WA. I083 

everything out right. They worked together, consulted eadi otlier on a!I 
matters ot importance and prospered with achancing years, finally liecom- 
ing owners of six Inmdred acres of valuable land and for a number of \ears 
'Sir. Servies ranked as one of the leading general farmers and stock raisers 
in the southern part of the county. Later in life he (lev<(ttd a great deal (if 
time to buying and shipping livestock. Ik- l)ecanic one of ilic most widely 
known stock buyers in this locality and everybody liked him for his Ikuh-sI. 
straightforward methods in dealing with his fellow men. lie had a large. 
comfortable home and his land was well impro\ed. 

Seven children were born to William T. Servies, named as folhjws: 
John, who is engaged in the insurance business in I'ortland, Oregon, mar- 
ried Mary Peters, and they have twelve children living, one .son having died 
when a young man; Henry D., the present recorder of Montgomery county, 
is represented in an individual sketch elsewhere in this volume ; Mary is the 
widow of William ^lartin, deceased, and she lives in the northern part of 
Scott township; she has five children living, three having died; all the living 
are married and her youngest son, Claud, lives with her; .\merica ]*".. While, 
fourth child of our subject, is the widow of John While, tleceased. She 
lives in New Market, this counlx. with lier only child, a daughter. Kath- 
arine, anil she owns a farm in Scoll township. Charles Servies died in the 
fall of 191 1 ; he had married Mrs. Emma (Allen) Smith, widow of [■'. A. 
Smith, deceased, who now lives on his farm of one hundred and sixteen 
acres north of Lapland. Maggie Ser\-ies married Albert Seaman; they li\e 
just north of the old Servies homestead in Scott township, and ha\e had 
seven children, one of whom is deceased. Harne}'. who married Grace 
Landis, lives in the northern part of Scott township, and the\' have four 
children, three sons and a daughter. 

Politically. William T. Servies was a Democrat, and was aeli\e in the 
ranks ; howexer, he w as ne\cr an office seeker. 

Mrs. Servies is still living on the farm on which she was born nearly 
seventy-seven years ago. Here she grew to wmnanhood and she has li\ed lo 
see many great changes take place here during the three-quarters of a cen- 
tury of b.er useful and praiseworthy life. She has always been known as a 
good neighbor, kind, charitable and forbearing. Mr. Servies is also re- 
membered as a generous, kind-hearted, upright gentleman, who was well 
thought of by all. Although not a member of an\- church, he attended and 
supported the Primitive Baptist church, and bis honesty and morality were 
so pronounced that others looked ui)on him as a worth}- example to Ije fol- 



1084 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

lowed. It is said that some tried to be like him, but after all there was only 
one \\'illiam T. Serxies. During their younger days he was like a father 
to his brothers and sisters and always looked well to the comforts and gen- 
eral welfare of his own family. He was called to his eternal rest on October 
22, i88s. 



SAMUEL HICKS. 



Deeds are thoughts cr}-stallized, and according to their brilliancy do we 
judge the worth of a man to the country which produced him, and in his 
works we expect to find the true index to his character. The study of the 
life of the representative American never fails to offer much of pleasing inter- 
est and valuable instruction, developing a mastering of expedients w'hich has 
brought about most wonderful results. The subject of this review is a worthy 
representative of that type of American character and of that progressive 
spirit which promotes public good in advancing individual prosperity and con- 
serving popular interests. Members of the Hicks family have long been 
prominently identified with the affairs of Montgomery county, and while 
their endeavors along material lines have brought them success they have also 
advanced the general welfare by accelerating industrial activity. 

Samuel Hicks, one of the prosperous and modern agriculturists and stock 
men of Clark township, was born in this township and county on December 
5, 1856. He is a son of Preston and Martha A. Hicks, a complete sketch of 
whom, containing the early history of the family, is to be found on other pages 
of this work, hence will not be necessary to repeat here. 

Samuel Hicks grew to manhood on the old homestead in Clark township 
and there assisted with the general work when a young man during the crop 
seasons, attending the common schools in the wintertime, not leaving the 
parental roof until he was twenty-four years of age. On January 2, 1881 he 
married Elizabeth Payne, daughter of John F. and Mary Ellen (Dinsmore) 
Payne. She was born in Boone county, Indiana. Her father was born and 
reared near Paris, Kentucky, and he was a son of John and Cassandra 
(Hughes) Payne. His boyhood was spent in Kentucky and he came to Indi- 
ana when young, locating in Boone county. Mary Ellen Dinsmore was a 
daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Dinsmore. She was bom in Boone county, 
this state, where her parents were early settlers. Mrs. Hicks lived in Hen- 
dricks county until she was sixteen years old. Her mother died when the 
girl was five years old. When she was sixteen years old her father brought 




SAMUEL HICKS 



MONTGOMERY COUXTY, INDIAXA. 



1085 



lier to Clark township. Montgomery county and liere slie grew to wonianhood 
and was educated and married. Her father moved to Virginia, later Tennessee, 
and spent the last ten years of his life in the South. His death occurred in 
Tennessee on December 10, 191J. fie was a soldier in the Civil war in the 
Tenth Indiana \^olunteer Infantry, with which he saw considerable bard 
service. He was wounded at Atlanta, Georgia. 

After his marriage Samuel Hicks went to farming on one of his father's 
farms. He had already been farming on the shares. He inherited some 
land from his father and bought more and now owns one hundred and fifty- 
nine acres, having sold forty acres recently. He has brought his land up to 
a high .state of cultivation and improvement and has been verv successful as a 
general farmer and stock raiser. In the fall of 1R99 he completed a band- 
some residence on his farm in Section 35 and Section 3(1. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hicks are members of the Chri.stian church. Thev are 
the parents of eight children, namely : Letha, Ernest, Maude, Agnes, Merle, 
Lida, Hazel and Brewer. Letha married Fred Chadd and they live in Hen- 
dricks county, just across the Montgomery county line, east of Ladoga, and 
they have one daughter, Gail. Ernest Hicks married Bertha Henry and they 
live in Hendricks county, also, a mile northeast of his sister, Mrs. Chadd, and 
he and his wife are the parents of two children, Nomian and Lois. Maude 
Hicks married Lee Huckstep and they live northeast of their parents alx)ut a 
mile, on part of the old Hicks homestead : they have one child, a son, Hubert. 
The other five children of our subject and wife are all at home with their 
parents. 



JAMES M. CARTI'R. 



Scott township, Montgomery county, can boast nt no l)ettcr farmer tiian 
James M. Carter, widely known and highly respected as one ni the most 
energetic, self-reliant and enterprising citizens of the eastern ])art of the 
county. He has for many years Ijeen intini;Uei\- associated with the best 
interests and upward progress of his neighborliood. and to his personal in- 
fluence and efforts are due many of valuable and ])ermanent improvements of 
the locality. One of the older .settlers, he has not only l)een an eye witne.ss 
of part of the wonderful growth and development of bis adopted county but 
has actively participated in the changing scenes and has accunndated a valu- 
able store of historical reminiscence. 

Mr. Carter was born in I'utnam county, Indiana, on Se[)teml>er 14, 



I086 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

1840. He is a son of Othias and Artimessia (Grimes) Carter. The fatiier 
was born in Mason county, Kentucky, February 8, 1804, and his death oc- 
curred in Montgomery county, Indiana, on February 15, 1870. The mother 
of our subject was born in Bath county, Kentucky, February 2, 1806. Thev 
grew up in the Blue Grass state, received such educational advantages as the 
early schools of the county afforded and there they were married, removing 
the same year to Monroe county, Indiana, making the trip in a two-wheeled 
cart drawn by a yoke of oxen. They bought a farm in Monroe county and 
lived there until 1839, when they moved to Russell township, Putnam county, 
where they bought the farm on which James M. Carter was born. Only a 
small portion of the place had been cleared, and after our subject was large 
enough to work he helped clear the rest of the land, but he spent a part of 
the winter months in the neighboring scliools. The family remained there 
until 1862, then sold out and moved into the southwest part of Scott town- 
ship, one-half mile west of Parkersburg, and here the parents spent the rest 
of their lives. Ten children were bora to them, an equal number of sons 
and daughters, namely : Nancy married Enoch Railsback, and lived most of 
her life in Scott township; Elizabeth, who remained unmarried, died when 
nearly eighty years old, in the winter of 1911-12; William Simpson died in 
Missouri when about seventy years old, lea\ing a wife and three sons; 
Daniel Thomas lived in Scott township until his death, in May, 1906, leaving 
a widow, who is now living in Russellville. Indiana; Lucinda, widow of John 
Railsback, deceased, and she now lives in New Mexico; Parmelia married 
William Evennan. and they are both now deceased ; John Edward lived in 
Putnam county, and later in life near Parkersburg, this county, and he is 
survived by one grandson. Otto Fowler, of Waveland; James M., subject of 
this sketch; Lucretia, who married Abraham Fink, lives on the old Carter 
homestead, a half mile west of Parkersburg; Eli, the youngest child, li\-es in 
Putnam county, near Bainbridge. 

James M. Carter grew to manhood on the old home place in Putnam 
county, and lived there until 1862, when he removed with his parents to 
Montgomery county, the family locating near Parkersburg. He was married 
on November 16, 1863, to Sarah Frances Warbritton, daughter of Peter and 
Phoebe (Nelson) Warbritton. She was born in the center part of Scott 
township, where the Warbritton brothers now live. Her father was born 
in Virginia, but went to Kentucky when quite young, and they came to 
Montgomerv count}-, Indiana, from Bath county, Kentucky, in pioneer times. 
They entered land from the government as least as early as 1829, when the 



M()NTc;OMKRY COUNTY. INDIANA. I087 

county was just being settled, and lie took his part in the Ino-nillings ;md nther 
pioneer e\ents, and Mr. W'arbritton worketl as hard as e\er man diil in 
clearing and developing his land, lie later told frei|uently cit the varions 
wild animals he saw here and how the wohes disturbed his nightly slumber. 
Mrs. Carter, who was born in 1840, recalls that e\eu in her day a bear was 
killed not far from their home. 

Phoebe Nelson was jjorn in Kentucky, ami was a daughter of Samuel 
and Anna Nelson, also pioneers of Scott township. Peter WarbriUdu and 
wife lived the rest of their lives on the farm they entered from the govern- 
ment. Thirteen children were born to them, all of whom grew to maturity. 
and all but four are still living. They were named as follows: .Martha 
Jane, deceased, was the wife of George E. Grimes, also deceasetl : Sanniel 
W'arbritton, of New Market, this county ; John lives in Garnett, Kansas ; 
Reuben lives in Sedalia, Missouri: Charles lives near Moody, .\rkansas: 
Henr\' lives at Raccoon in Putnam county, Indiana: S;irah I'rances, wife of 
James M. Carter, our subject: Andrew lives on the old home place in the 
central part of Scott township: Anna, deceased, was the wife of Joseph 
Lenover, of Danville, Illinois; Cynthis Ann, deceased, remained unmarried, 
lived on the old home place and died when about thirty-four years old ; Daniel 
lives on the old homestead, his wife, Nancy L., dying some time ago, leaving 
one daughter. Tola \\'orthing1on : Mahala <lied soon after her marriage ti> 
George Taylor: George W'arbritton. who married Lyda Tattock. lives on the 
old home place. 

Two children were Ixjrn to Mr. and Mrs. Carter, namely: Robert 
Sherman Carter, who died on Octo])er 11. 187^), at the age of elexen vears : 
and another son that died in infancy, unnamed. 

After James M. Carter married he rented part of his father's farm and 
farmed there about ten years, getting a good start. He then mo\ed to Mis- 
souri and engaged in farming in that state for one year. He then returned 
to this county in 1870 and purchased eighty acres. Section 20, this farm 
being located near Lapland. The land was timbered, but he cleared it in due 
course of time, after a great deal of very hard work. But being a man of 
courage he never gave over the task until he had developed a good farm and 
established a comfortable home in which he has now been residing for forty 
years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carter both belong to the Primitive Baptist church, hold- 
ing their membership in the Indian Creek church. The\- are regardeil as 
excellent people by their neighbors, being liked and trusted by all who know 
them. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 



MARTIN HICKS. 



To such gentlemen as Martin Hicks, well known agriculturist and stock 
raiser of Ladoga, Montgomer}- county, is the locality of which this volume 
treats indebted for its high rank as a farming section, its prestige and high 
standing as a rich and fine developed community. Mr. Hicks is an adept at 
farming, and has one of the best managed and most orderly farms in his 
township. He is known to his neighbors as a man of sensible views and 
sound convictions on all subjects with which he is conversant, and, taking a 
great interest in the general development of his community while he is labor- 
ing for his individual advancement, he has won and retained the respect and 
good will of all who know him. 

Mr. Hicks was born in Clark township, this county, on August 29, 1862, 
and is a son of Preston and Martha A. (Utterback) Hicks. The father was 
born two miles east of Russell ville, Indiana, on June 28, 1830, and was a son 
of Thomas Jefiferson Hicks and Lucinda (Ragsdale) Hicks. These parents 
came to the state of Indiana from Kentucky in pioneer times, prior to the year 
1830. Probably about 1828 they entered government land in section 25, 
Clark township, Montgomery county, and on this they set to work to estab- 
lish the family home and develop a farm, but the elder Hicks' work was in- 
terrupted by death, which overtook him a few years later. His widow sur- 
vived him just fifty years, having spent all that half century on the home 
farm. Three children were born to them, namely: Eliza,, who married 
Gabriel Davidson; Preston and Samuel S. 

Preston Hicks grew up on the home farm. His first start for himself 
was on forty acres of land which he bought from Silas Davidson in the west 
side of section 25, Clark township. He went in debt for the same, but work- 
ing hard and managing well, he succeeded in paying it out in due time, and 
purchased additional land from time to time until he became the owner of 
fifteen hundred acres and was one of the most extensive farmers and sub- 
stantial citizens of his township. He followed general farming and stock 
raising all his life. He was very successful from a financial standpoint, and 
was a stockholder in the Bank of Ladoga and also in the Ladoga Electric Light 
plant. Politicallv, he was a Democrat all his life and was a loyal supporter 
of the party. Religiously, he belonged to the Christian church. He was an 
excellent financier, prudent and thrifty, far-sighted, bought land when it was 
cheap and improved it well, assisted by a large family of children. He was a 
public-spirited man, progressive in his ideas and took a great interest in the 




MARTIN HICKS 



MOXTGO.MERV COUNTY, INDIANA. 1 089 

good of the conimunily fur whicli lif did much in varitnis ways, l)eing always 
ready to assist in any movement for the good of those concerned. 

He married Alartlia A. L'tterback, a daughter of \rartin and Elizabeth 
(McDowell) Utterback. 

]\lartin Utterback was a native of \Mrginia, born in the Old Dmninion 
in December, 179S, and was a son of Henry and Tabitha (IMcl^owell) Utter- 
back. When Martin was young the family moved to Henry county, Ken- 
tucky, where his parents spent the rest of their lives, dying when their children 
were young and they were all bound out, Martin having been boimd out to 
learn the carpenter's trade. There he grew to manhood and married Eliza- 
beth McDowell. It was in 1830 that they removed to Montgomery county, 
Indiana, locating in the southeastern part of Clark township, near the south 
corner of the county. In 1831 Mr. Utterback entered one hundred and sixty 
acres from the government in that locality and in 1832 moved thereon. It 
was totally unimprox'ed, wild and presenting a discouraging prospect, but be 
was a man of true pioneer courage and grit, and he went to work with a w ill. 
soon having part of it cleared and improved. In connection with farming he 
worked some as a carpenter, and reared his family here. He worked at his 
trade before there were any saw mills in this locality. Such lumber as there 
was, being riveted out. He was an elder in the Christian church, of which 
his wife was also a member. 

Preston Hicks and wife became the parents of twelve children uf whum 
two died in infancy; Jesse, died when about fourteen years old: ^lary Etta, 
died when nineteen years old; MeHssa, married Harrison Britton and lived 
near her old home and died early in December, 1885, leaving one child, Grace 
A., now the wife of \\'alter Harris, of Ladoga; the seven living children are 
William, who lives in Boone county, five miles north of Pittsboro ; Samuel, 
lives near the old home in Clark township, this county; Martin, subject of this 
sketch: Henry A., lives in Denver, Colorado; Thomas J., resides near the old 
homestead in Clark township, also Robert F. and Charles also. 

The father of the above named children died February J7, i8(;5, when 
nearly sixty-five years old, his widow surviving him seventeen years, passing 
away on October 9, 1912 when past seventy-seven years of age. She^had been 
a member of the Christian church since she was sixteen years of age. She 
was greatly interested in church work, and she lived her religiim every day. 
was good to her family, sparing no pains to rear her cliildren in the proper 
way. 

Martin Hicks, of this sketch, grew up on the hnnie farm and he received 
(69) 



logo MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

a common school education. In 1884 when twenty-two years old he married 
Arnetta Peck, daughter of Samuel C. and America (Logan) Peck, and a 
grand daughter of Jacob and Maria (Lane) Peck, who came from near 
Lexington, Kentuck\-, and located in the southeastern part of Clark township, 
Montgomery county, near the Putnam county line, and there entered land 
from the government. America Logan was a daughter of James and Jemima 
(Vorhees) Logan. The grandmother was related to the great criminal law- 
yer and United States senator, Daniel Vorhees. The Logan family came 
from near Logansport, Indiana, to Hendricks county, locating near the Mont- 
gomery county line, just across from Clark township, before the Civil war. It 
was in that county that Mrs. Hicks grew to womanhood and received a com- 
mon school education. 

Martin Hicks has devoted liis life to general farming and stock raising. 
He has been very successful and is now owner of a finely improved and valu- 
able farm of two hundred and ninety-six acres in the home place and also 
other good farms in Clark township. He has a pleasant and attractive home 
and everything about his place denotes good management, thrift and prosperity. 
After his marriage he spent one year in Boone county, then removed to the 
farm where his wife was born in Hendricks county and lived there about 
twelve years, or until 1897, when he moved to his present farm a mile and a 
half south of Ladoga. He is a progressive and scientific farmer, keeps all 
kinds of improved fanning implements and an excellent grade of li\e stock 
is always to be seen in his fields, and large barns. 

Our subject and wife are members of the church of Christ. They are 
the parents of four children, namely Otis C. who married Viva Goslin, lives 
in Scott township near his father, and he and his wife have one child, Geneva 
Florence ; Jesse H. married Julia Edith Osborne, a native of Peterson, Iowa, 
and they have one daughter, Ethel Arnetta. Jesse lives on part of his father's 
farm. Forest L., third child of Martin Hicks and wife, is at home with his 
parents, as is also the youngest child, Ewell -Vernon Hicks, 



THOMAS E. HUSTON. 

One of the molders of public opinion in Montgomery county and one 
of the most public-spirited and influential as well as representative citizens of 
the same is Thomas E. Huston, the able and popular editor and publisher of 
the JJ'azrlaiid Iiuicpciufcuf. and he has shown himself to be a man of fine 
mentality and enterprise and at the same time is a straightforward and unas- 



MONTGOMKKV CUrNTV. IX 1)1 AN A. IO9I 

Sinning gentleman wlmm lo know is tn csiccni and accunl (.'^itn- ri-s|)ccl. lii' 
has shown hi-nisell' at all times to be in liearty sym])atli\ -w itli the ik-Nclopnient 
of this locality and willing to do all in his power to enconrage the same. 

Mr. Hnston was born on February 12. 1863. at Lafonte. Madison 
county, Indiana, and he is a son of Thomas Scott Huston and Olive 1.. 
(Gibson) Huston, both natives of Indiana. The father was a carpenter by 
trade, which he followed successfully all his life, lie was a soldier for the 
Union during the C'i\il war, serving in Company K. Twelfth liidi.uia X'oluii- 
teer Infantry, Army of the Cumberland, llis death occurred .at (irand Junc- 
tion. Tennessee, llis faniil\- consisted of two children. n;imel\ : ( )ra I... 
who is deceased: and Thomas ]•'... of this sketch. 

Mr. Huston, our subject, was educated in the common schools of .Madi- 
son county, then entereil a Normal school at Danxillc, Indian.a, where he 
studied for a period of three years, then became de])Uty surveyor of Dela- 
ware county, which iX)sition he occupied with credit for a period of four 
years, after which he took up photography at Cannelton, Indiana, which he 
followed with success for a period of seven years, then turned his attention 
to the newspaper field and ])urcliased the JJ'ai'claiui Indcpcudciit. and is still 
actixelv engaged in the publication of the saiue. ha\ing rcmo\ed to Wax-e- 
land, and here he has become one of oiu- leading citizens. He has made a 
great success and has im])roved the paper in every way. editorially and fmm 
a mechanical standpoint, and it has proven to be a valuable medium for ad- 
vertisers. 

While taking much interest in the public affairs of his county. Mr. Hus- 
ton is not acti\e politically. Fraternally, he is a meiuber of the Knights of 
Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Modern Woodmen 
of .\merica. Religiously, he is a meml>er of the Christian church. Disciple. 

Mr. Hu.ston is a pleasing gentleman to meet and is deservedly ])opular 
with the people of his locality. 



JOllX WIL1.1.\M MILLF.R. 

Very often it is greatly to the advantage of the farmer's boy that, in- 
stead of rushing off to some town to become a poor grocery clerk or emjjloye 
of a dirty machine shop, he remains in the kxrality where he was brought up 
and where he knows what is necessary to make an honest living. He knows 
when and how to seed and harvest his crops, and knows what is necessary 



1092 MONTGOMERY COUNTY. INDIANA. 

to insure success in the rearing and sale of li\estock. If he leaves for the 
town he must learn another business and enter into competition with men 
who have grown up in the business which he must acquire. He is thus, as a 
rule, at a great disadvantage. This is said for the benefit of the boys who 
have a start in farm business, who, in nine cases out of ten, had better 
remain right where they are if they want insured to them a happy, healthy, 
respectable old age. One of the progressive farmers of Clark township, 
Montgomery county, who has been contented to remain in the section of the 
state of -his nativity and devote himself to the line of endeavor with which 
he was most familiar is John William ISIiller, and one would judge from his 
excellent farm and pleasant home that he has been wise in following this 
course. 

Mr. Miller was born east of Roachdale, Putnam county, Indiana, June 
2, 1854. He is a son of Harvey and Mary E. (Perkins) Miller. Harvey 
Miller was born in Kentucky, probably in Shelby county, December 3, 1827, 
was a son of James and Nancy (Lee) Miller, both natives of Virginia. 
They mo\ed to Montgomery count}', Indiana, when Han'ey Miller was three 
years old, in 183 1. They settled in the south side of Clark township along 
the county line of Putnam county, and entered eight}' acres in section 33, 
and eighty acres in section 34, adjoining. They cleared and improved this 
property and kept it, and there established their permanent home. When 
they first located there they had to live in a rail-pen until they could build a 
log cabin. All the back part of their land was then under water, and they 
began developing the higher land first. James Miller was twice married, 
Harvey Miller being one of fourteen children born of the first marriage, 
and there were se\en children of the second marriage. James Miller's first 
wife died here on the Miller homestead. His scond wife was named Eliza- 
beth Kinder in her maidenhood, who also died here. 

James Miller was born March 14, 1801, and on October 5, 1825, he 
married Nancy Lee. She was born April 12, 1804, and her death occurred 
on January 5, 1844. To them fourteen children were born, as above inti- 
mated. On March 22, 1849, he and Elizabeth Kinder were married. Her 
death occurred on January 13, 1S64. and James Miller passed away on May 
12, 1 87 1. By trade he was a carpenter and cabinet maker, an expert, one 
of the best in his day. 

Harvey Miller was a life-long farmer. He married Mary E. Perkins, 
who was born and reared in Jackson township, Putnam county, and was a 
daughter of \Villiam and Patience (Glen) Perkins, who came from Ken- 



MOXTGOMKRY COLNTV. INDIANA. I O93 

tucky and settled in tlie northern part ut Putnain county in an early day. 
Har\ey Miller fanned in Jackson township until about 1865, then bought 
his father's farm, moving thereto and operating the same a number of years. 

In the early eighties Harvey Miller moved to Ladoga, Montgomery 
countv. It was on May 29, 185 1. that he and Mary E. Perkins were mar- 
ried. To them six children were born, namely: Jeremiah P.. Jolm William, 
Martha Frances, James Willard, Cora Ellen and Jennie F. ; they are all de- 
ceased but Jeremiah and John W. The mother of these children died June 
3, 1896. On September 22, 1901, Harvey Miller married Mrs. Mary A. 
Markey. His death occurred on April 4. 1912. He was a meml>er of the 
Baptist church from early life, but later in life joined the Christian church, 
in which he was a faithful and earnest worker as long as his health per- 
mitted. He was past eighty-four years old when summoned from his earthly 
labors, was widely known and highly respected, and while he was able to do 
so he took an active interest in the affairs of his conmumity and heiiied 
wherever help was needed. 

Tohn W. Miller, the immediate subject of the skelch. was fnurteen years 
old when his parents moved to Montgomery county from Putnam count)-, 
and here he grew to manhood and helped with the work on the place. On 
September 3, 1874, he married Sarah Catherine Gregory, daughter of An- 
derson and Amanda (McDaniel) Gregory. She was born in Clark town- 
ship, this county, her parents having come here from Kentucky, while they 
were young and unmarried, each coming with their parents and tlie.se 
families settled in Putnam county, where the p;irents of our subject's wife 
grew to maturity and were married, and later the\- moved intij Montgomery 
countv. locating their home in Clark township, and here her fatlicr's deatli 
occurred in 1873. Her mother is li\iiig in Roachdale. being now advanced 
in years. 

After the marriage of our subject he began farming two miles east of 
his old home in the south side of Clark town.ship. His wife heired fifty- 
three acres and he bought forty acres adjoining it, and lived there until 
1886, then moved to North Salem and remained there until 1893, engaged in 
the horse business, and kept fine stallions, among the most noted having 
been "Cambus Kenneth" and "Ravenstein." lx)lh registered trotting stock. 
He remained in this business twenty-five years and became widely known 
throughout the country, and most of that time he also carried on general 
farming. Leaving North Salem in 1893 he returned to iiis farm, as it de- 
manded his personal attention. He li\ed there until 1901. then nioxed to the 



1094 MONTGOMERY COUNTY^ INDIANA. 

old Miller homestead, where he lias since resided. Although he made money 
in the horse business, he has of recent years given his attention to general 
farming and stock raising. He owns the original homestead that was 
entered by his grandfather, which place has never been out of the Miller 
family. He also owns eighty acres joining on the west, which he bought in 
June, 1910. About 1903 he cleared fifty-five acres of the north part of his 
farm, and it is now his best land. His finely improved farm of two hundred 
and forty acres, is all tillable and under a fine state of cultivation. He has a 
fine home and numerous substantial outbuildings. It is called the "Golden 
Rule" stock farm. 

Three children have been born to Mr. Miller and wife, namely : Carl 
F., born October 24, 1877, on the farm where his father first went to house- 
keeping, remained on that place until he was married to Bertha Smith. He 
was' living there at the time he was married, and although away part of the 
time, died there on March 12, 1910, leaving a widow and two children. 
Catherine Rose and John Clifford Miller. He was a member of the Christian 
church and also of the Masonic Order. Bertha E. Miller, second child of 
our subject and wife, married Le'te Rogers, and they live in Jackson town- 
ship, Putnam county, and have t\vo daughters, Nina E. and Mary Catherine. 
Edgar Franklin Miller, third child of our subject and wife, was born March 
29, 1887, married Flossie Routh, and they live on the west eighty of our 
subject's farm. They have two cliiklren. Benjamin Franklin and William 
Robert. 

John W. Miller and wife both belong to the Christian church, as do 
also their children. 

Personally, Mr. Miller is a man whose word has ever been regarded as 
good as his or anyone's bond. He is courteous, genial and obliging and is 
liked b\' all who know him. 



JAMES MONROE HESTER. 

To the people of Scott township and the southern part of Montgomery 
county the name of James Monroe Hester needs no introduction, for here 
he has spent. his long, useful and honorable life and is one of the best known 
general agriculturists in the locality, where he has lived to see and take part 
in many momentous changes and where he has been content to labor and 
take the usual vicissitudes of the years, appreciating the good and not com- 
plaining at the bad, and through it all keeping the evaa tenor of his way and 
setting a worthv example for his family and the younger generation. 



MONTCOMKUV COINTV, INDIANA. 1(1<>5 

Mr. ilcsler was burn in Scull inwiishii), lliis conntv, Anj^iist i_^. 1N44. 
He is a son of Adani and Ann M. ( \ aii/andl ) Hester, who canie licrc fmin 
I'leminfj county, Kentucky, almul iSjS ur 1830, locating first in i'ulnani 
ciiunly. jusl across the line frnni .Monti;(inicry cnunty. Three or lour years 
later the elder Hester niu\ed liis taniily across the line into Scott town>inii, 
Montt;'oniery county, huyiu!;- a farm near the soiuhwestern corner ol" the 
township, anil there established the pcruianenl home of the family, and there 
James M., our subject, was born, he beini;- one of live sons and four daui^'h- 
ters. of which famil_\- one son and one daut^hter died in infancy. ( )in' >ub- 
ject was about twenty years old when his mother died, and after one of his 
sisters married he made his iiome with her. He received such educational 
advantages as the schools of his time afforded. In 1875 '^^ married Lucy 
Iiads. daughter of James Wiley Eads and Elizabeth (.Martin) I-.ad--. Site 
was born and reared in Brown township, this county, where her ])arenis had 
settled in an early day. liaxing come here from Shelbyx ille, Kentucky, .\ftcr 
his marriage Mr. Hester renteil land and farmed in this way for a ])eriod of 
thirteen years, during which he got a good start, having remained in I'.mwn 
township all the while. He then luoved into Scott towiisbii). where he has 
since resided, antl he now owns a finely ini])ro\ed and valuable farm of jiis 
own along the (ireencastle and L'raw ford>\ ille road, a mile north of I'arkers- 
burg. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and .Mrs. Hester, namely: Stella 
Mav, the eldest, is at home with her jiarents : Charles Wallace, who i> farming 
near Lapland, married Vermelia Hampton, and they have one daughter. .\u- 
tumn: Fdmer is represented in this work in a separate sketch; IJllie lllanche 
married .\rch Stilwell. and they live a short distance north of her parents. 
and have twn children. Xornia D. and Thomas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hester belong to the Christian church, and politically, he 
is a Republican. 

Adam Hester settled near Parkersburg aw.ay back in the days of the 
first settlers in Montgomery county. Before the days of ]>ike ro.ads ;nid 
trains he hauled lime to Crawfordsx'ille with oxen, wliicli lime was used in 
the building of the first court house of the county, or more jjroperly the lirst 
after the original log court house, lie also hauled lime to Lebanon. WJu-n 
he came here the Cornstalk Indians were still living along the creek bearing 
that name. 

Ann Mann \anZandt. mother of our subject, was a daughter of .\aron 
VanZandt and wife, .\aron X'anZandt and his two sisters owned an en<ir- 



1096 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

mous quantity of land, now a part of the city tjf Philadelphia. He removed 
to Kentucky and they leased the land for a period of ninety-nine _\-ears. This 
land has now been turned over to the heirs, who are probably all descendants 
of Aaron V'anZandt, whose children were Mar)-, who married Moses Bridges, 
of Filmore ; Mandy, who married Anthony Bowen, of Maysville, Indiana ; 
another daughter, probably Jane, married a Hillgoss at Rush\ille, Indiana ; ; 
also Bennett, who is believed to have remained near Shelby ville, Indiana : 
John lived near Fleiningsburg, Kentucky ; Isaiah was a hotel keeper at 
Elizabethville for manv vears in the earlv davs. 



WILLIAM L. ANDERSON. 

There is a great deal in being born under a good eye, one that watches 
and guards off the error and folly that overtake so many young men. The 
parents are able to infuse into their children the spirit of the Spartans — the 
spirit that can meet any fate and make the most of the world — will see their 
children grow to years of maturity with excellent habits and splendid prin- 
ciples and see them become exemplary citizens. William L. Anderson, one of 
Montgomer}- county's progressive agriculturists and public-spirited men of 
affairs, was fortunate in having broad-minded, honest and painstaking parents. 
He was taught from the start the duties of life, not ordinary instruction, but 
the higher duties which all owe to each other and to society. The result has 
been to give him broad ideas of life and its responsibilities and to fit him for 
honorable citizenship. He is a talented minister and versatile writer, also. 

Mr. Anderson was bom in Brown county, Indiana, on July 15, 1847, but 
nearly all of his life has been spent in Montgomery county whither his parents 
removed with him in 1849, locating on the farm where our subject now lives 
in Section 7, Clark township, having conducted the Ladoga Gardens for many 
years with great success. 

He is a son of Madison B. and Salome (Harshbarger) Anderson. The 
father was a farmer and manufacturer of molasses near Ladoga. He was 
born in Montgomery county, Virginia, September 2, 1822 and was a son of 
Joseph and Christina (Britts) Anderson. In 1837 the family removed from 
the Old Dominion to Morgan county, Indiana. When twenty-one years of 
age Madison B. Anderson started in life for himself and came to Montgomery 
county in 1844, he and Salome Harshbarger marrying the same year. She 
was bom in Virginia in 1824, and came with her parents, Jacob and Salome 
Harshbarger, to Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1831. In 1857 when sugar 




WII>I>IA.M L. ANDP^RSON 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. IO97 

cane was first introduced here, Madison B. Anderson was one of the first to 
engage in the manufacture of molasses. He experimented a great deal and 
greatly improved tlie method of manufacture. He was an energetic man and 
spent mucli time and money in improving his processes, and, owing to the 
superior quality of his products, they were always in great demand. 

The early education of William L. .Anderson was obtained in tlie Ladoga 
Seminary and Academy, and in 1869 he entered Kentucky University, where 
he remained until 1871, making an excellent record for scholarship. In 1872 
he entered Meadville Theological School in Pennsylvania, from which institu- 
tion he was graduated in 1874. Following his graduation he was for two 
years tutor in Latin and Greek in the last named school, and at the same time 
he had charge of the church at Milledgeville and also that of Oil Citv. He 
had united with the Christian church in 18C6 and Ijegan preaching the follow- 
ing year. Having completed his college work he I>ecame pastor of the church 
at Aurora, Ohio, after which he preached for the church at Bedford. Ohio. 

Having concluded to combine preaching and teaching, he retiu-ncd to 
Ladoga, Indiana, and attended the Indiana Central Normal and Business Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated. He then taught two years in the Ladoga 
public schools and was elected principal, but accepted the position of superin- 
tendent of the township schools at New Winchester, Indiana. In 1880, he 
became pastor of the church of his denomination in Greenfield, Indiana. .At 
the close of this ministry, he decided to secure a fixed home, that he might 
train and educate his children? and ever since that time he has resided on his 
fine farm adjoining Ladoga, where school facilities are good. .As a minister 
he was very successful, being an able theological scholar, an earnest, logical, 
and not infrequently truly eloquent pulpit orator, and he greatly strengthened 
the churches where he was pastor and was popular with the various congrega- 
tions he served. 

IMr. Anderson has made a success of gardening and has built up a busi- 
ness known and patronized for miles around. .At the same time he has en- 
gaged extensively in preaching, lecturing and writing for various periodicals. 
One of his most popular lectures is entitled, "Historical Evidences of the 
Truths of the Bible." It has been widely quoted and eulogized. He has 
written a small work on "Divorce and Remarriage," which has lieen widely 
circulated, which he has heard from not only from coast to coast in his own 
country, but also from Africa. Two of his books have recently come from 
the press, "The History of Ladoga and \'icinity" and the "History of the 
Harshbargers." 



lOQb MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Anderson is an ardent Prohibitionist and has been twice nominated 
for the legislature on that ticket. He has been frequently employed by that 
party in campaign work and has canyassed several counties in the state. In 
the various organizations formed by the farmers of his county some years 
ago he took active part and was chairman of the joint committees of those 
organizations. Great interest was aroused and much accomplished. He has 
been a champion of every progressive movement in his age in which he has 
always been aggressive. He is considered by some as radical if not fanatical, 
however, the majority of people praise him for the great good he is ac- 
complishing. 

Mr. Anderson was married in 1874 to Ora Johnson, a lady of culture 
and refinement, and to this union five children have been born, namely : Anna,- 
AUie, Angle, Paul and Harry. They are all well educated, having passed 
through high school and taken college work also. For many years Anna 
has taught in the South and at present is connected with the Southern Chris- 
tian Institute, in charge of the mathematical department, at Edwards, Missis- 
sippi. Allie, after leaving business college, took a position with the Phelps 
Publishing Company in Massachusetts. She now has a business of her own 
and occupies an office in the Board of Trade Building at Indianapolis. After 
teaching some years Angle married William Lee, then superintendent of 
schools in New Haven, Indiana. She now resides at Markle, this state. The 
two sons have been connected with \'arious educational institutions in the 
United States. They have been employed by the government at different 
times as experts in botanical research. At present Paul is connected with 
Cornell University, at Ithaca, New York ; and Harry is with Wabash College, 
at Crawfordsville, Indiana. Paul was sent by Cornell University to investi- 
gate the effect of fumes and dust from cement mills on the great orchards 
in New York that were being ruined by the many cement mills nearby. Paul's 
investigations proved that the dust and fumes were injurious, then taught the 
mill men how to collect the dust and make a valuable by-product of it. He 
was later sent to Pennsylvania to investigate the blight that was killing the 
chestnut timber of that state, a valuable natural resource. His brother Harry 
was one of his assistants. He made a thorough and widespread investigation, 
extending into many states, and succeeded in finding the remedy. Both Paul 
and Harry are experts in their lines and are quoted as authority on the sub- 
jects they handle. Harry from infancy has evidenced absorbing interest in 
nature study, collecting and classifying moths and butterflies, also Indian 
relics and other things found in the great outdoors. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. IO99 

William L. Anderson is known as an accurate and thorough inxestigator, 
much interested in the general welfare of humanity, aggressive for the right, 
fearlessly championing the right even if he should stand alone. He is kind 
and considerate of others, generous, obliging and courteous and is popular 
with all who know him. He owns thirty-two acres of land which he culti- 
vates as a garden. 

JOHN D. HOLLAND. 

A well known merchant and business man of Waveland, Montgomery 
county, is John D. Holland. His earnestness of purpose and intense desire to 
li\e in accord with his highest ideals of right, has had no little influence in 
moulding the lives and character of those with whom he was associated, and 
his career as a busy and successful man of affairs is absolutely blameless in 
the community where he has so long lived and acted his part. As a citizen 
he commands great esteem, and it is a tribute well deserxed to class liim 
with the representative men of this section of the count}-. Being at the x-cry 
meridian of life, with vigorous physical powers and mental attributes of no 
mean order, he bids fair to reach the advanced age nf his father and con- 
tinue to be in the future as he has been in the past — a puwer for good in the 
communit}-. 

Mr. Holland was born in Brown township. Montgomery county, April 
10, 1879. He is a son of Joseph O. and Nancy Elizabeth (Smith) Holland. 
The father was born in Xew York City, and the mother was a native of 
Indiana. The father came to Lidiana in 1864 and settled near Parkersburg, 
where he was married, later moving near New Market, Montgomery county. 

Our subject's grandfather, John Holland, came to the LInited States 
from England as a stowaway, at the age of twelve years. He was a sailor bv 
profession. He established liis home in New ^'(Mk Cit\- antl he followed the 
sea until a bale of cotton fell on him in i860. His death occurred in iSoi. 

Joseph O. Holland's family consisted of four children, namely: John 
D.. of this sketch: William Allen lives in Oregon: Ira J. lives in Roaclidale, 
Indiana; Ida May married William Shure. of Roaclidale. Indiana, and tliev 
have two children. 

John D. Holland grew to manhood on tlie home farm in I'.rown town- 
ship and received a common school education. In 1900 he married Bertha 
May Purcell, daughter of James R. Purcell and wife. Mrs. Holland's death 
occurred in 1905 at the age of twenty-eight years, leaving three children, 



IIOO MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

namely: George M., born December i8, 1901 ; Joseph E., born in April, 
1904; and John Bert, born in April, 1905. 

Mr. Holland first took up fanning, later following blacksniithing, 
then began huckstering, then clerked in a store. When he first came to 
Waveland he entered the poultry business in 1895, and in 1897 opened a 
grocery and notion store, later taking up the general mercantile business, in 
which he is still active, carrying a large stock of goods usually found in such 
stores and enjoying an extensive trade with the surrounding country. 

Politically, he is a Democrat. He belongs to the Free and Accepted 
Masons, No. 300, at Waveland, and the Modern Woodmen of America, No. 
9589, at \\'aveland. He is a member of the Baptist church. 



TOHN S. BAKER. 



It is a pleasure to place on the pages of history the life record, however 
brief and unsatisfactory, of such a man as the late John S. Baker, who was 
one of the courageous pioneers of this locality and who labored here through 
a long life of successful endeavor, during which he not only advanced his own 
interests but also those of the community in general, for he was one of those 
neighborly, unselfish and hospitable gentlemen who delighted in seeing others 
progress, and he was so honest that those coming in contact with him need 
not be told of the fact, it was apparent in all his dealings and relations with 
his fellow men. 

Mr. Baker was born in Kentucky, which state furnished more enter- 
prising settlers to Montgomery county than any other, the date of his birth 
being December 8, 1827. He was a son of Isaac and Patsy (Sparks) Baker. 
The father was born on February 5, 1801, and the mother's birth occurred 
on March 30, 1802. Isaac Baker was a native of Kentucky, where he grew 
to manhood and remained until 1830, when he removed to Montgomery 
county, Indiana, with his family, when his son, John S., of this memoir, was 
three years old. The family located in Clark township, entering land from 
the government. Mrs. Baker now lives in New Ross. The elder Baker was 
a typical pioneer, and he did the usual amount of hard work clearing and de- 
veloping his land. His family consisted of two children, John S., of this 
memoir; and Jonas, deceased. 

John S. Baker grew to manhood on the old homestead in Clark town- 
ship, and there he found plenty of hard work to do, like all pioneer children. 




JOHN S. BAKEU 



MOXTGOMICKV COUXTV, INDIANA. IIOI 

He received a iDeager education in llie early schools of his daw and when a 
young man took up farming, which he continued all his life, making a com- 
fortable living for his family, leaving eighty acres of excellent and jiroductive 
land in Clark township, which his widow rents. 

]Mr. Baker was married on June 12. 1851, to Lucinda t'lark, daughter of 
Willis and Hannah (Jones) Clark. Her father was born in Kentucky, where 
he grew to manhood, and there married. He moved with his family to 
Putnam county, Indiana, when his daughter, Lucinda, was six months old, 
and later they came to Montgomery county and established their permanent 
home in Clark township, where Mr. Clark spent the rest of his life. He was a 
hard-working, honest man, whom his neighbors respected, and he followed 
farming all his life. He was a Democrat and a member of the Christian 
church. His family was a large one, consisting of sixteen children, namely : 
Joseph J., the oldest; William T., Milton, Nathan, James M., Benjamin, 
Winifred, Oliver, John, Francis M. are all deceased; Lucinda, who married 
Mr. Baker, of this review; Sidney J., Susan C, are both deceased; Alexander 
C. is living; Mary is deceased; Fanny, the youngest, is living. 

Eight children were born to John S. Baker and wife, namely : Winifred 
is deceased; Harriet E. is living at home with her mother; Emma, Martha 
H., George, are all deceased; Mary A. is the wife of Walter Canine; William 
is deceased ; and the youngest died in infancy, unnamed. 

The death of John S. Baker occurred on June 12, 1897. 



ISRAEL HARRISON WHITE. 

Tlie true western spirit of progress and enterprise is strikingly exempli- 
fied in the lives of such men as Israel Harrison White, one of Montgomery 
county's honored native sons, whose energetic nature and laudable ambition 
have enabled him to conquer many adverse circumstances and advance 
steadily. He has met and overcome obstacles that would have discouraged 
many men of less determination and won for himself not only a comfortable 
competency, together with one of the very choice farms of Scott township, 
but also a prominent place among the enterprising men of this favored sec- 
tion of the great Wabash Valley country, and now in the mellow autunui 
period of his life this venerable citizen can Inok l)ackward (i\er the l')ng 
stretch of weary years witliout regret or conipunctiim. Such a man is a 
credit to anv communitv. His life forciblv illustrates what energv and con- 



I 102 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

secutive effort can accomplish when directed and controlled In- correct prin- 
ciples and high moral resohes, and no man is worthier of mention in a 
volume of the province of the one in hand and of the material success he has 
achieved and the esteem in which he is held. 

Mr. White was born in section 9, Scott township, Montgomery county, 
March 17, 1839. He is a son of William S. and Amy (Watkins) White. 
The father was born in Greene county, Ohio, not far from the city of Day- 
ton, on March 6, 1817, being a son of Benjamin and (Blair) 

White. About 1833 the family came to Montgomery county, Indiana, when 
William S. White was sixteen years old, and here Benjamin White bought a 
farm about two miles southeast of Ladoga. There they established their 
permanent home, developed a good farm and became well known. They 
worked hard, clearing the land of its virgin growth of timber and finally 
had one of the choice farms of the township. Their family consisted of 
twelve children, named as follows : Mrs. Eliza Kelsey, William, John, 
James, Mrs. Hannah Imel, Mrs. Elmira Elrod, Mrs. Charlotte Smith, Benja- 
min F., Thomas, and two who died in infancy unnamed. 

Benjamin White, the father of this family, was the owner of half a 
section of land. He was a carpenter by trade, as was also his sons. He and 
his family were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and he was a 
licensed exhorter and class leader in the church in his earlier years. 

When William S. W^hite was about nineteen years old he married Amy 
Watkins, daughter of George and Rebecca (Kelly) Watkins. She was born 
near Dayton, Ohio, and her people moved here at the same time the White 
family came, a number of them coming together. The Watkins family set- 
tled in Section 3, Scott township, and there made their home until 1864. 
There were also twelve children in this family, namely : Mrs. Betsy Harri- 
son, Mrs. Amy White, Atchison, Mrs. Jane Custer, Mrs. Sarah Mills, Will- 
iam, Russell, Mrs. Rebecca Ann Barnett, Daniel K., and three other children 
who died young. The Watkins family were also active workers in the 
Methodist Episcopal church here in the early days. George Watkins was a 
soldier in the war of 1812. 

William S. White, father of Israel H. White, had nothing of this 
world's good at the time of his marriage, but his wife and a knowledge of 
the carpenter's trade. He went in debt for one hundred dollar's worth of 
tools, and started out on his career in Ladoga. Their dining-room table was 
a dry-goods box. He was an earnest, hard worker and finally succeeded. 
He bought eighty acres of land in the northeast one- fourth of Section 9, in 



MONTGOMKRV COUNTY. INDIANA. II03 

Scott township. Xot a tree had 1)een cleared from tlie hiud. lie went lo 
work with a will, cleared the ground and developed a good farm, cstahlisli- 
ing a comfortable home there. He prospered and bought more land until 
he became the owner of about four liundred and fifty acres nf g(»i(l land. 
He gave up carpenter work years before, although he was a very able man 
at framing with heavy timbers, bridge work, etc.. and many of the old ])arns 
are still storm proof by reason of the substantial and skilful \\a>- be built 
them. 

He, too, was the father of twelve children, as bad been his father and 
his wife's father. They were named as follows: Mrs. Mary Rebecca (iar- 
man, deceased: Israel H., subject of this sketch; Benjamin F., who died 
during the Civil war w bile in the service of the Union : Rirs. Elizabeth Mer- 
cer, of Ladoga : Sarah Hubbard, deceased ; Elmira. deceased : George W. 
of Lebanon. Indiana : Josephine, deceased : Mrs. Susan Kelsey of Scott 
township: I-Vedonia Alice is deceased: John B., deceased, but his widow li\'es 
in Xew Alarket, this county: Emma Caroline is deceased. 

The mother of the abo\e named children died .\]>ril 24. iSyh. when past 
eighty-four years of age. The father's death occurred on May u. i8g8, 
reaching the age of eighty-two years. 

Israel H. White grew to manhood on the home farm, and he received 
his education in the common schools of his community. He learned the car- 
penter's trade under his father, who required of the boy the same strict 
accountability that he did of his other employes and paid him the same wages 
for the same work. Our subject also engaged in farming, and in 1873 he 
purchased the place where he now lives. The following fall the panic came 
on and made hard sledding for him. but he held on and in due course of time 
prospered through his close application and good management, and be now 
owns a valuable, productive and well ini])ro\ed farm a mile long in Section 4, 
Scott township, consisting of o\-er one hundred and si.Kt^-three acres. 

Mr. White was married on January 5. 1881, to Elizabeth Dorothy 
Ellington, daughter of James M. and Eliza J. (See) Ellington. She was 
born in Nicholas county, Kentucky, September 30, 1852. When she was 
seven years old her parents removed to North Salem, Hendricks counlw 
Indiana, where her father continued his trade of blacksmith. While li\ing 
in Kentucky he had for years employed a negro sla\-e. howex'er he was op- 
posed to slavery, being very pronounced in bis views again.st the .system. 
He and his wife spent the rest of their lives at North Salem, and there Mrs. 
White grew to womanhood and was educated, remaining there until her 



II04 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

marriage to Mr. White. To this union five children were born, four of whom 
are li\ing, one, Fannie May, dying when nearly three years of age; Mabel 
Estelle is the wife of Perry R. Himes, and they live in Section lo, Scott 
township, and have four children. Norma, Audrey, Elizabeth and Amy; 
Lolita Belle, second child of our subject, is the wife of Earl Lee; they live 
in Peoria. Illinois, and have two daughters, Florence Elizabeth and Mabel 
Cordelia the third child William Ashby White is at home and is assisting 
his father with the work on the farm : Ina Cordelia, the ^•oung■est child is 
attending school at New Market. 

Israel H. White is a member of the Alethodist Episcopal church, and 
his wife belongs to the Christian church. He became a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows many years ago. 



CHARLES A. MINNICH. 

Charles A. Minnich, one of the leading farmers and stock men of Wal- 
nut township, is one of those men of whom it is a pleasure to write. He is 
modest in the opinion of himself, not claiming the worth and importance 
that others are ready and anxious to ascribe to him. He is quiet and unas- 
suming in manner, as such characters always are, and holds the high place 
which has been given him in the public favor by right of what he is, and not 
of what he claims. It is a grateful task to write of such a one, and the only 
danger is, that sufficient merit will not be ascribed; yet the hearts of his 
friends, and they are very many, will supply any lack of words on the part of 
the writer, or any failure to express happily the true thought. 

Mr. Minnich is a native of the grand old state which has won the ap- 
propriate soubriquet of "the mother of Presidents" — eight of the nation's 
chief executives having first seen the light of day within her borders. He 
was born at Newcastle, Craig county, Virginia, June 26, 1852. He is a son 
of Andrew J. and C. Adeline (Mills) Minnich. The father was postmaster 
at the town of Newcastle for several years before the Civil war. During 
that mighty conflict he was a soldier in the Twenty-eighth Virginia regi- 
ment. Company B, fighting for the Southern army, and he was killed during 
the seven days' battle around Richmond, or more specifically the battle of 
Fair Oaks, on June 2, 1862, when his son, Charles J., was scarcely ten years 
of age. The latter was one of three children, an older brother being John 
L., and Frances S. was a younger sister. The family came to Indiana in 



187-'. landing at Mace. Montgoiiierv county, vu January j()tli nf that year. 
Andrew J. Minnich luul (|uite a large estate in X'irginia. which \va> sold after 
his death by the adniinislralnr and paid for in C on federate ninne\ , which had 
to be exchanged for a later issue of Confederate money, and this being 
finally of no value, the family was left almost penniless. They had but little 
to keep the wolf from the door when they landed in Montgomery county, 
but they went to work with a will and in due course of time were very com- 
fortably located. They first rented a little log house in the southern part of 
Walnut township, bought a team of horses and an old wagon and farmed on 
the shares for two years, then leased twenty-five acres of Joe Markey's place 
in the western part of Clark township, which was heavily timbered, having 
leased it for nine years. The)- cleared the land and improved it and from 
that got a new start. Charles sold his interest in the place to his brother in 
April, 1S75, for four hundred dollars, then went to work for himself. In 
1878 he purchased eighty acres in Section 29, W'alnut township, at twelve 
dollars and fifty cents an acre. He paid fixe hundred and ten dollars down 
and went four hundred dollars in debt. His neighbors predicted that he 
would never pay out, but he did pay out and succeeded admirably. The 
same land at this writing would now be worth perhaps one hundred and 
seventy-five dollars per acre. He later purchased fifty-one acres across the 
road west of where he now lives, paying eighteen dollars an acre for it, but he 
failed to pay it out and finally sold it. About six }-ears later he bought it 
back at forty dollars an acre, and he still owns it. He has since jnirchased 
additional land, now owning several valuable and producti\e farms, aggre- 
gating about two hundred and sixty acres. On this land are three different 
sets of buildings and modern improvements in general, all three residences 
being good ones. His land is thoroughly tiled and well drained ; in fact, the 
cost of drainage was more than the cost of the land. He has always followed 
general farming and stock raising, and although he has met many reverses 
he has forged ahead despite all obstacles, and is now one of the substantial 
men of his township. 

Mr. ]\Iinnich has long been active in the Repulilican ranks, in fact ever 
since he was old enough to vote. He was elected trustee of \\"a]nut township 
in 1894. taking charge of the office in 1895, holding the same for five years, 
during which time he built the new school house that now stands in X'ew 
Ross in 1898, selling the old school house and grounds. 

On Januarys 9, 1878, he married Isabelle Downing, daughter of Edward 
and Emilv (Botts) Downing. She was ])orn in Boone count\-, Indiana. Her 
(70) 



II06 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

father died when she was four years old, and she was about seven years old 
when her mother died. Edward Downing was a son of James and Avis 
(Gideons) Downing; Edward Downing was born on January 25, 1824. 
James Downing was born in Ireland, coming to America when a young man 
and here he met and married Avis Gideons, a native of England. Emily 
Botts was a daughter of William and Sarah Botts, who came to Boone county, 
Indiana, from Ohio. The other children of the Downing family are Well- 
ington, who lives in Indianapolis; Romulus, of Howbert, Colorado; Mary A., 
wife of Butler Neal, of Lebanon, Indiana ; Ephriam D. lives at Home, Kan- 
sas ; Oliver M. lives at Hortonville, Boone county, Indiana. 

After Mrs. Minnich's parents died she lived with an aunt in Hendricks 
county a year and later was given a home with James H. Harrison and family 
of Walnut township, this county. 

Seven children have been born to the subject and wife, named as fol- 
lows: Andrew E., Harvey L., Clara D., Romulus D., Mary Avis, Charles 
Oliver and Frances Olive, twins. 

Andrew Minnich owns a farm south of his father's. He married Lola 
Batman, daughter of Dolph and Ella B. Batman, and to this union two chil- 
dren have been born. May Isabelle and Dorothy Esterine. Harvey L. Min- 
nich married Iva Bowman and lives on a farm lying just east of that owned 
by his father; he and his wife had four children, one of whom, Vera Lucile, 
is deceased ; Ruth, Ralph and Neva are the living children. Clara Minnich 
married George E. Peters, and they live at Nespelem, Washington, both she 
and her husband being teachers in the Indian school there on the reservation; 
they have two children, Harold Truman and Frances Minnich Peters. Romu- 
lus D. Minnich is connected with the A. S. Clements commission house in 
Crawfordsville, in which city he lives. Mary Avis Minnich married Ottie 
Douglas, and lives in North Dakota, just east of the Montana line on a home- 
stead. Their postoffice is Carlyle, Montana. They have one daughter, Olive 
Marie. Charles and Frances Minnich are both at home. Both were grad- 
uates from the high school at Mace. 

Charles A. Minnich and all but one of his family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, he being trustee of the church of this denomina- 
tion at Mace. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. i\Iinnich's mother and his sister removed to Kansas in 1878, and the 
mother died there on October 27, 1888, and is buried in Linn county, Kan- 
sas. The sister married William Hinkle, and they live in Stillwater, Okla- 
homa. The brother of our subject is now at Lordsburg, California. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTV, INDIANA. IIO7 

CLIFTON G. HILL. 

The name of Clifton G. Hill, a venerable and highly esteemed citizen of 
Clark township, Montgomery county, of which township lie is trustee, needs 
no introduction to our readers, for here much of his interesting and indus- 
trious life has been spent and here he has labored to the general good of the 
community, his work not by any means being without fruits, as all will tell 
you who are in any way familiar with his career. Such men are \-alua])le to 
any community and their lives might be held up as examples for the young 
men to pattern after. 

Air. Hill was born in Franklin county, \'irginia, August 2i), 1839, being 
the scion of a fine old family of the Old Dominion, and a son of Collin and 
Julia L. (McCrosky) Hill, the father having been of' Scotch descent and the 
mother of Scotch-Irish extraction. The father died when our subject was 
four years old, and he was only eighteen when his mother was called away 
by death. Ten children were born to these parents. When the mother died 
the two eldest were married and gone, and our subject and one brother had 
to care for the family. The children were reared on a farm. After he grew 
up, Clifton G. Hill worked out one year for the sum of one hundred and 
eight dollars, and he saved nearly all of it. He then went into business w ith 
his brother and another man as photographers. They bail a car on wheels 
and traveled about through the country just before the war. Wlien hostili- 
ties began all three joined the Confederate army, our subject choosing Com- 
pany K, Forty-second Virginia Volunteer Infantry, in which he saw much 
hard service and made a very faithful and gallant soldier for the stars and 
bars, participating in about thirty-two engagements, many of them the fiercest 
of the war. He was captured at Manassas Junction, or Second Bull Run. 
He was in command of an advanced squad in a railroad cut, helping a 
wounded comrade, when the enemy rushed them and cajjtured him. During 
another charge they rushed over him, he pretending that he had lieen killed, 
and although he was badly trampled he escaped. The following day he was 
wounded by a piece of bomb-shell which struck his canteen and cut it in two ; 
however, it did not so much as break the skin on him, merely shocking 
him and making his leg turn black its full length, the bruise and concussion 
being severe. He was again captured at Monocacy in Marvdand, while in 
command of his company, he having gone to an ex])osed place for the ]iur- 
pose of reconoitering and was returning when he was shot through the 
hand. Sharp shooters kept peppering away at him and he had to lay low 



IIOO MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to avoid them and soon became weakened from loss of blood. But he finally 
got his wound dressed and had one finger cut off. He refused to take ether, 
sitting cjuietl)- on a piece of timber- while the surgeon operated. After his 
regiment was dri\en out and, not having enough ambulances to move all the 
wounded, he was left behind and captured. He was taken to the stockade in 
which his own regiment had camped for some time and finally escaped from 
it by a way previously used by the boys when they "slipped out" during the 
night for the purpose in going to the town nearby "for fun." Mr. Hill was 
also wounded at the battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam, in Maryland, where 
he was shot through the hip. He was carried off the field on a stretcher and 
narrowly escaped capture again. He was also shot in the chest by a spent 
ball at Cedar Mountain, where he also had sixteen holes shot through his 
clothes. Of fifty-two in the company who were in ad\'ance, all but twelve 
were killed or wounded in a terrific fight. He remained in the service until 
the close of the war, and was always at the front except when he was 
wounded. He was with the great fighter, "Stonewall" Jackson, and neces- 
sarily saw the hardest of fighting, but he never faltered. 

After the war Mr. Hill took up farming, spending one season on the 
home farm, and in the spring of 1866 he came to Ladoga, Montgomery 
county, Indiana. He worked out for seventeen months, never losing a day. 
He had onlytwenty-seven dollars and fifty cents when he came here. He saved 
his money and later bought a farm, and then for ten years he rented a farm 
southwest of Roachdale. In 1878 he bought eighty acres in the southern part 
of Clark township, on which he moved and a year later he met with the mis- 
fortune of having his house burned, with no insurance and when he was in 
debt eleven hundred dollars. Nothing daunted, he borrowed funds and re- 
built his dwelling, and, managing well and working hard, he prospered with 
advancing years, and from time to time has added to his original holdings 
until he is now the owner of five hundred and twenty-two acres of valuable 
and well improved land and carries on general farming and stock raising on 
a large scale, having long ranked among the leading and most substantial 
farmers of the county. For a period of twenty years he has also bought and 
shipped live stock. He was also for sometime a manufacturer of carriages 
and buggies in Ladoga, building up a large business in this line, building the 
factory that is now run by William Rapp. Owing to the high grade of his 
output his vehicles were in great demand. 

Politically, Mr. Hill is a Democrat, and has been active and influential 
in local affairs. For the past five years he has been trustee of Clark town- 



MONTGOMERY COUXTV. IXDIANA. IlOf) 

ship, and he has two years more to serve of liis present term, lie lias given 
eminent satisfaction in this position to all concerned. Sn well did he dis- 
charge the duties of his otiice that in lyio the held examiners for the stale 
board of accountant wrote of him as follows: "lie is one of the most care- 
ful, exact and conscientious business men that we ha\e found in the oftice of 
trustee. He gives "personal su])er\ision to all of the details of lx)tli his ci\ il 
and school township work. His rejiort was exact in details and conclusive 
in all its findings. We liaxe onl}- words of commendation for the trustee of 
Clark township." 

.Mr. Hill was married on December u, 1X07 to llattie P. Hymer, who 
was born in f'utnam county and is a daughter of Jesse 1'. and Eliza (<jill) 
Himer. She grew to womanhood and was educated in her natixe county and 
there resided until her marriage. Her parents came from Bath county, Ken- 
tucky, in the early days and settled in Franklin township, Putnam county, 
west of Roachdale. 

Five children have been born to Mr. antl Mrs. Flill, one of whom died in 
infancy; the living are: Otro, married Ella Ashby, daughter of John Ashby 
and they have one son, Earl Hill; Cecil, married Mary Christy, and ihey ha\e 
had three children, Carl, Gladys and Glen, the latter d\-ing when three \ears 
old; Eva Lee is at home: Clemmie is the wife of H. O. Botman and li\es in 
Bainbridge. 

Fraternally, Mr. Hill belongs to the Scottish Rite Masons, the Com- 
mandery at Crawfordsville, and the Murat Temjile, Ancient Aral)ic Order 
of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Indianajjolis : he is alsci a luember of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Hill is one of the best known cattle men in the county, and is now 
making a specialty of breeding shortdiorn cattle. At this w riting he has a 
herd of over sixty pure bred short-horns. In fact, he has been in this busi- 
ness ex'er since he began farming, even when a renter, and he attributes nuich 
of his success to raising such stock. He has won a great reputation in west- 
ern Indiana with his short-horns and they are in great demand and bring 
fancy prices owing to their superior quality. He is a scientific farmer, em- 
ploying such modern methods as are apj^hcable to the land and climate here, 
and his farm now produces nearly double what it formerly did. He is cer- 
tainly entitled to a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished, liaving 
worked his way up from the bottom of the ladder in the face of all kinds of 
adversitv. 



MONTGOMERY COUNT'i-, INDIANA. 



TAYLOR THOMPSON. 



Many elements contribute to the development of a new country, but no 
one thing plan's so large a part as sterling worth and character. It is to the 
rugged, steadfast men and women who come into its domain that the new 
land must look, and it is most often the plain, blunt men of business and 
every-day affairs who most affect a new country's history. Among the 
families of Montgomery county who hax'e contributed their share of in- 
fluence and labor toward its development is the Thompsons, members of 
which family came here in an early day, and throughout the years that have 
passed since then they have played an important part in the affairs of the 
community of their residence during the most momentous period of this 
locality's development, and one of the best known of the family of the 
present generation was Taylor Thompson, of Crawfordsville, the secret of 
whose popularity lay in the fact that he was always allied with those things 
which tended toward the advancement and betterment of his native county. 
While a careful and straightforward business man, he was never a dollar 
worshipper or permitted the lust of greed to eradicate his higher ideals, be- 
lieving that life held much of greater value than mere wealth of estate. 

Mr. Thompson was born on December 31, 1834, in Ripley township, 
Montgomery count}-. He was a son of William and Margaret (Mumfort) 
Thompson. They were both natives of Ohio, from which state they came to 
Montgomery county, Indiana, when children, and here they grew to maturity 
and were married. William Thompson learned the carpenter's trade when 
a young man, which he continued to follow in connection with farming in 
this county. His earlier life was spent in Ripley township, and his later days 
in Crawfordsville, in which city his widow is still living, he having passed 
to his eternal rest on March 10, 1890. He and his wife had only two chil- 
dren — Taylor, of this review : and Anna, who married A. E. Livengood, he 
being now deceased; she was born in 1864, and' is living in Crawfordsville. 

William Thompson was a Democrat and was more or less active in 
public affairs. He was a trustee of Ripley township for a period of four 
years. He was a member of the Horse Thief Detective Association. 

Taylor Thompson grew to manhood on the home farm in Ripley town- 
ship, and there assisted with the general work when a boy, and received his 
education in the common schools ; however, his education was limited and 
had to be made up in after life by miscellaneous home reading, but this and 



MONTGOMERY COUXTV, IN'mANA. 11 I 1 

close observation and actual contact witli tlie world, supplied well the dcli- 
cieiicy. 

Mr. Thompson was twice married, tirst, on November 25, 1874, to Ida 
M. Sidle, who was born May 28, 1854, in this county, a daughter of Joseph 
and IMatilda (Taylor) Sidle. Her death occurred on February jo, kjoG, 
leaving three children, one having died, namely: Cora, who married (ieorge 
F. Anselm, was born on August 12, 1876: they li\e in Indianapolis, and they 
have one child. Elizabeth, born September 3, 1910; William Fee. born 
Xovcniber 24, 1880, married Catherine Holmes, antl they also live in Indian- 
apolis; they have nne child, \\'illiam Flolmes Thompson, burn June 30, 1905; 
Harry died in infancy. 

Mr. Thompson was married a second time on November 15, 191 1, his 
last wife being Catherine Kelley, who was born in Fountain county, In- 
diana, in 1863, and she grew to womanhood and was educated in her native 
community. She is a daughter of John and Catherine (Downs) Kelley. 

Mr. Thompson made his start in life on the farm, carrying on a general 
farming business with success until ]March 3, 1893, when he retired from 
active agricultural pursuits and moved to Crawfordsville, where he entered 
business. After coming here he became active in politics and held the posi- 
tion of bailiff of the court here for the past sixteen years. He was con- 
nected with the Democratic County Committee since 1888, and his influence 
and counsel contributed much to the success of the party here. Shortly 
before his death he was in the race for postmaster at Crawfordsville, and, 
owing to his general popularity and peculiar fitness, his appointment was 
regarded by his friends as most probable, seventeen hundred representative 
voters of Crawfordsville having endorsed his candidacy. 

Mr. Thompson was always an ardent Democrat, following in the foot- 
steps of his honored father in this respect. Fraternally, be belonged to the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Thompson owned a substantial residence in Crawfordsville, also 
several valuable pieces of property in the same section of the city. 

On May 6, 1913, Mr. Tbomp.son was called to his Maker, at the age of 
fifty-eight years. 

The Crazvfordsx'ille Journal, of May 7, speaks briefly : 

" 'Taylor,' as he was known by hundreds of personal friends, has been 
a leader in Democratic politics for the past fifteen years. He was county 
chairman at one time several years ago, and since that time has had more 
to do with the success of his party than any other man in it. His active 



MONTGOMERY COUNTV, INDIANA. 



political career and his work as court bailiff gave him a wider ac(|uaintance 
perhaps than any man in Montg(jmery county. He knew everybody in the 
county. He was an excellent judge of human nature, and few men were 
able to run the gauntlet of his inspection without being accurately weighed." 



ORPHEUS W. BRATTON. 

In a county like Montgomery, where there are so many men of excellent 
moral character, pronounced business ability and social nature, it would be 
hard indeed to determine who would be most worthy. There are some, how- 
e\er, who are generally conceded by their neighbors to take a place in the 
front ranks of usefulness and influence. Such is the gentleman above named, 
who manifests an abiding interest in the intellectual development and spiritual 
upbuilding of the community in which he lives as well as in its material pros- 
perity and who, while managing his own affairs in so prudent a manner as to 
take his place among the solid men of Walnut township, yet finds time to 
serve his fellow men in various ways. 

Orpheus W. Bratton was born on June i8, 1862, northwest of Mace, in 
Union township, this county. He is a son of Charles L. and Catherine 
(Dice) Bratton. 

Charles L. Bratton, one of the pioneer settlers of Montgomery county, 
was born in Augusta county, June ig, 1819. and there he spent his early 
boyhood years, being fourteen years old when, in 1832, he accompanied his 
parents in a four-horse wagon from the Old Dominion to Montgomery 
county, Indiana, leax'ing Virginia on September 12th, and reaching here 
October 12, 1832. They traveled through the week and rested on Sunday 
and greatly enjoyed their rough overland journey through the woods and 
wilderness. His parents were William and Mary G. Bratton. His father 
was a soldier in the w^ar of 181 2. and both his grandfathers were in the 
Revolutionary war. His father was a Jackson Democrat, a Whig, then a 
Republican. His mother was a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Charles L. Bratton went to school in a log cabin and sat on puncheon 
benches, and had greased paper for windows. He lived with his father until 
he was twenty-five years old, having always been a farmer. He became 
owner of a productive and well-kept farm of one hundred and sixty acres, 
on which stood a substantial two-story brick house, about five miles from 
Crawfordsville. On January 11, 1844, he married Catherine Dice. She 



■mS9m,% 



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} 




MUNTGOMKKV (.OrNTV. INDIANA. 1 \ ] J, 

was born on Xoveml)er 9, 18J4. Slie was a member of tlie Presbyterian 
cburch. Her deatb oeeurred in 1883. 

Charles L. Bratton eontiniied to reside on his farm in L'nicjn township 
until late in life, and in the early nineties he sold his place and lived w itli his 
children, spending some time with first one, then another, until his death, on 
December 21, 1902, at an advanced age. He was a faithful member of the 
Presbyterian church from his twenty-third year until his death, and toward 
the latter part of his life was a deacon in the church. He was a Good Tem- 
plar, a member of the Horse Thief Detective Association, and was a loyal 
Republican. He cast his first vote for Gen. William Henry Harrison in 
1840. He was a well read man, and was an intelligent, prosperous and 
honored citizen. He retained the patent to the land wdiere he lived so long, 
which patent was issued to Charles Johnston, and signed by President Andrew 
Jackson. 

Ten children were born to Charles L. Bratton and wife, namely: Mary, 
who married Andrew Smiley, lived all her life near Mace: David was mar- 
ried and had two children, one of whom is still living; David was a farmer 
and lived near Mace : William is engaged in merchandising and the fish com- 
mission business at Cortez, Florida: Ella was the wife of Joseph W. Ward, 
and lived south of Crawfordsville until her death, in August, 1912; Johnnie 
died W'hen two years old; Charles M. lives in Crawfordsville; James B.. de- 
ceased, lived in Lebanon, where he died in December, 1909; Harvey B. lives 
near Linnsburg; Orpheus W., subject of this sketch: Rachel Jennie married 
Joseph A. Ward, and lives in Cass county, Indiana. 

Orpheus W. Bratton grew to manhood on the home farm and there 
assisted with the general work, and he received a good education in the 
common schools. 

In January, 1887, Mr. Bratton married Ida M. Schenck, daughter of 
Jacob and Frances (Tilly) Schenck. She was Ixirn in Bocme county, In- 
diana. Her mother died when Mrs. Bratton was a little child, and this 
event broke up the home. There were at that time also two little brothers, 
who grew *to manhood and are still living — Milton and John, the former 
residing near Colfax, and the latter in Wyoming, .\fter the death of the 
mother of these children the father moved about a great deal, living for 
awhile in Putnam county, but most of the time in Montgomery county, not 
far from Linnsburg. The father, Jacob Schenck, spent his old age with his 
daughter, Mrs. Bratton. and died at her home on February 3, 1899. 

After his marriage Orpheus W. Bratton began farming for himself a 



1 1 14 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

mile and a half southeast of Linnsburg, beginning on rented land, and there 
he continued for about fifteen years, during which he got a good start. This 
was the Ward farm. For eight years before her marriage, Mrs. Bratton 
had lived with the Ward family. About nine years after marriage Mr. 
Bratton bought eighty acres where he now lives in Section 29, Walnut town- 
ship. Remaining on the Ward farm about six years longer, he moved to the 
place where he has since resided, buying forty acres about 1900, in addition 
to his former purchase, making his holdings now aggregate one hundred and 
twenty acres of good land, well improved and under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. 

Politically, Mr. Bratton is a Republican, and he takes an active interest 
in party afifairs. He was trustee of Walnut township from 1905 to 1909, 
and has been twice on the township advisory board. In 19 12 he was nom- 
inated for county commissioner, but it was a bad year for his party, the 
whole ticket being defeated. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias at 
Mace, in which lodge he was Master of Exchequer for twenty years. He also 
belongs to the Tribe of Ben-Hur, the Modem Woodmen, and, religiously, 
the Presbyterian church. Mrs. Bratton is also a member of the Presbyterian 
church and of the Tribe of Ben-Hur. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bratton, namely : Ralph, 
born November 14, 1887, married Bessie Linn, and lives near Mr. Bratton's 
place in \\^alnut township, on a farm; Sherman is a veterinary surgeon and 
is practicing his profession at Walton, Cass county: Raymond is at home 
with his parents; Rulifif, now nine years old, is attending the district school. 
The other children all attended business college; Sherman was graduated in 
April, 1912, from McKillip Veterinary College, and has been very successful 
in the practice, getting a good start. 



LEANDER M. TRIBBY. 

Leander J\I. Tribby, a leading agriculturist of Coal Creek township, 
Montgomery county, may well be classed among the representative farmers, 
to whose ambition, energy and intelligence much of our national prosperity is 
due. In all his transactions the worthy gentleman of whom we write has 
always displayed a scrupulous regard for the rights of others, has never been 
known to wilfully wrong or defraud another, and his reputation is unspotted 
ni financial circles. He gives intelligent heed to politics and other questions 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. III5 

affecting the general good of his township and county and has long been re- 
garded as a leader in local affairs. He is a gentleman of genial address and 
exemplar)' habits and, like most all the natives of the Blue Grass region, is a 
courteous and well-mannered gentleman, taking a delight in contributing to 
the happiness and well being of his neighbors and friends, and he also takes a 
delight in keeping untarnished the excellent name which the Triljby family 
has ever borne. 

Mr. Tribby was born on December 28, 1848 in Kentucky, and there he 
spent his early boyhood years, being twelve years of age, when, in i<S6o, he 
accompanied his parents from his nati\e state to ^Montgomery county, Indi- 
ana, and here he has since been content to reside. He is a son of William 
and Mahala (Myers) Tribby. The father was born in Kentucky, and there 
he grew to manhood, was educated and spent most of his life, living only two 
years after coming to Indiana, his death occurring here in September, 1862. 
He devoted his life to farming for the most part, however, he was a carpenter 
by trade at which he worked in connection with farming. The mother of 
our subject was also born in Kentucky, and there grew to womanhood and 
received a common school education. 

To William Tribby and wife were born seven children, three of whom 
are still living. 

Leander M. Tribby grew to manhood on a farm and during the winter 
months he attended the common schools in his neighborhood. 

On September 29, 1896, Mr. Tribby was married to Mrs. Margaret 
(Wilson) Patton, who had been previously married. She was a daughter of 
John and Nancy Coons, mentioned elsewhere in this \olume. The wife of 
our subject was born on March 21, 1862. She was reared on the home farm 
and was educated in the common schools. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Tribby one child was born, Gaylord Tribby, whose 
birth occurred on October 6, 1898. 

Mr. Tribby began farming for himself early in life and he soon had a 
good foothold, and succeeding years has found him further advanced until he 
is today one of the successful and well known general fanners and stock 
raisers of the northwestern part of the county. He is the owner of a finely 
improved and highly cultivated farm of two hundred and twenty- four acres 
in Coal Creek township. His fields are well-tilled, well fenced and other- 
wise in up-to-date condition. On the place stands a splendid set of outbuild- 
ings, including a commodious and neatly furnished residence whicli ^Mr. 
Tribby himself built. It is in the midst of attractive surroundings. 



IIl6 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Politically, Mr. Tril3l>y is a Democrat and he has always been more or 
less active in local public affairs, and he served his township very acceptably 
as supervisor in 1908. Fraternally, he belongs to the Knights of Pythias at 
the town of New Richmond, and in religious matters he holds membership 
with the Methodist Episcopal church. 



JOHN M. WHITE. 



Biography, more than anything else, commands the most interested at- 
tention for the reason that it is a record of those who, in times gone by, trav- 
eled the thorny pathway of life as companions, accpaintances, friends or rela- 
tives. To preserve from forgetfulness the simple story of their experiences 
and record their acts, however uneventful, is a task attended with much pleas- 
ure to the writer and fraught with great good to humanity. Especially is this 
the case when the subject has passed the allotted three score and ten and, like 
some grand old forest trees, its companions all gone — stands alone, crowned 
with the weight and honors of years, calmly awaiting the change that soon 
will cause its once proud form to lie as low as its fellows. 

One of the venerable citizens and successful farmers of Montgomery 
county is John M. White, of Ripley township, who was born in Covington, 
Fountain county, Indiana, December 25, 1838, a son of William B. and 
Elizabeth White, both natives of Tennessee. William White, the paternal 
grandfather, was a soldier in the war of 1812. He came to Sullivan county, 
Indiana, in 181 7, subsequently leaving there and moving to Fountain county, 
locating on Coal Creek, finally moving to Vermillion county, this state, where 
he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring there on January 10. 1847. 

The following children were born to William B. White and wife, named 
as follows: Albert F. is deceased; James A., Mandy Lorina is deceased; 
Horace H. is deceased; Elmira S., John M., of this review; Thomas Franklin 
is deceased; William Bloomer. 

John M. White received his education in the public schools, and he 
grew to manhood on the home farm, where he did his share of the work. 
Early in life he took up farming, which he has continued to the present time, 
being still active. He is now the owner of two hundred and eight acres of 
productive and well improved land, on which he has carried on general 
farming and stock raising with much success. 

Mr. White was married on September i, 1859, to Rena B. Wert, daugh- 




MR. AND MRS. JOHN M. WHITE 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 1117 

ter of David and Rebecca (Balse) Wert, and to this union five children were 
born, namely : Edgar and Aartm are both deceased ; Wilham E. is teaching 
in the .Manio schools : Alonzo lives in Waynetown, Indiana ; Jesse is teaching 
in tile university at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Tile wife and mother passed to her eternal rest on November lo. 1892. 
and on Feliruary j8. 1894, Mr. White married Emma Hatt, daughter of 
Joseph \'. and Mary (Keyes) Ilatt, the former a native of Ohio and the latter 
of Delaware; they are both now deceased. This last union of the subject and 
wife has been without issue. 

Politically, Mr. \\"hite is a Republican, but he has ne\-er held or sought 
l)ublic office. He is a member of the Christian church. 



JOHX P.ARKS K\'ERSOX. 

l-'ew residents uf .Montgumery cuunty arc as well and fa\i)rably known 
as the enterijrising farmer and reprcsentati\e citizen, liut now retired from 
acti\e labor, whose life story is hrieHy tuld in the following lines, and none 
stand higher than he in the esteem and confidence of the communit}- in 
which he resides and for the material advancement of which he has dexoted 
much of his time and influence. The family of which he is an honorable 
representative has been identified with the history of this section of the state 
for many years, his ancestors having come here in an early day and taken a 
prominent part in the uplmilding and dexelopment of the county. That the 
early settlers of Montgomery county and their descendants have done their 
work well goes without saying, and to them the present generation is in- 
debted for the present high standard of civilization and improvement w hich 
is everywhere in evidence throughout the county. The subject of this sketch, 
during his active years, took a prominent part in this work of develoi)nient, in 
which his efforts were rewarded with a due meed of success, and today, as 
he descends the western slope of life's journey, he can look back in pleasant 
retrospect over the trail of the past years, recalling with jjleasure the daxs 
when, as one of the sturdy band who were building a new country here in 
the West, he latored and toiled for the benefit of those who might come after 
him. He is now enjoying that rest which his former years of arduous toil 
so richly entitle him to. 

John Parks E\-erson was i)orn on ()ctol)er 30, 1841, on a farm in L'nion 
township. Montgomery county, Indiana, the place of his birth being now in- 



IIl8 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

eluded in the corporate limits of Crawfordsville. He is a son of George W. 
and Rachel (Hankins) Everson, and a grandson of Jacob Everson, who 
entered a tract of government land near Whitesville in an early day. George 
Everson was born probably in Pennsylvania, and lost his mother by death 
when he was quite young. From Pennsylvania he went to Butler county, 
Ohio, where he was married to Rachel Hankins. About 1832 he and his wife, 
together with his father, Jacob Everson, came to Montgomery county, George 
renting the Jonathan Powers farm, at the edge of Crawfordsville, and it 
was there that the subject of this sketch was born and reared. Crawfords- 
ville at that time was a very insignificant place, comprising a land office and 
a log court house, with a few stores and residences, the latter being of the 
primitive type common in those days. There was no market there for farm 
products, the farmer being compelled to take his stuff to Lafayette or Terre 
Haute. Settlers in this section at that time were far apart and wild animals, 
such as wild hogs, deer and wolves, were numerous and often a menace to 
the new settlements. U|>on the death of Jacob Everson, his son, George, 
bought the interests of the other heirs to the home farm which the former 
had entered near Whitesville, and on that place the subject of this sketch 
spent the last years of his young manhood. Only eight or ten acres of the 
tract were cleared when they went to li\'e on it, and this was the poorest and 
highest part of the farm. When the lowlands were cleared and drained they 
proved to be the richest and most producti\'e portion of the estate. There 
George Everson spent the rest of his days, his death occurring in 1887, when 
eighty-one years old. His wife had passed away in April, 1878. 

In the clearing, improving and cultivation of this farm. John P. Ever- 
son took an active and prominent part. In 1861 he was married, at which 
time he rented a farm near Wliitesville and began life on his own account. 
He was fairly successful in his efforts, continuing the pursuit of agriculture 
until 1880, when he quit farming and, buying a saw-mill at Whitesville, he 
was engaged in the lumber business there during the following seven years. 
He then sold out there and went to Crawfordsville, where for a number of 
years he was successfully engaged as a lumber buyer for several concerns. 
He devoted himself to this employment for about five years, at the end of 
which period he returned to Whitesville and resumed farming. In Novem- 
ber, 1905, Mr. and Mrs. Everson came to Scott township and have since 
then made their home with their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas J. Byrd. Mr. Everson is the owner of a small farm in Clark town- 
ship, this county, which he rents. 



.\K)\Tt;i).\ii:KV cdiNTN". ixni.wA. 1 1 19 

FratLTiially, Mr. l*I\erson lias l)een a iiK-mljcr nf tlio Indcpcndcnl Order 
of Odd J-'ellows for about thirty-tivc years, and he and liis wife arc earnest 
members of the Cliristian church at Ladot;a. For about thirty-five years 
Air. Everson was a member of the Indiana Horse Thief Detective .\ssocia- 
tion, and as a captain of a sijuad he did much etTecti\e work for the asso- 
ciation. At one time he discovered a store being robbed and. ruunini; in. 
grabbed tlie burglar single-handed, and while struggling with iiini tiic owner 
of the store came in and shot the burglar dead. At anotiier time, wiiiie en- 
gaged in the capture of a thief, eighteen sliots were fired. He had many 
other exciting and often dangerous experiences while engaged in the woric 
of the association and was consideretl one of the most courageous and efti- 
cient members. 

In 18O1 John P. Everson was united in marriage witli Reltecca A. ('.un- 
tie, who was born near Whitesville, L'nion township, Montgomer\- countv, 
the daughter of George Guardian Guntle antl Rebecca .\. (Bailev) Guntle. 
Her father, who was born in Little York, Pennsylvania, was a son of Jona- 
than and Julia Ann (Sneivley) Guntle, natives of Germany, who, to pay for 
their passage across the ocean to this country, were put on the auction block 
and their services for three months sold to the highest bidder. George G. 
and Rebecca Guntle came to Montgomery county in 1832, traveling in a 
wagon, and locating near Whitesville on the 5th of September. Here Air. 
Guntle en.tered a tract of government land, on which not a stick had ever been 
disturbed, and here Mr. Guntle at once entered upon the task of creating a 
home in the wilderness. While he was getting a sjjace cleared for a cabin, 
the family lived in their wagon, not ha\ing even a bedstead. When tlie cabin 
logs were in place, the cracks between were filled w ith mud, anrl in this [irimi- 
tive home they began life, their experiences being much the same as those of 
other pioneers in this new country. There these parents spent the remainder 
of their days, aiid it was in this humble home that Mrs. Everson was born 
and reared, six children having been born to her parents before thev came 
to this countrv-. To Mr. and Mrs. Everson were born five children, namely : 
James W., Isom and Joseph E. are living; Charles A. died at Hoojicston, 
Illinois, in May, 1903, leaving a widow and eigiit children, who now make 
their home at Hammond, Indiana; Hattie B. is the wife of Thomas J. P,yrd. 
of Scott township, with whom Mr. and Mrs. Everson make their home and 
who is mentioned elsewhere in this work. 

In 191 1 Mr. and Airs. Everson celebrated the golden anniversarv of the 
marriage, and it was an enjoyable occasion, a large number of guests being 



I 120 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

present to offer their congratulations to their old friends. Mr. and Mrs. 
Everson both enjoy excellent health, retaining to a remarkable degree their 
physical and mental faculties. Because of their sterling (|uaUties of charac- 
ter, tliey are held in the highest esteem throughout the community which has 
been honored by their residence for so many years. 



DANIEL SMITH. 



Among the venerable farmers of Montgomery county, no one is more 
worthy of a place in her chronicles than is the gentleman of \vhom this is a 
life record, as he is a member of a family whose history has been closely 
connected with that of this region for more than half a century. Daniel 
Smith, of Ripley township, who has attained the advanced age of eighty- 
three years, has proved a very useful acquisition to the citizenship of the 
count}- since he took up his abode here, his ability as a farmer making him a 
valuable assistant in maintaining and extending the most important of the 
industries of this region. He is a self-made man in the broadest sense of the 
word and the architect of his own fortune. He has been a resident of the 
Wabash Valley country for many decades, and during that time has been one 
of the chief promoters of its upward progress, laboring harmoniously with 
other co-workers in the march of improvements, and winning, in his efforts 
for the common good, the esteem of the community by whom he has been 
surrounded, and he in every way is deserving of the high regard in which he 
is universally held, for his life had been carefully lived with regard to right 
and wrong, and he has been helpful to his neighbors. 

Mr. Smith was born in the state of Ohio, on December i, 1827. He is a 
son of Solomon and Jane (Marshall) Smith. Th father of the subject was a 
farmer all his life, and he settled in Ohio in a very early day. His family 
consisted of six children, of whom Daniel, of this review, is the only one 
living. 

Daniel Smith grew to manhood on the home farm, and there worked 
hard when a boy, for the sons of all pioneers had plenty to do in developing 
the virgin soil and winning a living from resisting Nature. He had scarcely 
any opportunity to obtain an education, schools being scarce in his time and 
were taught only a few months in the winter time. However, later in life, 
he read extensively and became a well informed man on current topics. 

On November i, 1857, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Catherine 



AtONTc;O.MKRV CorXTV, IN'DIAXA. I 121 

Thomas, who was born in Ohio April 17, 1838. Siie proxed to be a very 
faithful helpmeet, and she was called to her eternal rest on April 17, 1905. 

Seven children were born to Daniel Smith and wife, five of wliom are 
still living, namely : Edward, How^ard, Hamlet, Lenley, who is postmaster at 
Alamo, this county ; Daniel is deceased ; George is also deceased ; and Estella, 
the 3'oungest, married Hari'y Cheney, and they have one child, Ruth. They 
live with the subject and Estella keeps house for her father. 

Mr. Smith learned the carpenter's trade when a young man, and he be- 
came a very skilful workman, his services being in great demand. He fol- 
lowed his trade until he was fifty years old, when he turned his attention to 
agricultural pursuits, purchasing the farm which he still owns in Ripley town- 
ship, and here he has become quite well established, and has engaged suc- 
cessfully in general farming and stock raising. He is the owner of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, well improved and under a fine state of cultivation, Mr. 
Smith having made all the improvements himself. He has a pleasant home 
and good outbuildings. His land is all tillable, and it has been so well looked 
after that it has retained its original fertility and strength of soil. Although 
now one of the patriarchs of the country, he is comparatively well preserved, 
and looks after his farm and live stock in a general way. He attributes his 
long life and his health to steady and temperate habits and right thinking. 
He first came to Montgomery county in 1835, and since then has been one 
of our most enthusiastic citizens, and has lived the life of a good citizen in 
every respect. 

Politically, Mr. Smith is a Republican; however, he has never been 
much of a worker politically. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic Order 
at Alamo, and he is a member of the Presbvterian church. 



ED. T. McCREA. 



The gentleman of whom tlie biographer now writes is widely known as 
one of the honored citizens of ]\Iontgomery count\-. for Mr. McCrca lias been 
actively identified with the agricultural interests of Coal Creek township for 
many years and has been interested in public affairs. His well directed 
efiforts in the practical things of life, his capable management of his own busi- 
ness interests and his sound judgment have brought to him prcjsjjerit} , and 
his life demonstrates what may be accomplished by a man of energy and am- 
bition who is not afraid of work and has the aml>ition to continue Jiis labors, 
(70 



1 122 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

even in the face of seemingly discouraging circumstances. Mr. McCrea has 
been content to spend his long life in the Hoosier state, and he is truly a pro- 
duct of piuneer days, for having been born here more than three quarters 
of a century ago, he has li\ed through the wonderful epoch of change that 
has taken place, and he recalls many interesting incidents of his earlv life in 
the woods when practically even-thing was different from what it is today. 
He is now living practically retired from the acti\e duties of life, merel}' o\er- 
seeing his fine farm in a general way, the actual work being done by renters, 
and his declining years are singularly free from wants and cares. He is one 
of our honored \eterans of the Ci\ il war that rendered conspicuous service 
to the Union. 

Ed. T. McCrea was born on April 20, 1836 in Shelby county, Indiana. 
He is a son of John and Elizabeth (Templeton) McCrea. The father was 
born in the state of New York in 1787, and his death occurred in Indiana 
on March 18, 1859. He was a tanner by trade, and he also followed farming. 
He spent his early life in his nati\e state, finally remo\ing to Shelby county, 
Indiana, where lie estahlished the future home of tlie family. The mother 
of our suliject was born in 1805, and her death occurred in March, 1852. 
Ten children were lK)rn to John and Elizabeth McCrea, six of whom are still 
living. 

Ed. T. McCrea grew to manhood in Shelby county. thi§ state, assisting 
with the general work about the place, and he received a common school edu- 
cation. On July 30, 1867 he was united in marriage to Jessie L. Draper, 
who was born on February 22, 1846. She is still living. 

Three children have been born to our subject and wife, namely : Edward 
H., who is the possessor of rare natural talent as a musician, lives at home: 
William, who married ]\Iary Copeland lives in Greentown, above Koroma : 
John married Mary A. Hadley, and they live in Coal Creek township, this 
county. 

Mr. McCrea worked with his father in the tanning business for some 
time when a young man, later launching out in the general merchandise busi- 
ness which he was engaged in at the commencement of the Civil war. He 
gladly left a growing business and the comforts of home and went out amid 
the horrors of war in order to do what he could toward suppressing the 
hosts of treason, and he endured the hardships of camp, march and battle. 
On August 28, 1 861 he enlisted in Company D, Thirty-third Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, at Shelbyville, and was at once elected captain of that company. 
He served in Kentucky and Tennessee, then from Cumberland Gap returned 



MOXTllOMKKN' C(>L■^'T^■, INDIANA. ■ I -.1 

back north to the Oliio river. He was cii.^ai^ccl in tit"ty-ti\c hattles and 
skirmishes. J [e was honorahly discharged on Septeniher \(\ iS()4. Iia\ in^ 
proved, accorchn.i^ to his comrades, a \ery I'aitiifnl soldier for the ,i^ii\ernment. 

After his career in tlie army Mr. McCrea reliUMied to Indiana and took 
uj) i^eneral farming and stock raising, making a .specialty at one time of 
Pokingus Black cattle, he having been the first man in i\!ontgomer\' county 
that raised this popular breed for sale, and he became 
way. Owing to the superior grade of his cattle the> 
market. 

Mr. McCrea is now the owner of one of the linesl 
townshi]), consisting of one hundred and si.xty acres, a 
high state of impro\'ement. He ga\e each of his childi 
one time owned four lumdred acres. He is now reti' 
land. 

Politically, he is a Progressive and is much interested in the new move- 
ment. He has long taken a leading interest in pujjlic affairs, and has wielded 
a potent influence for good in his locality in a ci\il way. He was a trustee 
in his county for one term, and was a representative to the legislature two 
terms, during which he did much for the permanent good of his locality and 
won the hearty commendation of his constituents. Fraternall}-, he belongs 
to the Masonic Order at Xew Richmond. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal clnuxh, Ijeing a trustee in the same. 



Aidely known 


in this 


found a very 


read)- 


farms in Coal 


Creek 


tillable and u 


nder a 


.'U forty acres 


and at 


ed and rents ( 


mt his 



EDWARD S. MILLER. 

A representative young farmer of Madison township, Montgomery 
county, who is succeeding at his chosen life work l^ecause he is willing to 
work hard and persistently and deal honestly with his fellow men. He is 
quick to adopt any new method pertaining to his work. He is the scion of 
one of the honored and well known old families of this locality, and he has 
ever made an effort to keep the good name of the same untarnished. 

Mr. Miller was born in Alontgomery county, Indiana, May 24. 1878. 
He is a son of David S. and Sarah Miller. These parents were both natives 
of the state of Pennsylvania, where they grew to maturit\-, recei\ed their 
educational training in the old-fashioned .schools and tliere were married. 
They came to Montgomery count}', Indiana, in an early day and settleil in 



I 124 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Madison township, wliere they developed a good farm and here they are still 
living, being" now advanced in years. 

Eight children were born to David S. Miller and wife, four of whom are 
still living. 

Edward S. Miller, of this review, grew to manhood in his native locality 
and assisted with the general work on the home place, and received his edu- 
cation in the common schools, then took up general fanning and is still 
actively engaged, having become very well established. 

Mr. Miller was married on December 25, 1892, to Maud Weller, daugh- 
ter of John T. and Mina (Lynch) Weller. Her father was a native of In- 
diana, and her mother was born in Ireland, from which country she emi- 
gratgd to the United States when young in years, and here she met ad mar- 
ried Mr. Weller. They settled in Union township, Montgomery county, in 
an early day, and here they became well established through their industry 
and spent the rest of their lives here. Their family consisted of three chil- 
dren, two of whom are still living. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Miller, namely: Stanley 
and Dorothy, both at home. 

Mr. Miller has never taken an active part in public afifairs and has never 
held office. Eraternally, he belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons and the 
Independent Order of Odd Eellows. both at Linden. Religiously, he is a 
member of the Methodist church. 



CAPT. HENRY H. TALBOT. 

The respect which should always be accorded the brave sons of the North 
who left their homes and the peaceful pursuits of civil life to give their 
services, and their lives if need be, to preserve the integrity of the Union 
is certainly due Capt. Henry H. Talbot, one of the successful agriculturists 
and esteemed citizens of Montgomery county. He proved his love and 
loyalty to the government on the long and tiresome marches in all kinds of 
situations, exposed to summer's withering heat and winter's freezing cold, 
on the lonely picket line a target for the bullets of the unseen foe, on the 
tented field and amidst the flame and smoke of battle, where the rattle of the 
musketry mingled with the terrible concussion of the bursting shell and the 
deep diapason of the cannon's roar made up the sublime but awful chorus of 
death. To the heroes of the "grand ami}-" all honor is due: to them the 



MONTGOMERY COLNTV, IN'niANA. I 123 

country is uiuler a debt of gratitmlc which it cannot i)ay, and in centuries yet 
to be posterity will commemorate their ciiivalry in fitting eulogy and tell their 
knightly deeds in story and song. To this rapidly vanishing host into the 
phantom army of the silent land belongs the gentleman whose name appear?, 
at the head of this article, still left with us to thrill us with reminiscences of 
those stirring times of the early sixties. 

Capt. Talbot was born at Lexington, Fayette count}-. Kentucky, Septem- 
ber 6, 1841. He is a son of Courtney and Elizabeth (Harp) Talbot. The 
father was born on September 3, 1804 in Bourbon county, Kentucky, and 
the mother was born in Fayette county, that state, on July 14, 1813. Nicholas 
Talbot, the paternal grandfather, was born in Virginia, November 10, 1781. 
John Kennedy, the great grandfather of our subject, was born October 16, 
1742, and he served in the Revolutionary war. Cai)t. Talbot has a copy taken 
from record for a grant of land of two tliousand and se\en hundred acres 
located on Kennedy's creek, Bourbon county, Kentucky. It was issued in 
favor of his great grandfather, John Kennedy, ami liis brother Joseph Ken- 
nedy, the same land being located and surveyed by Alaj. Daniel Roone, Octo- 
ber 16, 1779. 

Capt. Talbot received such education as the early times in which he was 
a boy afforded, and early in life he took up farming which he has always 
followed, and he is now the owner of a large, productive and finely improved 
farm near Crawfordsville on which he has long carried on general farming 
and stock raising on an extensive scale. He has always taken a great deal of 
interest in preparing a good grade of li\e stock for the market. He has a 
pleasant home in the midst of attractive surroundings, and it is his intention 
to spend the rest of his days amid rural scenes, being a great lover of nature 
in all her forms and it is his hope that his last \'iew of earth will lie on wa\ ing 
grain fields and blooming meadow lands. 

While his father was the owner of many slaves, Captain Talbot enlisted 
for service in the Federal army in the first call for three months' troops at the 
outbreak of the war. Later, as a member of Company C. Seventh Kentucky 
Cavalry, on June i, 1862, he saw much hard service, but, according to his 
comrades, he proved to be faithful and gallant no matter how arduous or 
dangerous the tasks assigned him. His first battle was at Richmond, Ken- 
tucky, August 30, 1862, and afterwards he was in scores of battles and skirm- 
ishes, his hardest service being against Longstreet around Knoxville, Tenn- 
essee, in the winter of 1863-64. He participated in the Atlanta campaign, 
and was in the great Wilson cavalry raid, which started from Eastport, 



11-26 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mississippi, and the regiment to which our subject belonged found itself in 
Florida at the end of that undertaking. Our subject was in the last battle of 
the war at Westpoint, Georgia, April i6, 1865. For meritorious conduct he 
was twice promoted, first to second lieutenant and secondly, to the captaincy 
of his regiment, and as an officer he won the confidence and respect of his 
men and superior officers. During his military career he was twice wounded, 
once through the right breast and once through the right leg. He was 
mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee, July 17, 1865. Captain Talbot was the 
only one of his family in Kentucky to join the Union army, others of his 
relatives joining the Confederate army. 

After his career i nthe army Captain Talbot returned home, and resumed 
farming, later coming to Montgomery county. Indiana, where he has since re- 
sided. He was married on June 6, 1872 to Hettie A. Evans, daughter of 
Rev. Samuel and Mary (Woodrufif) Evans, of Waveland, Indiana. To this 
union the following children were born : May Wood Talbot and Ethel Talbot 
Sparks, the last named is the widow of the late ^^'allace Sparks, formerly 
clerk of Montgomery county. 

Captain Talbot has been a Republican for the past fifty years, however 
in the campaign of '1912 he allied himself with the Progressi\-e party under 
Colonel Roosevelt. He has served one term as county councilman. 

Captain Talbot is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and 
he served two terms as post commander of McPherson Post, No. 7, at Craw- 
fordsville. Fraternally, he belongs to. the Masonic Order, having been a 
Mason for the past fifty years, holding membership with Montgomery Lodge, 
No. 50. He is a member of the Rural Detectives, and in this organization 
he had the honor of constructing its secret work. 



ED. LAWERENCE. 



Montgomery county can boast of few more progressive and successful 
agriculturists, stock dealers and business men than the well known gentleman 
whose name furnishes the caption of this review. He has long been con- 
sidered one of the leading farmers of Browns A'alley and as a citizen is in- 
telligent and enterprising, combining within himself those sterling qualities 
of manhood that make not only a useful meml^er of society, but a leader m 
whatever he undertakes. He has ever had an honest determination of pur- 
pose and an obliging nature which impels him to assist others on the higli- 



MOXTCOMKRV CorXTV, IN'DIAXA. 112^ 

way of life while niakiiii; jilain the path of ])rnsi)erity for himself and family. 
He is a i)uhlie-s])irite>l man and has nnt withheld his aid fmm any wnrlliy 
muxentent ha\ inj;- for its dhject the ,s;eneral impn ixemenl nf his tnwushij) 
and CMunt\-. 

Mr Lawerence is the scion oi a fine old Southern family, many of whose 
winniniL; ])ersonal attributes he seems to have inherited, lie was horn jnl\ 
7. 1857 in Montgomery county, X'irginia, and there he ,i;rew to manhood, 
received his educational training and remained in the ( )ld Dominion until he 
was twenty years old when he came to Indiana where he has since reniained. 
He is a son of Francis W. and (".ertrude ((irills) Lawerence, hoth natives of 
Virginia, the father's hirth having occurred in March. iSjfi, and he died in 
October, 1895; the mother was bom in 1828, and her death occurred in 1884. 
The father of our subject was a carpenter by trade. His family consisted of 
eight children, five of whom are still living. 

Ed. Lawerence, of this sketch, was married on August i, 1880, "In Martha 
A. Bennett, a native of Indiana. Her death occurred on February 15, 1890. 
On Noveniljer 26th of that year, Mr. Lawerence married Kate Armstrong, 
who was born in Montgomery county, this state, and here she grew to woman- 
hood and was educated. She is a daughter of a highly respected old family. 

Four children constituted our subject's family, two of whom arc still liv- 
ing. One of these children was liy the first wife, the other three by the sec- 
ond. Thev were named: Frank, who is deceased: W'illa is li\ing at home; 
Marv Fern and Forest E., twins, the latter being deceased. 

;\lr. Lawerence began life for himself as a farmer and this he has con- 
tinued to follow to the present time in connection with the stock and grain 
business, in all of which he has been very successful. He was located at the 
town of New Market, shipping cattle, hogs and shee]). and buying and selling 
grain. He built up a very extensive business and is widely known all over 
this section of the .state. He is the owner of two hundred and forty acres 
of fine land in Brown township, all tillable but about thirt\-two acres. It is 
well tiled, in fact, modernly improved in e\ery way, ami on the ])lace stand a 
substantial and convenient set of buildings. 

Mr. Lawerence in his fraternal relations is a member of the Masonic 
Order at Waveland. the Independent Onler of Odd Fellows at Xew Market. 
Politically, he is a Democrat and he has long been an influential factor in 
local political affairs, lieing a leader in his part. He was elected sheriff of 
Montgomery county in 1906. and served in that capacity for a period of four 
years in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent 



1 128 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

satisfaction of all concerned, irresi>ecti\e of party alignment, in fact, accord- 
ing to the consensus of opinion he proved to be one of the most faithful and 
popular officials the county has ever known. He looked after the interests 
of the people v^'ith just the same care and sound discretion that has always 
characterized his personal life. No shadow of suspicion ever rested on his 
official record, and he fearlessly and impartially discharged his duties under 
the law, as he saw and understood the right. Personally, he is a man of pleas- 
ing address, genial, obliging and neighborly, and he has so ordered his every- 
day life that he has won the confidence and good will of all with whom he 
has come into contact. 



CHARLES TINSLEY BRONAUGH, M. D. 

The writer of biography dealing in the personal liistory of men engaged 
in the various afifairs of everyday life, occasionally finds a subject whose rec- 
ord commands exceptional interest and admiration and especially is this true 
when he has achieved more than ordinai-y success or made his influence felt 
as a leader of thought and a benefactor of his kind. Dr. Charles Tinsley 
Bronaugh, of New Ross, Montgomery county, is eminently of that class who 
earn the indisputable right to rank in the van of the army of progressive men 
by reason of a long and strenuous career devoted to the good of his fellows, 
to the alleviation of their physical sufferings, he occupies a position of wide 
influence and has made a name during his more than a quarter of a century 
of practice in Walnut township which will long live in the hearts of the people. 
During the latter decades of the period of development of this section he has 
been not only a successful practitioner, but has aided in whatever way possible 
for the betterment of the condition of the people, and his name has become a 
household word throughout the locality. 

Dr. Bronaugh was born in Gerard county, Kentucky, March 19, 1854. 
He is a son of Robert N. and Mary (Taylor) Bronaugh. The father was 
born in 1819 in Hendricks county, Indiana, and there also, in the same year, 
the mother was bom. They both grew to maturity in their native county and 
received common school educations, and there they were married, subse- 
quently removing to Kentucky where they resided until 1863 when they moved 
back to Lizton, Hendricks county, where they spent the rest of their lives. 
Their family consisted of seven children, namely: Elizabeth C. is the eldest; 
Nancy, George T., are both deceased: Charles T.. of this review; Mary V., 
John W. are both deceased ; James is the youngest. 




DR. CHAS. T. BRONAtTGH 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. II29 

Dr. Bronaugh was educated in the coninion schools of Hendricks 
county, and early in life he determined upon a medical career and began to 
prepare for the same, subsequently entering the Indiana College of Medicine 
at Indianapolis from which he was graduated with the class of 1884, and he 
at once began practicing at the village of New- Ross, Montgomery county, 
remaining here continuously to the present time, building up a very extensive 
and lucrative practice during this period of nearly thirty years. 

The doctor was married in 1889 to Sadie Everson, daughter of James 
K. and Hannah Everson. Hers is one of the oldest and best known families 
of the county. The death of Mrs. Bronaugh occurred in 1890, without issue. 

Politically, Dr. Bronaugh is a Democrat. He held the office of county 
coroner for two terms in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself 
and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Rebekahs. 



ISAAC NEWTON MEHARRY. 

It has been well said l)y one of the great writers of (ilden times that the 
deeds of men live after them, so it is but just that the deeds of tlie man whose 
name heads this sketch should be remembered for the benefit of his posterity. 
His life was such that the future generations of the name will with pride 
read its history. He was a self-made man, possessing a large store of gen- 
eral knowledge and good business tact, and with a determination that was 
characteristic of the man, he set al)out when a l)oy making for liimself for- 
tune and an honored name at the same time. With industry for his motto, 
he plodded up the rugged hill that leads to success, and became one of the 
most substantial farmers and prosperous citizens in the northwestern part 
of Montgomery county, leaving behind him a large and valuable landed 
estate, but what is more to be appreciated by his family and descendants, 
the record of an honored life and untarnished name, Mr. Meharry liaving 
a number of years ago been gathered into the sheaves of that grim reaper 
who. in the lines of the poet Longfellow, "Reajjs the bearded grain at a 
breath and the flowers that grow between." The life of such a man lias a 
wholesome influence on the comunity whicii he lionored 1>\- his citizenship. 

Isaac Newton Meharry-, for many years a leading agriculturist of 
Montgomery county and the able president of tiie Farmers' Bank at Win- 



I 130 MONTGOMERY COUXTV, INDIANA. 

gate, was born 011 l*>briiary 16. 1842. at the home where liis widow now 
resides, near the town of W'ingate. Coal Creei< township, this county. He 
was a son of Thomas and Eunity ( Patton ) Meharr}-. Thomas Meharry 
was horn in Ohio and his wife in West Virginia, August 16. 1802. They 
were married in Brown county. Ohio. Deceml)er 4. 1827, where she had 
moved with her parents at the age of ten years. In the spring of 1828, 
they left the Buckeye state and came to Montgomery county, Indiana, here 
establishing the permanent liome of the family, developing a good farm by 
their industry and close application, and here they spent the rest of their 
lives, the father dying in 1874 and the mother's death occurred on August 7, 
1887, while on a visit in Fountain county. They were the parents of seven 
children, all now deceased but two daughters. Their children were named 
as follows ; Mrs. Jane P. Dick, of Tolono. Illinois ; William, who lived in 
Tolono, deceased; Mrs. Ellen Martin, of Attica. Indiana; Jesse, who lived 
at Tolono, Illinois, deceased: A. P., who also lived there, deceased; Isaac 
Newton, of this memoir, and Abraham T. were twins; the latter is also de- 
ceased. 

Isaac X. Meharry's career was somewhat unusual in that the place of 
his birth, his iiome during life, and the place of his death are located within 
the enclosure of his late home, and within a radius of twenty-five feet. He 
assisted with the general work on the home farm as he was growing to 
maturity, and in the winter months he attended the common schools, study- 
ing one year at Wesley Chapel ; in fact, it may be said that he remained a 
student the rest of his life, being a wide reader, and he became a well in- 
formed man. 

He was married to Mary Elizabeth Moore, September 16, 1863, and 
their married life proved to be one of continued happiness and sunshine. 
She was born on June 13. 1845, in Brown count}-, Ohio, and she was two 
years old when her parents brought her to Indiana, and here she grew to 
womanhood and received her education in the common schools. She has 
lived in the vicinity of Wingate since she was nine years of age. Her par- 
ents were Henry Wilson Moore and Maria (Davidson) Moore. They were 
the parents of four children, two of whom are still living. 

To Mr. and ^Irs. Meharry were born ten children, four of whom are 
still living, namely; Mrs. Effie Rebecca Meredith is living in Kansas; Etta 
Lulu is deceased; Annie Mary is living at home; Jennie M. married Charles 
Fraley and she is deceased ; John Abraliam. who married Jessie Carter, is 
living at Shawnee Mound. Indiana; Carrie M. is deceased; Vinton Switzer, 



MOXTGOMEin' COLXTV. IXDIAXA. i I 3 I 

tlie vinni'^fst child, is lixint;- at Ikhiic. 'I^lirec (itluTS. a hm- ami twin ilani^litcrs, 
died in infancy. 

Isaac Meharry devoted iiis life to a.t^ricultural jiursuits and stuck raisinj;' 
with ever-increasing success until he hecanie one of the leaders in his Noca- 
tion in this section of the county, and he left four hundred and fortx-funr 
acres of well improved and valualile land in Coal Creek township. This his 
widow still owns and it is being managed successfully. She has a large 
pleasant home and on the place is al.so a substantial and convenient set of c nit- 
buildings. At this home occurred the death of Governor Matthews. An 
excellent grade of li\e stock is ke])t at all seasons and a general farming 
business is carrietl on extensi\ely. 

The Council Gro\e Horse Thief Detective Association was organized 
in an okl locust gro\e (in Mr. Meharry"s farm, our subject hax'ing been one 
of its organizers, and he did much to make it successful. It was the first 
association organized in the L'nited States. Politically, he was a Republican, 
hut he was not in any sense a ])ublic man, being content to lead a (juiet life 
on his fine farm. 

We quote the following from a local news])aper, which is part of an ex- 
tended article on Mr. Meharry's death : 

"The death of Isaac N. Meharr\- occurred on December lo, 1904, at the 
age of sixty-two years, nine months and twenty-six days. Mr. Meliarry was 
con\-erted and joined the Methodist Episcopal church at Shawnee Mound 
under the pastorate of Rev. S. P. Colvin, during a series of meetings in Janu- 
ary, iS^o and since that time he lix'ed a useful, true and exemplar}- Christian 
life. 

"He was a trustee and steward of Shawnee church for al)out twenty 
years continuously. As a husband he was true and faithful. As a father he 
was loving and kind and good in the truest sense. As a citizen he was honor- 
able, trustworthy, upright and public-spirited. The people knew him as a 
warm-hearted, true and earnest man. 

"A man of strong friendships of a .strictly moral life. For many years 
he suffered from ill health, which interfered to some extent with his plans 
and desires. He was ]iresident of the l~armer's liank at \\'ingate during the 
last two years of his life, holding that office at the time of his death. 

"The funeral services were held in the jiresence of a large circle of rela- 
tives and friends. The funeral decorations were many and beautiful. The 
body was laid to rest in the Meharry cemetery located on the farm on which 
he was born." 



1 132 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOHN W. MILLER. 

One of the leading citizens of New Ross and that section of Montgom- 
ery county who has done much for the development of the same and who has 
succeeded in various fields of endeavor is John W. Miller, trustee of his town- 
ship and a leader in the same in both a business and public manner. He is a 
man who has taken a great delight in the momentous changes that have been 
noted here since he was a boy, for he is one of our worthy native sons and 
has been content to spend his life in his native community, and, judging from 
the large success that has attended his efforts he has been wise in this, how- 
ever he would doubtless have succeeded in any locality where he might have 
cared to direct his energies, for he is by nature the possessor of those qualities 
that never fail to win in what the poets are pleased to call the battle of life. 

Mr. Miller was born at Ladoga, this county, on December 9, 1849. He 
is a son of Isaac N. and Nancy A. (Corn) Miller. The father was born in 
Greene county, Ohio, September 13, 1826, and the mother was a native of 
Montgomery county, Indiana, where her birth occurred on October 26, 1829. 
Her parents came from Shelby county, Kentucky, to Montgomery county, 
Indiana, as early as 1820 hence were among the first settlers, locating in Scott 
township. Isaac N. Miller came to this county in 1848 and settled at La- 
doga. He was a carpenter by trade which he followed here until 1856 when 
he moved into the woods in Walnut township where he cleared and improved 
a farm. 

Five children were born to Isaac N. Miller and wife, namely : John W., 
of this review; George A., Henry A., Albert A. is deceased; and Benjamin F. 

John W. Miller assisted his father with his work when he was growing 
to manhood and he received his education in the common schools, after which 
he spent a year in the Ladoga Seminary. He had decided upon a career as 
teacher and thus well equipped for the same he followed that laudable work 
two years, and although he was making an excellent start, he saw that his 
bent was in another direction, the school room being too confining, and he 
took up farming which he followed with ever increasing success until 1908, 
owning and operating one of the choice farms in this part of the county of 
which he made a pronounced success, both as a general farmer and stock 
raiser. Upon the last mentioned date he retired from the active duties of life 
and moved to the village of New Ross, where he owns a pleasant home and 
where he is spending his latter years in quiet. 

Mr. Miller was married in 1878 to Betty Hall, daughter of Harrison and 




JOHN W. MILLER 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. II33 

Catlierine (W'asson) Hall, both natives of Shelb}- county, Kentucky, where 
they spent their earlier _\ears, and from which they came to Alontt^oniery 
county, Indiana, in a very early day and settled in Brown township, where 
they spent the rest of their lives, becoming well located there. 

Two children were born to our subject and wiie. namely: Minnie May 
married Alta B. Mercer, of Clark township; and Nancy Catherine, who died 
on August 20, 1898. 

The wife and mother was called to her rest on October 21, 1898. 

Politically, Mr. Miller is a Republican. He has been trustee of Walnut 
township for the past five years, giving satisfaction to all concerned. Fra- 
ternally, he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge 
at New Ross, No. 397 ; and the Free and Accepted Masons at Crawfordsville. 
He and his family believed in the Baptist creed. He is a member of the 
board of directors of the Farmers and Merchants Bank of Ladoga. 



HENRY C. ^IcGAUGHFA'. 

While Henry C. McGaughey, of Brown townshi]), Montgomery county, 
does not farm on as extensive a scale as some of his neighbors, yet it is safe 
to say that none of the tillers of the soil in the southern part of the county 
are getting greater returns for the labor expended on their land than he. In- 
stead of hurriedly and carelessly operating over a ^•ast acreage, as some farm- 
ers do, he believes in smaller acreage tended well, and therefore devotes his 
careful attention to what land he has, making every foot produce something, 
without waste; but he does not deplete the strength of soil thereby, rotating 
his crops and building up his land, so that on the contrary, its value has in- 
creased, and he is making a very comfortable living. 

Mr. ]\IcGaughey was born on December 4, 1854, in Putnam county, 
Indiana, and there he grew to manhood, assisted with the general work on 
the home farm when a boy, and received his education in the common schools, 
continuing to reside there until he removed to Brown township, Montgomery 
county, about twelve years ago. He is a son of Michael and Sarah (Lane) 
McGaughey. The father was born in Kentucky in 1804, and his death oc- 
curred in 1856 in Putnam county, this state, having come there from the Blue 
Grass country in an early day and devoted himself to farming. He died in 
the prime of life. His family consisted of twehe children, nine of whom are 
still living. 



lI34 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Henry C. McGaughey was married on I-'elirnary 24, 1882. to Martha 
E\erman, who was horn in Putnam county. Indiana. Xovemher 12. 1859, 
and tliere she grew to womanhood and received a good common schooPedu- 
cation. She is a daughter of James and Sarah ( Norman ) Everman. These 
parents were both natixes of Inchana. 

To Mr. and Mrs. McGaughey have i:)een born eight children, six of wliom 
are still living, namely: Leona, born December 31, 1882, married Claude 
Jai-vis, and they live in Parke county, Arthur, born March 9, 1884, has re- 
mained single, and he is a promising young attorney of Crawfordsville; 
William, born March 13, 1886, married Edna Sewell, and they live in Mont- 
momery county; Everett, burn July 3, 1889, died January 28, 1893: Edith, 
born January 14, 1891, has remained single and is at home with her parents; 
Celia, born March 25, 1893, died January 31. 1895: Raymond, born August 
16, 1895 is engaged in farming; Inez, l)orn January 13. 1899. is attending 
school. 

Mr. McGaughey has devoted his life to general farming and stock rais- 
ing. He is the owner of eighty acres of good land in Brown township, which 
he keeps well improved and which is fairly well tiled. It is all under a high 
state of cultivation with the exception of about ten acres which is kept in 
pasture. 

Politically. Mr. McGaughey is a Progressive, and has kept well informed 
on public matters. In religious affairs he belongs to the Christian churcli. 



TAMES D. WILSON. 



The agricultural districts of the great commonwealth of Indiana are the 
homes of wortliy men whose li\'es have been spent in such a manner as to win 
the respect of those with whom they associate, while their well-directed efforts 
have resulted in comfortable homes and many enjoyments. In Montgomery 
county frequent representatives of this class may 'be found, and one of them 
is he whose life history is briefly outlined in these paragraphs. James D. 
Wilson's home is located in Coal Creek township where he has a thoroughly 
tilled farm, whereon may be found such buildings as are made necessary to 
the extent of his work, or such as will increase the comfort of his home life. 
He owes his present prosperity solely to his own industiy, and in his career 
he has shown himself possessed of those faculties that are requisite to suc- 
cess — sagacity, far-reaching forethought and a practical tenacity of purpose. 



iMOXTGOMEUV rOl-NTN', INDIANA. II35 

.Mr. Wilson was horn in Montgomery connly on ()ctol)LT .:;(). 1S34, ami 
here he lias been content to spend his life, lielie\ing that near his own home 
exist opportunities as good if not better than exist for him elsewhere. Ik 
is a son of W. W. and Sophia ( Mc(iinnis) Wilson. These parents were both 
natives of the state of Ohio, however, they both came to Indiana when six 
years okl with their parents who settled in Montgomery county, the McChnnis 
family locating in Craw fordsville in a \ei"y early day. The parents of our 
subject grew to maturit_\- in this count}-, were etlucated and married here, and 
here the_\' spent their li\es on a farm, liecoming well estalilished through their 
industry. Eight children were born to them, named as follows: Albert M., 
who was the eldest; James D., of this sketch: Theodore E.. bAelyn, Harriet 
M., William H., Etta Alice and Lafayette D. 

James D. Wilson grew to manhood in his nati\e community and receixed 
his education in the common schools, later entering Stockwell Academy. He 
applied himself assiduously to his text-books and made an excellent record. 
Aftter leaving school he began life for himself In- teaching, which \'ocation he 
followed successfully for a period of seven years, giving eminent satisfaction 
to both pupils and patrons, and his ser\-ices were in great demand. He ilid 
much to impro\e the educational conditions in the public schools of the 
county and became well known locally in this field of endeavor. But finally 
tiring of this line of work he turned his attention to farming and is still actix'e. 
He has been very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser and has be- 
come well established. 

Mr. Wilson was married in 1879 to Mary J. McClamrock, daughter of 
James and Hannah (Breaks) McClamrock. Her father was a native of 
Hamilton county, Ohio, and the mother was born in Montgomery county. 
Indiana, her parents having been very early settlers in this locality. Mrs. 
W^ilson was reared to womanhood and educated in her nati\e commmiitx-. 

Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, namely: Ethel mar- 
ried Frank Chadwick. and they live in Coal Ireek township: Stella lives at 
home; Ralph, who was killed on October 23, 19 10, in a football game in St. 
Louis, in a game between a St. Louis team and the Wabash College team, 
of Crawfordsville, Indiana. He was considered one of the fa.stest and most 
capable half-backs in the state at the time of his death. He was a young man 
of much promise and was popular. 

Mr. Wilson has long been active in local puliHc afifairs, and he is at 
present trustee of Coal Creek township, antl he was formerly county com- 
missioner for two terms. As a i)ublic servant he gi\es eminent satisfaction 



1 136 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to all concerned, being faithful and honest in the discharge of his duty. 
Fraternally, he belongs to the Knights of Pythias, in which he is active and 
influential. In religious matters he belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church 
and is at present a trustee in the same. 



GEORGE HENRY COOK. 

Success has come to George Henry Cook, farmer and stock raiser of 
Sugar Creek township, Montgomery county, because he has sought it along 
legitimate lines and has not loitered about waiting for fate to bring him a 
fortune on a golden platter, as it seems many of the ambitionless are doing. 
He was taught early in life that all labor is noble and that little is to be ex- 
pected in this world without effort, continuous and rightly directed, so he has 
never had any partitcular qualms of conscience when he has had a task to 
perform, whether trivial or important. Not only has he been taught to work 
when work was to be done, but to do well, his very best, whatever was 
worthy the attention at all. Thus it is not to be wondered at that he has suc- 
ceeded admirably at his chosen \ocation — that of agriculture — the noblest and 
most important of all vocations. 

Mr. Cook was born in this township and county on March 24, 1871. 
He is a son of W. H. and Nancy (Wyatt) Cook. The father was born in 
Clermont county, Ohio, January 17, 1833, and on September 7th in that year 
and state the mother was also born. There they grew to maturity, received 
limited educations in the common schools and there they were married ; but 
not long afterwards, in the fall of 1866, they removed to Montgomery 
county, Indiana, and here they became well established on a farm, and here 
the father is still living. The mother passed to her eternal rest December 11, 
1901. She was a native of the city of Cincinnati, and she became interested 
in church affairs when but a girl there, having joined the Methodist Episco- 
pal church when ten years of age. 

W. H. Cook was married a second time, his last wife being Emma 
Petro, who was a native of Montgomery county, and she is still living. 
Politically, Mr. Cook is a Republican, but has never been active in public life. 
His family consisted of ten children, all still living but one, named as follows : 
Edward A., John O. (deceased), William T., Eugene J., Grant W., Everett, 
Mrs. Hattie Schoen, George H. (of tliis sketch), !\Irs. Ellen Eppert. and 
Mattie. 




WM. H. AND NANCY COOK 




GEORGE H. COOK 



MONTC-.O.MKKV COIXTY, INDI.WA. I 1 37 

George H. Cook grew to maiilnnKl on the lioiiic farm, and tliere did his 
share of the general work wlien a Ixiy. lie received a good common school 
education, also attended hig1i schnol. lie has remained unmarried, and is 
living with his father on the lioniestead, successfully carrying on general 
farming and stuck raising. The place consists <>f une hundred and t\\ent\- 
acres, of which eighty is owned by the father and fnrty by the sun. It is all 
tillable but about five acres, which is in timber. This land was entered fnmi 
the government by our .subject's grandfather in 1N33. William (Unk. having 
invaded the wilds of this locality when it was little <le\el<i|)ed and here he 
develo])e(l a good farm through hard work, and frum that early dav tu the 
present time the Cooks have Ijeen well and favurably knnwn nwr this section 
of the comity. That this land has been ably manageil is seen from the fad 
that the soil is today as strong as it e\er was and bounteous crops are annually 
gathered. Our subject's father has made most of the im])ro\-ements now 
seen on the place. 

P'olitically, George H. Cook is a l\e])ublican. lie belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Xo. I4(), at narlington. and he has been 
secretary of the lodge for the past ten or twelve years, his long retention in 
this position being sufficient evidence of the trust reposed in him b\- his 
fellow citizens. He is a memlier of the Potato Creek Methodist Episcopal 
church and is assistant Sunday school superintendent there. 



S.AMUEL JOSEPH MILLIG.A.X. 

It is a pleasure to talk to Samuel josej)!! .Milligan and get his story of the 
pioneer coalitions of Brcnvn township. Montgonier_\- counly. Indi.ina, where 
his long, successful and u.seful life has Ijeen spent, for he was a pioneer child. 
growing u]) when the country was little impro\cd. when homes were widel\- 
separated, when there were no bridges across the dangerous streams and in- 
deed, ])ractieally no roads. It was the period ])efore the coming of the "iron 
trail." no shrill w-hi>tle of the locomotive being heard in the vast stretches of 
wildwdod, and it was a time when such lads a> lie had plenty of bard work 
to do in helping clear and develop the land. .Mr. .Milligan has always been 
a farmer and stock raiser and he has been successful, so that he is now 
enabled to li\e retired, enjoying the fruits of his former years of toil and good 
management. 
(72) 



I 138 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Milligan was born in Brown township, this county, on November 
18, 1841, and he is a son of John and Lucinda (Ehnore) Milhgan, the father 
a native of Pennsylvania and the mother of Montgomery county, Indiana, 
her family originally coming from South Carolina, and were early settlers 
of Crawfordsville and were well known for many decades here, being active 
in the early civilization of the county. John Milligan, mentioned above, was 
a young man when he left his Pennsylvania home and came to Cass county, 
Indiana, and from there later removed to Montgomery county, establishing 
his future home at Crawfordsville, where he taught school for several terms, 
becoming one of the popular early teachers in this section. Later he moved 
to Brown township, settling east of the village of Waveland, which had at 
that time, however, not been founded. Later he had the honor of laying out 
that town, and here he l>ecame a prosperous merchant, his store being patron- 
ized by the inhabitants for miles around, and he did much, in fact, more than 
anyone else in the early development of Waveland. He continued to follow 
merchandising until he retired from active life. He was a man of large 
public-spirit, and he was largely instrumental in putting the first railroad 
through this locality, and lie did many other things that he will always be 
honored for. 

The family of John Milligan consisted of nine children, namely: Ed- 
ward M., Matilda J., Sarah E., Thomas E., John W., Mary Jane, Samuel 
Joseph (our subject), James B. and William. They are all now deceased 
with the exception of the subject of this review and William, the youngest 
of the family. John W. was a soldier in the L'nion army during the Civil 
war, serving three years in the Thirty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. 

Samuel J. Milligan had the advantages of a good common school edu- 
cation, later attending the Presbyterian Academy at Waveland. He then 
took up farming and has continued active as a general farmer and^tock raiser 
to the present time, having met with a large degree of success with the ad- 
vancing years, as a result of his close application and good management. He 
owns a farm of about two hundred acres. 

Mr. MiUigan was married on September 17, 1878 to Sarah E. Little, 
daughter of Alec and Anna (Bowen) Little, these parents being natives of 
Pennsylvania, and the family originally came from Scotland and Wales. 
The family of Alec Little and wife consisted of five children, namely : James 
W. was the eldest; Susan is the wife of Dr. J. E. Sterrett, a practicing phy- 
sician of Los Angeles, California: Sarah E. (or Sally as she is familiarly 



MONTGOMERY COUXTV, INDIANA. ■ ' 39 

called) is the wife of our subject: Anna and Aiiiicliiia are the two youn,i;est. 
These children are all still living. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Milligan has been without issue. Politically, 
he is a Republican, and religiously, a Presbyterian. 



NATHAN G. KESLER. 

In many respects the career of Nathan (i. Keslcr, for nian_\' decades one 
of the progressi\e agriculturists and stock men of Monegomery county, is 
peculiarly instructive in that it shows what a well defined purpose, supple- 
mented by correct principles and high ideals, can accomplish in the face of 
discouraging circumstances. It is an example of triumph over obstacles, the 
winning of success by honorable methods, and as such may be safely followed 
by those whose life work is yet to be accomplished. He is a fine type of the 
sterling pioneer, having invaded the forests of this locality when settlers 
were none too numerous and when there was much to be done before a com- 
fortable home could rise and good crops be reaped from the \irgin soil, but 
he is a man who has never permitted discouraging situations to influence liim, 
but forged ahead despite of them, and won not only material success. Init the 
good will and esteem of all who know him. By his upright and honorable 
career as a general farmer and citizen he has won the good will of his fellow 
citizens. It is always his endeavor to advance in every possible way the puli- 
lic good, and this cannot be too highly commended, as it is only the narrow- 
minded man who makes his chief object the acquisition of wealth, regardless 
of the rights and feelings of others. 

Mr. Kesler was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, on January 8, 183S. 
He is a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (nraybill) Kesler. and the grandson 
of Jacob and Elizabeth (Shearer) Kesler. There were ten children in the 
family of whom Nathan G. was the fifth in urder of birth. He was eight 
years old when he accompanied his parents from the old famil\- homestead to 
Montgomery county, Indiana, making the long overland journey by wagon, 
at a time when wagon roads were few, when most streams were unbridged 
and they crossed but one railroad on the entire journey. Of this trip our sub- 
ject recalls many interesting incidents, having a good recollection of the same. 
The family located in the northeastern part of Scott township, this county, 
where Benjamin Kesler purchased two hundred and forty acres of land, a 
small part of which had been cleared. Nearly, everybody in this locality at 



I 140 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

that time lived in log cabins, homes like the modern farm house were not to 
be found. Benjamin Kesler set to work on his virgin ground with a will 
and soon had a good farm developed and a comfortable home established, 
and here he spent the rest of his life, meeting death suddenly, being killed on 
the railroad in 1893. He had devoted his entire life to agricultural pursuits. 
His wife preceded him to the grave in 1886. They were both members of the 
Dunkard church. Ten children were born to them, named as follows: John 
M., who devoted his life to farming but lived in Crawfordsville, died about 
1905, leaving a widow who still lives in Crawfordsville; Eliza'beth married 
Samuel T. Kenney, moved to Iowa and later to Florida, where she died re- 
cently; Catherine, widow of Jacob Himes, deceased, lives in the northern part 
of Scott township; Solomon lives in Ladoga, Indiana; Nathan G., of this 
sketch ; Samuel, who died in April, 1910, lived in Ladoga, left a widow but no 
living children; Susan is the widow of Samuel C. Thompson, and she lives 
with her children near New Ross, this county; Mary is the wife of Wash- 
ington Neff and they live in Ladoga; Nancy married William Mangus and 
thev live near Whitesville: Jacob, the youngest, lives on a farm near Ladoga. 

Nathan G. Kesler grew to manhood on the home farm in this county and 
there worked when a boy, attending the district schools during the winter 
months. \\'hen twenty-one years old he began farming for himself on rented 
land, also farmed some on his father's land. In 1866 he married Mary Eliza- 
beth Harshburger, daughter of Samuel Harshburger and wife. Six children 
were born of that marriage, namely ; Louie Lee lives with her sister, Mrs. 
Hester near New Market, this county; Samuel B., who remained unmarried, 
died in 1901 ; William Harry, who was in the clothing business both at James- 
town and Ladoga, sold out his stores in December, 1912, is now engaged in 
buying and selling real estate, has a fine home at Jamestown, and has three 
sons; Sarah J. who married Charles Buser lives in the northern part of Scott 
township on a farm and they have two children, Cline and Bennie ; John 
Milton, who lives alx)ut six miles south of Crawfordsville on a farm married 
Nora Davidson and they ha\-e three sons, Cl}-de and Claj-ton ; Elizabeth E. 
is the wife of Elmer Hester and they live on a farm near the center of the 
north line of Scott township, and they have one son, Donald. 

The mother of the above named children was called to her eternal rest 
in 1905, and in 1909 Nathan G. Kesler married for his second wife, Mrs. 
Rosa (Frankebarger) Brookshire, widow of John Brookshire, deceased. 
Three children were born of her first union, namely : William lives on a farm 
in the southern part of Scott township; Sarah is at home with her mother and 



MONTGOMERY COl'NTV. IK'DIAXA. 



Step-father; Charles is a railway telegrapher and lives in Sioux City. lnwa. 

Nathan G. Kesler has farmed all his life in ScoU townsliip. l^'.arly in 
his career he bonght a farm in the southern part of the township and lived 
there for a time, and, prospering from the first he eventually became the 
owner of a number of good farms, owning about fi\e hundred acres of valu- 
able land at one time, a large part of which he dixitled among bis children. 
He has lieen a man of industry, sound judgment and cnter|)rise and be 
farmed and raised stock on a large scale. He is now li\ing in the soulli- 
eastern part of Section ii. Scott township. Me is a stockholder in the 
Farmers and Merchants Bank at Ladoga, also a stockholder in the Montgom- 
ery County Agricultural Society. 

Politically. Air. Ke.sler is a Democrat and has lieen acti\e in the affairs 
of his party. He was trustee of Scott townsbi]i for three terms, having been 
elected first in 1880, again in 1882, and a third time in 1888. He gave 
eminent satisfaction in this capacity. He is a member of the Christian 
church, while his wife holds membership with the Baptist church. 



DOREN CLORE. 



Conspicuous among the representati\e business men and public-spirited 
citizens of Montgomery count}- is the well known gentleman whose name 
forms the caption of this article. Doren Clore, agriculturist and hardware 
merchant of W'aveland. Brown township, h.as made bis intluence felt for good 
in his community, being a man of sterling worth, whose life has lieen closely 
interwoven with the history of the communit\- in which he resides and whose 
efiforts have always been for the material adxancement of the same, as well as 
for the social and moral welfare of his fellow men. and the well regulated 
life he has led. thereby gaining the respect and admiration of all his fellow- 
citizens, entitling him to representation in a liiograpbical work of the scape in- 
tended in the present volume. 

Mr. Clore was born in Moiitg-onier\- count}-. Indiana. Xo\-cml>er 24. 
1852. He is a son of Simeon and Mary ( Lnsk ) Clore. The father was 
bori-i in the state of Kentuck}-. ii-i the year 1S21 and his death occurred on 
May 27. 1902. The rnother of our subject was born in Indiana in the year 
1824 and her death occurred in 1859. These parents received very limited 
schooling, however, the father became a widely read man. He devoted his 
life successfully to general farming and stock raising. His family coiisistcd 



I 142 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of seven children, all still living, namely : Salmon, Joel, Julia Ann, Susan, 
Doren, AIar\-in and Alary. Five of them live in this county. 

Doren Clore was reared on the home farm and there he assisted with 
the general work about the place when a boy, attending the common schools 
in the wintertime. He has been content to spend his life in Montgomery- 
county. He was married on September i, 1881 to Molly E. Gaines, a native 
of Boone county, Kentucky, having been born there on February 7, 1859. 
There she grew to womanhood and received a good common school educa- 
tion, subsequently attending Hamilton College at Lexington, thus becoming 
highly educated. She is a daughter of Alonzo and Mary (Christy) Gaines. 
The father was born on September 20, 1825, in Boone county, Kentucky, and 
his death occurred on January 26, 1885. The mother of our subject was 
also born in Boone county, Kentucky, on December i, 1826, and she was 
called to her rest on March 10, 1874. Alonzo Gaines received a very good 
education for those early days and he followed school teaching until his mar- 
riage, then turned his attention to farming and was very successful as a gen- 
eral farmer and stock raiser. He was a loyal Democrat, but he was not a 
public man, staying close to his work on the farm. He and his wife were 
highly honored in their community, known for their hospitality and neigh- 
borliness. Regarding the latter we quote the following lines which appeared 
in a home paper at the time of her death : 

"Died March 10, 1874 at her home in Boone county, at the age of forty- 
eight years, after an illness of several months, Mrs. Mary Gaines, wife of 
Alonzo Gaines and daughter of Simeon and Olivia Christy. Mrs. Gaines 
had been a member of the Christian church for seventeen years. She was a 
good and true woman in all the walks of life; sympathizing and charitable, 
and illustrating in her own conduct all the higher Christian virtues. She 
was ever ready with means and counsel to assist all who laid claim to her aid 
or attention. As a church member she was the stay and support of the weak, 
and her wise counsel and affectionate admonitions encouraged the doubting 
and the timid. It may truly be said of her that she served well her Master. 
As a neighbor she will be sadly missed from the community from whose midst 
she has been taken, and as a wife and mother her husband and children have 
been bereft of a true and devoted friend whose equal they can never know 
on earth, and for whose loss there is no consolation save that to be found in 
the contemplation of a happy meeting in the realms of eternal bliss where her 
pure soul has found a resting-place in the bosom of her God." 

Two children were born to Alonzo Gaines and wife. ]\Iollv E., wife of 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 1143 

Mr. Clore, of this review; and Alonzo, Jr. The hitter was Ijcmii <in May jj, 
l86i. He married Addie Utz, and he has continued to reside in lioune 
county, Kentuck)-, where he is engaged in fanning. 

Doren Clore has devoted his active Hfe to general farming and stocl-: rais- 
ing in southwestern Montgomery county and now in addition he owns a half 
interest in a hardware store in Waveland. A large trade is carried on with 
the surrounding country, and as a farmer he has been \ery successful. He 
lives in Waveland where he has a fine modern home, attractive and com- 
modious, containing ten neatly furnished rooms. Through his able manage- 
ment and close application, Mr. Clore has become one of the substantial men 
of his community. Politically, he is a Progressive. 

Mrs. Clore is a meml^er of the Christian church, and is faithful in her 
support of the same. 



THOMAS JEFFERSON ALLXUTT. 

Another of the sterling Kentuckians who left their fair native land and 
braved the wilds of Montgomery county, Indiana, and did much for the 
subsequent upbuilding of the same was the late Thomas Jefferson Allnutt, a 
man of many commendable qualities, whose plain, honest life resulted in no 
little good to his community in many ways. 

Mr. Allnutt was born in Owen county, Kentucky, June 15, 1838. He 
was a son of Ninian and Mary Ann Allnutt, both natives of Kentucky, the 
father born in 1785 and died on September 26, 1858; the mother was born 
in 1792, and died on February 16, 1858. 

The subject of this memoir grew to manhood on the home farm and he 
lived with his parents until their deaths, remaining in his native state. 

When the Civil war came on, unlike many of his neighbors, Mr. Allnutt 
cast his lot with the Southern army, enlisting in 1862, in Company C, Fourth 
Kentucky Cavalry, in which he served very gallantly for three and one-half 
years, during which he took part in twelve important engagements and was 
once wounded. He was honorably discharged at the close of the war and 
soon returned home and resumed farming, remaining in Kentucky until in 
October, 1869. He located in Montgomery county on January 27, 1870, 
and here he married Mrs. Georgia A. (Frame; Long, widow of \\'illiam D. 
C. Long, deceased, and a daughter of John and Sarah Frame. She had one 
son by her first husband, James C. Long, who was born March 26, i860. 



1144 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. AUnutt, three of whom died 
in infancy, and two are still living, namely: Sallie B. i.s the wife of \\'illiam 
Welch and lives on the William Goodbar place southeast of the mother's 
home. She has one daughter, Naomi. Gertrude May married Arthur 
Nicholas, who lives in the southwestern part of Scott townsip. where Mr. 
Nicholas is successfully engaged in farming. The}- have three daughters, 
namely: Ina Myrtle, Agnes Marie, and Gail Belle. 

Mr. Allnutt was a successful farmer and stock raiser, was honest and a 
hard worker. He and his wife belonged to the Methodist church. His 
death occurred on December i, 1901. 



ELMER HESTER. 



It is a pleasure to an_\' one, whether a farmer or not, to look over a well 
improved and tinely kept landed estate like that of Elmer Hester, of Scott 
township Montgomery county, for, like his honored father, he is a man who 
believes in keeping abreast of the times, in adopting, so far as practicable, the 
most approved twentieth century methods in general farming and stock 
raising. As a result of his careful study and investigation he has, while yet 
young in years, about solved the question of scientific farming as we know 
and understand it today. However, where agriculture has gained, the educa- 
tional element in this locality has lost, for Mr. Hester was formerly regarded 
as one of the leading public school teachers in this section of the state. He 
has alwa}'s stood for progressiveness, riot only in material and educational 
matters, but in political, moral and civic conditions, and he is an ardent advo- 
cate of wholesome living and honesty in public life, and while laboring for 
his individual advancement he has never been found neglectful of his duties 
to his neighbors and the general public. 

Mr. Hester was born in Brown township, this county, in 1880. He is a 
son of James and Lucy (Eads) Hester, a complete sketch of whom appears 
on other pages of this volume. It wa,s on the home place, north of the village 
of Parkersburg, that Elmer Hester grew to manhood, and when a boy did his 
share of the work during crop seasons, and there he continued to reside until 
his marriage. He attended the district schools and later the Ladog"a high 
school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1901. Having long 
entertained an ambition to enter the profession as teacher and desiring to 
properlv equip himself for the same, he entered the State Normal School at 
Terre Haute, where he made an excellent record. 



MONTGOMERY COL-NTV, INDIANA. i 1 45 

Thus well c(|uii)i>e(l fur his \ucalioii he he.^an teachin.i;, which he UA- 
lowed t(ir a jjerioil of se\en years, lieginnint;' in Walnut tuwushi]). his nali\e 
county. He taught H\-e years in Scott township. His ser\ices were in great 
demand, tor he was soon recognized as an instructor of exceplii mal ahilitw 
one who spared no pains in gi\ing his pupils the hest and latest according to 
advanced methods of instruction. During this period he farmed during the 
summer months. 

Finally, tiring of the close conhnenient of the school room, he turned 
his attention exclusively to general farming and stock raising. He has en- 
joyed to the full the freedom of the country and has prospered through his 
close application and good managementj He is the owner of a fine improved 
and producti\-e farm of one hundred and eighty-four acres in the south- 
western part of Section 3, Scott township, all under a fine state of ciUti\ation 
and is one of the choice farms in the southern part of the county. He has a 
good set of huildings on the place, and in connection with general farming 
he raises a good grade of live stock from year to year. 

In 1906 Mr. Hester married Salome Kesler, daughter of Xathan Kesler, 
a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume. Mrs. Hester grew to 
womanhood and received her education in her native community. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hester was horn one son, Donald. 

Politically, Mr. Hester is a Republican, but he has never been active in 
public affairs, preferring to devote his attention to his indixitlual affairs and 
to his family. He and his wife, being pleasant, agreeable and neighborly 
have made a host of friends since settling on the farm in Scott township. 



DAVID \v. (;er.\rd. 

Distincti\'cl\" one of the great men of his day and generation in the Mid- 
dle West, and one of humanity's benefactors, was the late David W. (ierard. 
supreme chief and founder of the Tribe of Ben-Hur. Involuntarily our 
minds reach out for the threads of histor)- that made the fabric of thi^ char- 
acter, the character of this man's worth. Were those elements resident in 
pioneer days alone? Or is it length f)f years, or is it stirring times, or any 
one of these, or all of them, blended in one composite whole? Or rather were 
these the canvas? The Divine Artist drew the picture and put in it its wcirth 
immortal and traced therein "the character of releasing," the song of triumph, 
the voice of history. The business period oi this man's life is worth relating; 



I 146 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the obstacles encountered, overcome; the self-reHant honesty, the equipoise, 
the absence of resentment — these supplement a tale that is not always told of 
those who are "diligent in business" ; but is told of those who, diligent in 
business, fervent in spirit, serve humanity, and it has been well said by one of 
our wisest and greatest of men that "They who sen'e humanity most, serve 
God best." 

David W. Gerard, who for many years ranked as the most influential 
citizens of Crawfordsville and one of Indiana's foremost citizens, was born 
on a farm near Port Jefferson, Shelby county, Ohio, July 7, 1844. His par- 
ents were pioneer residents of that county, his father. Abner H. Gerard, being 
a farmer and merchant. The latter also owned and operated a large tan- 
nery in the village. He was a man of great force of character and excellent 
business methods, a devout Methodist and a pronounced abolitionist. Com- 
ing as he did of heroic stock, his many admirable qualities were inherited by 
his son. 

The Gerard family is of French Huguenot ancestry. The founder of the 
family in this country came from France after the St. Bartholomew massa- 
cre. The immediate founder of the family in the middle western part of the 
United States, Nathaniel Gerard, came to Cincinnati, Ohio, from Pennsyl- 
vania, with his five brothers, in the latter part of the eighteenth century. 
Three of the brothers settled in Miami county, Ohio, one in Kentucky, and 
one in southern Indiana. 

The grandfather of David W. Gerard, after whom he was named, was 
killed by the Indians in 1816 while making rails near his cabin on Lost creek, 
in Miami county, Ohio. Mr. Gerard's father left Ohio in 1849, coming to 
Indiana and opening a general store near Romney, in Tippecanoe county. 
In six months he died, leaving a wife and three small boys. The oldest of these 
bovs was David W. Gerard, then less than six years of age. There were 
six children by a former marriage. Gathering the remnants of a meagre 
property, the brave little mother returned on a canal boat to Sidney, Ohio. 
Then came the terrible years of struggle with poverty, but this woman of 
courage never faltered. 

When David W. was ten years of age his mother remo\'ed to Greenville, 
Ohio, where he began his struggle for an education, his youth and earl)- man- 
hood being surrounded with the hardships, limitations and privations known 
to the poor, but, being endowed by nature with a resolute will, this school of 
harsh experience developed his faculties into the broadest manhood and so 
eminentlv qualified hint to master difficult problems of life which were to con- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 1147 

front him in his after years of usefulness. He worked on farms, in lihick- 
smith shops, sawed wood and studied hard. In those primitive (la\s it was 
difiticult for children to acquire good educations, and because he was a father- 
less boy, Mr. Gerard experienced unusual difficulty at a time when lie was 
most anxious to be in school. However, he succeeded and wiien scarcely 
sixteen years of age was able to bgein teaching school. A Ixiy with less am- 
bition and natural ability would have failed where he succeeded. 

While Mr. Gerard was teaching school the Civil war broke out. He w as 
then living at Greenville, Ohio. In 1861, shortly after the firing on l-'ort 
Sumter, Mr. Gerard enlisted in the Eighth Ohio Battery and served through- 
out the four years of the war. He bore the scars of that titanic struggle, 
where he displayed that chivalrous spirit which has ever dominated his entire 
life. He fought gallantly for his country and gave of his best towards the 
perpetuation of the Union, participating in many of the important campaigns 
and great battles. He was mustered out in August, 1863. 

When that memorable conflict was ended, .Mr. (ierard, with his widnwed 
mother and his brothers, came to Montgomery county, Indiana, and there lie 
again took up the task of teaching school. He had nnt lised there long until 
he met and was married to Elizabeth Krug, daughter of one of the prominent 
families of near Crawfordsville. The marriage occurred in January, 1866. 
Miss Krug's home was at Crawfordsville, but she was born near Pleasant Hill, 
now \\'ingate, Indiana, and there was married. 

Mr. Gerard gave up the work of school teaching to engage in the real 
estate and insurance business in Crawfordsville, continuing in this line of 
endeavor until 1873, when he removed to Indianapolis, continuing in the 
same business there until 1878, when he returned to Crawfordsville, and there 
he resided the rest of his life. He resumed the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness there with his usual success. In 1886 he and Frank L. Snyder were 
associated together with some other citizens in forming the Indiana and Ohio 
Live Stock Insurance Company, of Crawfordsville, now one of the leading 
live stock insurance companies of the United States. S. E. Voris, former 
mayor of Crawfordsville, was an original stockholder and at one time was 
the president of the company. He and ]\Ir. Gerard later disposed of their 
holdings to Harry N. Naylor, John R. Bonnell and other Crawfordsville 
citizens. 

During the years that he was in the insurance and real estate Inisiness 
Mr. Gerard worked hard, accomplished large results and at the same time did 
some serious thinking. He joined several insurance orders and liecame a 



1148 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

firm believer in fraternal insurance. Early in the nineties he conceived the 
idea of organizing a fraternal insurance society in his own city of Crawfords- 
ville. He profited by his experience in selling insurance, his experience 
gained from membership in other fraternal societies and his wide experience 
as a business man. He was engaged for many weeks and perhaps months in 
thinking over the details of the organization and in perfecting the plans which 
have their fruition today in the wonderful Supreme Tribe of Ben-Hur, one 
of tire largest, most flourishing and greatest fraternal insurance Drganizations 
in the world. 

Mr. Ccrard was the mo\-ing spirit behind this organization. Associated 
with him were bVank L. Snyder, who died six years ago; ex-Mayor S. E. 
Voris, now supreme keeper of tribute of the i^rder, and Dr. J. F. Davidson, 
supreme medical examiner. Mr. Gerard was of that class of men who stood 
for progressive movements and the uplift of humanity. He was a great ad- 
mirer of the late Gen. Lew Wallace, in fact, was a close personal friend of 
the author of "Ben-Hur," and had read and pondered on the book until he 
caught the up-lift of the spirit of the Lowly Nazarene, "who went about doing 
good." He lived and moved among men, stirring them to enthusiastic effort, 
and the broad principles of brotherhood and benevolence were so deeply in- 
carnated in him that they contributed greatly in achieving the success attained 
by the society fr(_)m its organization, and which now is, and e\er will remain, 
a living testimonial of his ser\ice in the cause of the fraternities, ever ex- 
emplifying their highest principles and precepts. While thinking about the 
organization of a fraternal insurance society, it occurred to Mr. Gerard that 
the story of Ben-Hur could be used as a foundation for the society. He 
secured the written permission of General Wallace to make such use of the 
story as he desired and to call his new society the Tribe of Ben-Hur. Indeed, 
it was Lew Wallace who suggested the name as it is now. It had been in 
Mr. Gerard's mind to call the order the "Knights of Ben-Hur." When the 
name was suggested to General Wallace during a talk the two men had, the 
General placed his hand on Mr. Gerard's shoulder and said; "Well, my dear 
boy, there were no knights in those days: Tribes there were, however; so 
why wouldn't it be well to call it the "Tribe of Ben-Hur." " ]\Ir. Gerard, of 
course, readily acquiesced, and thus the Tribe of Ben-Hur secured its name. 

The supreme tribe of Ben-Hur was founded March i, 1894, Simonides 
Court No. I, of Crawfordsville, being the mother court. The society had a 
very meagre beginning, although it was launched with flattering prospects, 
as Mr. Gerard had worked untiringly to secure a good list of charter members. 



MOXTOOMnRV COrXTV. INDIAXA. I 1 40 

Associated with him in tlie forniatinn nt the unlcr were- a minilicr cif pnnnin- 
ent pubhc. business and ])r()fessi(jnal men nf Indiana, 'i'he i'\v< supreme 
officers elected were as follows: Supreme chief, e\-( in\ crndr. ha j. lliase: 
supreme scribe, 1". L. Snyiler ; supreme medical examiner, J. !■'. Navidsdn, 
.M. D. : supreme keeper of tribute, S. 1'^. X'uris, and an executive cnmniittee 
consisting- of 1). W. Gerard, F. L. Snyder and W. T. I\(iyse. The election 
of ex-Governor, Ira J. Chase, as supreme ciiief, was made at the recpiest uf 
Mr, Gerard, who desired to devote all his time to the origan izat inn work. 
Upon the death of Ira J. Chase, which occurred in Ma\ i i, iS()3, Li.l. L. T. 
Dickason was chosen by the executi\e committee to till nut the uuex|)ire(l 
term of Mr. Chase as supreme chief. 

After Simonides Court had been ori.;anized and the actual start made 
tdward securing members and writing insurance, Mr. Gerard industricmsly 
began the work of establishing other courts in nearln- Indiana towns. That 
year a number of courts were organized with good prospects. With beautiful 
ritualistic work, with emphasis placed upon sociability and good fellowship 
among the members and with good insurance written in attractive form and 
at reasonable rates, there was much in the principles of the Tribe of Ben- 
Hur that appealed to the people. Hard work, earnest efforts and many 
difficulties confronted the founders of the tribe the first year, but at its close 
the order had 759 members and there was a surplus of $2,653 in the treasury. 
The year of 1905 witnessed wonderful strides in the order, which pushed out 
and entered other states. Its membership was increased to 3,551 and its 
surplus to $13,945. Since then the order has flourished in a most remark- 
able manner. At the end of the year 190S there were 104.250 members. 
while the surplus amounted to $1,174,545. The surplus was $1,403,493.40 at 
the close of 1909. In 19 10 the society had 1,400 courts and was doing busi- 
ness in no less than twenty-nine states in the Union. Up to that year the 
total suin that had been paid to the families of deceased members was 
$7,013,859.38. Indeed, the growth of the society during the eighteen years 
of its existence has l)een a splendid one, having enrolled in that time consider- 
ably over a quarter of a million men and women from the thirty-odd states 
in which the order is now represented. The report of the supreme scribe and 
supreme keeper of tribute under date of December 31, 191 1, gave the follow- 
ing figures: Number of members, 119,953, in thirty-two states of the I'nion ; 
insurance in force, $139,825,900: deaths benefits paid in 191 1, 1,022, amount- 
ing to $1,146,124: balances, all funds, $1,651,410.71 : net assets, $1,525,218. 
It has ne\er shown a loss of membership or funds in an\' year of its existence. 



1 150 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

but on the contrary has made a steady and conservative growth, sacrificing 
quantity often to quality, and it stands today in the fraternal world an order 
famous for the personnel of its large and loyal membership. 

The plan and name of the order were popular from the beginning. The 
beneficial feature was entirely new and novel; the amount of protection 
granted each member depended upon the age of admission, but a uniform 
amount of contribution was charged each member. This plan was simple, 
equitable and easily understood. No assessments were levied on the death of 
a member, but a regular stipulated sum was collected each month. An 
emergency fund was created from the beginning, and women were adniitted 
on an absolutely equal basis with men. 

In 1896, Mr. Gerard was elected supreme chief of the order and he lield 
that important and responsible position until his death, in a manner that re- 
flected much credit upon his ability and to the eminent satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. He had endeared himself to the thousands of Ben-Hur members 
throughout the country and one has but to attend even for a few minutes a 
supreme meeting of the order to learn in what great esteem and respect he is 
held. 

Mr. Gerard showed his unlimited faith in fraternal insurance by carrying 
practically all of his fifteen thousand dollars of life insurance in fraternal 
orders. In founding the Tribe of Ben-Hur one of his ideas was to give in- 
surance at more reasonable rates than is charged b}- old-line insurance com- 
panies. He studied rate table after rate table and every plain imaginable 
was tried out in his mind. The plans and tables of all the fraternal orders 
in existence were studied by him, and by taking the best that was in all of 
them he molded together the plans that were to be followed by the Tribe of 
Ben-Hur. There were many months of anxious watching and sleepless 
nights, but they have all been rewarded. 

Besides being a shrewd and capable business man and organizer, Mr. 
Gerard was a convincing and forceful speaker and a clear and logical writer. 
In the eighties, while engaged in the real estate and insurance business, he 
became interested in The Indiana Fa.rnier, of Indianapolis, a publication still 
in existence which circulates among the farmers in Indiana and other states. 
He was editor of the magazine for awhile and helped to make it a better, 
bigger and more popular paper. As soon as the supreme tribe of Ben-Hur 
was organized, Mr. Gerard decided to publish a monthly paper, telling the 
members what was being done in the society and keeping them informed with 
regard to matters of interest. Many of the best articles that have appeared 
in Tlie Chariot have been from his able pen. 



MOXTGOMKUV COLNTV. INDIANA. II5I 

In addition to iiis connection with tlic Supreme 'i'ribe of Bcu-llur. Mr. 
Gerard was also associated with a nunilxT of other husiness enterprises of 
Crawfordsville. He was a stockholder and director of the Elston National 
Bank, and he was one of the original stockholders of tlie Crawfordsville State 
Bank. He was one of the men most interested in tlie establishment of the 
Crawfordsville Wire Bound Box Company. 

During all these years Mr. Gerard was a very public-spirited citizen. 
He was interested — and deeply interested, too — in e\erything that lias been 
for the welfare and best interests of the city of Crawfordsville. He was 
proud of his city, proud of her citizens, proud of her position as one of the 
best little cities of Indiana. 

For years Mr. Gerard was a devout member of the First Metliodist 
Episcopal church of Crawfordsville. He lield membership in a number of 
fraternal orders besides Ben-Hur, including the Foresters, Protected Home 
Circle, Knights and Ladies of Security, Woodmen of the W'orld and Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. He als(j belonged to the Knights of Pythias, 
the Improved Order of Red Men and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He was a charter member of the Crawfordsville lodge of Elks. 

Mr. Gerard was a man with a kind heart and a broad sympathy and 
charity. For years after his marriage his widowed mother made her home 
with him and he was always strongly devoted to her. Her every wish and 
desire was gratified and his love for his mother was unbounded. • He was also 
a kind and loving father, strongly attached to his family and devoted to them 
much more than is the average father. His family consists of two daugiiters 
and one son, all of whom are married and living in Crawfordsville : Mrs. 
Dr. J. F. Davidson, Airs. Charles \\\ Iliff and Dr. Royal H. Gerard. Mr. 
Gerard also leaves two brothers, Charles, of Crawfordsville, and Abner, of 
Long Beach, California. Wesley Gerard, of Wisconsin, is a half-brother. 

Mr. Gerard was generous to a fault. He regarded truth and honor 
above all else. Charity and benevolence formed one of the ruling motives 
of his life. He was a sincere friend, a kind neighlior and an admirable 
citizen. The influences of his life will live in Crawfordsville and. in fact, in 
Indiana and the world through succeeding generations, and the Supreme 
Tribe of Ben-Hur will forever remain a lasting monument. In thinking of 
Mr. Gerard's life, one recalls the language the immortal Shakespeare spoke 
through his character Antonius : 

"His life is gentle and the elements 

So mixed in him, that nature can stand up 

And sav to all the world. This is a man." 



I 152 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

At his late beautiful residence on East Main street, Crawfordsville, 
Indiana, on Monday, January 3, 1910, David W. Gerard passed to his 
eternal rest, after a brief illness, his sudden taking away coming as a 
profound shock to thousands of friends and admirers. He was si.\ty-six 
years old. 

In \iew of the universal prominence of David W. Gerard and in order 
to show the widespread esteem in which he was held, we quote at some length 
from the eulogies pronounced upon him, reprinting briefly from a few of the 
many thousands. 

John C. Snyder, supreme scribe of the Tribe of Ben-Hur, said: "For 
fifteen years 1 ha\'e been connected in business with Mr. Gerard, and during 
that time have had occasion to know him very well indeed. Those who were 
closest to him can best testify to his great and generous impulses and his 
broad principles. I think one of his greatest virtues was his keen sympathy 
for his fellow men. Were they properous, he rejoined with them; if un- 
fortunate, he was always ready to offer substantial aid. Xo movement for 
good was ever too great to challenge his admiration and approval ; none ever 
too small to escape his notice. He had had a wide experience in business 
affairs, and I regarded him as a man of most extraordinaiy attainments. 
Aside from his immediate family and close relatives, to whom he was always 
a bulwark of safety, he will be greatly missed by his neighbors, his friends 
and his business associates. It is a pleasure to testify to the virtues of one 
so generally admired." 

S. E. Voris, mentioned in preceding paragraphs, said : "I have been 
associated closely with Mr. Gerard in business for the past sixteen years, and 
I have always found him to lie a man of advanced ideas. He was full of 
good suggestions and upon every occasion had just the right thing to sug- 
gest. He possessed wonderful energ}- and industry. He was a natural 
fraternalist and was a great believer in the brotherhood of man. He gave 
the closing vears of his life for this great cause and he succeeded in his pur- 
pose. He was the most kind-hearted man I ever knew, and I never knew a 
more companionable man. It was a delight to be in his company. He was 
liberal and charitable and the deeds of charity which he did are many, very 
many. He thought ill of no one. In his death Crawfordsville loses one of 
her very best citizens." 

Gilbert Howell said : "Not only his family, the Tribe of Ben-Hur, his 
fellow officers and his home community sustained a loss when Mr. Gerard 
passed over the great divide, but the fraternal world has been robbed of one 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. II53 

of its most shining lights, Ijrightest and most IjriUiant cxiiiincnls. lie was 
lionored and loved as has been the lot of but few men, and his genial and 
kindly personality, his undaunted faithful friendship, his zealous exposition 
of fraternal brotherhood, have wrought mightily for good in the world and 
we can truthfully say, 'He has been a friend to man.' As one of the founders 
of the Supreme Tribe of Ben-Hur he has builded a living monument in the 
hearts of grateful widows and orphans which will endure for ages, and by 
his broad vision and grasp of financial afYairs, his leadership of men. the 
fraternal world will continue to pay him grateful homage. He was one of 
the pioneers whose labors have made it possible for the great fraternal army 
to bring sunshine and cheer into the homes darkened by the Grim Reaper, 
and although he has passed away, the work he has inaugurated, and the move- 
ment for the betterment of mankind will continue to liless and help humanity. 
I cannot pay him a higher triliute tiian to say. 'He loved all men. and was 
by all men beloved.' " 

John R. Bonnell. a member of the executive committee ot the Su])reine 
Tribe of Ben-Hur, said: "Mr. (ierard was to me a man in win mi 1 felt that 
'I could pin my faith." I regarded him in many respects as superior to ail in 
the fraternal world. He, in my humble judgment, did more to make famous 
our beloved city than all others, save General Wallace." 

Col. Isaac C. Elston said; "Mr. Gerard was a most kind neighbor and 
affectionate father, devoted to his family, with a cheerful, cordial greeting 
for all his friends, and was ever ready to give credit for good deeds and ex- 
cuse mistakes in others. During the past five years I ha\e constantlv met him 
in directors' meetings of the bank with which we have been identified, and 
learned to admire his business ability and respect his sound judgment in 
finance: it was as a builder that his talents were most consi)icuous, as the 
phenomenal growth and success of the Supreme Tribe of Ben-Hur. promoted. 
organized and guided by him to its present enviable position in ihe insurance 
world, bears testimony." 

G. H. D. Sutherland, publisher of the Cnvz^'fords-i'illc Rciicw. had the 
following to say, editorially, in his paper, on January 4. iqiq: "David W. 
Gerard is dead. This was the message quicklv si)read about the citv Mondav 
night when the angel of the Almighty came with a message and summoned 
him home. With patience and fortitude he had endured the agonies that 
were his portion ere the spirit was loosed from his mortal body and dissolu- 
tion was at hand. His last recognition of human countenance was a smile 
for his son. 
(73) 



I 1 54 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

"When the end comes for a man hke 'Dave' Gerard it isn't hard, for 
friends at least, to say: 'Oh, death, where is thy sting? Oh, grave, where 
is thy victory? He is not dead. He lives on and will continue to live in the 
lives of succeeding generations as long as there shall be a Supreme Tribe of 
Ben-Hur. He leaves a monument, noble and ever-increasing, which promises 
to flourish as long as 'the milk of human kindness' flows from human breast. 
He was a kindly soul. In it was a prodigal wealth of charity that knew no 
bounds. He lived to spread the gospel of brotherly love. He believed the 
highest good can be accomplished by benefiting his brother man. 

"In his early business days he dealt in various kinds of insurance and he 
long cherished a dream of establishing a fraternal insurance society. He 
studied Gen. Lew Wallace's book Ben-Hur and pictured a beautiful ritual 
taken from its pages. His sympathies extended to men and women and so 
the organization which he founded was unrestricted as to sex. Men and 
women alike are taught the beautiful lesson from Ben-Hur. Launched in a 
year of panic, with moderate financial 'backing, the Supreme Tribe of Ben- 
Hur had many an obstacle to overcome and little to encourage its founder and 
those intimately associated with him. But optimism is a splendid asset and 
Mr. Gerard had large deposits in that bank. He surrounded himself with 
shrewd business men and worked indefatigably himself to get the order 
started. It is necessary here to refer to statistics to establish his ultimate 
success. He lived long enough to 'see his dreams come true.' 

"Great as is the blow which the Supreme Tribe of Ben Hur has sustained 
in Mr. Gerard's death, the order will survive it and go majestically forward 
in its mission of relieving humanity of some of its ills. This is one of the 
best testimonials to his greatness. The society is so thoroughly organized, 
so surely established, so well directed by the executive board, that its future 
will see nothing but development and growth. 

"Mr. Gerard was an uncommon man. He started life with handicaps 
that have kept many men down to the level of the common place, but his am- 
bition enabled him to surmount every obstacle, and first attain an educa- 
tion, hard enough at the best half a century ago. That prepared him for ad- 
vancement later on. No one loved Crawfordsville more than David W. 
Gerard. He invested his means here and he predicted growth, development 
and prosperity as her portion in the years to come. He was ever ready with 
a word of encouragement for any young man who would inake his home here 
and attempt to assist in building up the city. Mr. Gerard was thoroughly 
honest. The Supreme Tribe of Ben-Hur has a clean record, free from any 



MONTl'.OMKKV COUN'TV, INDIANA. 1 1 55 

suspicion of graft, during its entire life of sixteen years, lie did nut at- 
tempt to take advantage of his position and influence to advance h\> nun 
interests. He stood ever for the good of the order, desiring that every mem- 
ber should share in its prosperity and growth. 

"Crawfordsville will miss this kindly man. lie was sncialik- and ikhil- 
was so humble but shared in his pleasant greeting. His smile and his hand- 
shake carried with them sincerity and warmth of hearty good feeling. His 
family and his relatives are assured that they have the symi)athy of the citi- 
zens of Crawfordsville in this, the hour i>i their aftlicticm," 

The second day of the seventii regular meeting of the Supreme Tribe 
of Ben-Hur, Wednesday, May 22. njio, a repcrl was made by the memorial 
committee, which was unanimousI\- adopted, antl li\e thousand copies of a 
"Memorial N'olume" was ordered printed, containing report of said com- 
mittee, and including the remarks offered by some of the members present 
upon that occasion. We reprint the closing lines of the committee's report : 
"Tiiis great society of the Sons and Daughters of Hur will forever be a living 
monument to his matchless genius and wisdom. He Ixiilded wiser than he 
knew or even dreamed, because he builded upon the eternal principles of truth, 
benevolence and honor. He discovered the gate to the paradise of (iod o])en 
wide, and the words 'whosoe\-er will, let him enter, and i)artake of the fruit 
of the life-gi\-ing tree in the midst tiiereof ; he seizeil the opportunity, sat 
beneath that tree and pluckefl therefrom the fruit tliat inspired him to see 
visions and dream dreams. For he was a man of visions and pro])hecy, an 
optimist of the highest type and character. In his visions he saw and 
prophesied the coming of the great and glorious Tribe of Ben-Hur, and lived 
to see his visions and prophecies realized and fulfilled. In the advancing 
ages the glory of his achievement and worth will come to be the more and 
more realized and appreciated by the coming generations. So long as civil- 
ization shall endure: so long as men and women continue to band themselves 
together to provide protection for their loved ones against the evil day: so 
long as the historian faithfully records the origin and work of great move- 
ments, having for their object the betterment of mankind, morally and 
mentally, so long will his name and fame remain. 

This is his own monument, builded by himself out of the thoughts of his 
great soul, and the principles he advocated and the works he wrought: a 
memorial more worthy and of more enduring substance than tliat of marl)le 
or of metal. 



IIS6 MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. 

"And while he ne^ds no other, it appears to the committee that this great 
tribe of the Sons and Daughters of Hur, who were contemporary with him, 
and who knew him best and are enjoying the fruits of his services and sacri- 
fices ; that it would be eminently fitting and proper that we should leave to 
future generations some kind of token, memeifto or memorial, expressive of 
the appreciation, high regard and esteem in which he was held by us ; a monu- 
ment worthy of him, worthy of our great order and its matchless principles. 
Whatever we may think, say or do in this regard, in the death of Brother 
Gerard it can be truly said, in the language of one of old, 'A prince and a 
great man has fallen in Israel." " 

At the memorial meeting above referred to many were the appropriate 
eulogies pronounced on Mr. Gerard, but space forbids more than a cursory 
glance at them in the following paragraphs : 

G. I. Kisner, of Terre Haute, Indiana: "We offer up our prayers and 
our tears for those who have preceded us in their departure from this world. 
Their accomplishments and their valor is given unto us upon monuments of 
marble, or granite, or perchance, cast in bronze, but the achievements of those 
to whom we have been united are handed down to us in our hearts which 
shall be enduring as long as time shall last and they shall weather all the 
storms of life. Their achievements will inspire us on to higher realms in 
this old world. Those of us who are particularly united by the ties of fra- 
ternity feel deeply this loss. To alleviate suffering and want, to bring cheer, 
and joy and sunshine, into the hearts and the homes of the people of this 
world, have they not thus builded well? Otherwise we would not have the 
Tribe of Ben-Hur and these other fraternal organizations thriving through- 
out our land. So let us cherish their memory, imitate their virtues and en- 
deavor to profit by the afflicting dispensation of Jehovah." 

Hon. Charles L. Wedding, Evansville, Indiana: "The fraternal world 
may well stand with uncovered head about the newly-made grave of our great 
leader, David W. Gerard. And now that this great spirit, our great leader, 
has gone from among us let us highly resolve that the great work he has done 
shall live after him, for indeed his labor, his achievements and his life of toil 
for brotherly love, for fraternity and for our humanity, should be and are 
a more enduring monument to his memory than sculptured marble or the 
eternal granite. And let us pray that this great order, founded by our great 
leader, and for which he did such herculean work, shall, like the orbs that 
constitute the Milky Way, grow brighter and brighter, as the ages pass away ; 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, INDIANA. II57 

that it shall become a vast ami spleiulid monument of "peace nn earth and i^ood 
will to men,' of fraternity, of brotherly lo\'e, upon which the men and women 
of all after-times may gaze with admiration forexer." 

Hon. Michael P. Kehoe, Baltimore, Maryland: "Our dei>aited chief, at 
first, although he saw nothing but opposition confront liim, ne\er for a 
moment faltered in what he considered to be his duty, but pushed onward this 
magnificent order, which was indeed his life work. We can only hope and 
accept the great truths that have been sent to us 1iy the Master, looking for 
life beyond, and I am sure, in the light of the work and character of our late 
departed chief, living as he did and considering the works he [lerformed, if 
there is such a thing as the glorious life beyond, there must l)e an everlasting 
place prepared for him who is gone." 

Dr. H. V. Beardsley, Ft. Worth. Texas: "Sixteen years ago, through 
Providence, or some other source, I met and formed a very lasting friend- 
ship with our late departed D. W. Gerard. He has not only been to me as a 
friend, but he has been to me as a father, and I do not believe there is a single 
member of the Tribe of Ben-Hur w ho has felt the loss of his departure more 
than I have. He was not only a friend of humanity, but he was a close per- 
sonal friend of those that met him on those grounds." 

Rev. Ernest Dailey Smith, Crawfordsville, Indiana: "David W. Gerard 
was a good man. I know that in forming an estimate of men, a preacher is 
put to a certain disadvantage. My impressions of Brother Gerard from my 
preosnal acquaintance with him, and from what those have said to me who 
have known him intimately, is that he was just the same behind a Sunday face 
and under Sunday clothes as he was in every-day attire. There was that 
evenness and balance and genuineness in him that made him always the 
same." 

W. H. Owen, Crawfordsville, Indiana: "Mr. Gerard was more than a 
member of the Tribe of Ben-Hur with me. Outside of all of the associations 
in the fraternal work, he was my friend, and my neighbor, and perhaps I 
might say an inspiration to do more than was intended when I was launched 
into the afifairs of this work. I feel that I have needed him almost e\er\' 
day since he passed away, and sometimes I get w^eary, for I could always rely 
on encouragement and the optimism of this man." 

W. B. Ramey, Crawfordsville, Indiana : "For the past ten years it has 
been a